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Offline alehrfeld  
#1 Posted : 26 May 2021 18:02:17(UTC)
alehrfeld

United States   
Joined: 17/01/2021(UTC)
Posts: 7
Location: Connecticut, Stamford
Hello, I would like to add a "City Station" to my layout, however I don't have the skills or patience to assemble one properly from a kit -- my attempts at kit-building in the past have been awful! For this reason, I prefer the assembled "built-up" models which are offered by Woodland Scenics, for example. Unfortunately, I have not found an assembled railway station (City Station) that is suitable; the Woodland Scenics people offer only "train depots" which are quite small. Does anyone know of a resource for this? For example, someone who would assemble and paint a kit professionally for a fee? If this has been asked and answered already, I apologize -- I just couldn't find any similar inquiry. Thanks for any and all help!
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Offline scraigen  
#2 Posted : 26 May 2021 18:24:16(UTC)
scraigen


Joined: 29/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 299
Location: Sheffield,
Quality would vary but lots of built kits on eBay at low prices.
Must build something
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Offline Marklineisenbahn  
#3 Posted : 08 August 2021 23:01:49(UTC)
Marklineisenbahn

United States   
Joined: 14/05/2011(UTC)
Posts: 281
Location: New York City
Hi there,
PM send long time ago.
Offline bgemski  
#4 Posted : 26 September 2021 15:50:29(UTC)
bgemski

United States   
Joined: 15/05/2003(UTC)
Posts: 168
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ
I believe Euromodeltrains.com in New Jersey may. I haven’t done business with them though.
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Offline Toosmall  
#5 Posted : 30 September 2021 13:35:06(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
I am a professional architectural model builder, retired now, building physical and 3D models.

Most people are surprised at the complexity, time and cost involved. A small marketing model of a block of units will take about 3 weeks to construct.

And that is if you get a good set of architectural drawing. Often I refused work because it simply wasn't worth dealing with shocking drawings. One could see where it would lead to. Not worth the stress.

The more detail on the model, the longer it takes to build.

You could get a model 3D printed. But it still has to be build as a working 3D model, a lot of work. I have seen some failures as the 3D model had mistakes with points and polygons. Every single one has to be exact.

Then painting, usually in separate parts for painting different colours. I have spent 3 days simply masking a model as it was too difficult to do separate parts.

Then you have glazing, you can only do so many windows per hour. Window frames, more time.

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Offline 5HorizonsRR  
#6 Posted : 30 September 2021 17:58:59(UTC)
5HorizonsRR

United States   
Joined: 05/12/2004(UTC)
Posts: 2,864
Location: CA, USA
Originally Posted by: Toosmall Go to Quoted Post
I am a professional architectural model builder, retired now, building physical and 3D models.

Most people are surprised at the complexity, time and cost involved. A small marketing model of a block of units will take about 3 weeks to construct.

And that is if you get a good set of architectural drawing. Often I refused work because it simply wasn't worth dealing with shocking drawings. One could see where it would lead to. Not worth the stress.

The more detail on the model, the longer it takes to build.

You could get a model 3D printed. But it still has to be build as a working 3D model, a lot of work. I have seen some failures as the 3D model had mistakes with points and polygons. Every single one has to be exact.

Then painting, usually in separate parts for painting different colours. I have spent 3 days simply masking a model as it was too difficult to do separate parts.

Then you have glazing, you can only do so many windows per hour. Window frames, more time.



I second the point above. I know several people who do it, but be prepared to pay for an artisans time, skills and expertise.
SBB Era 2-5
Offline mrmarklin  
#7 Posted : 01 October 2021 00:02:36(UTC)
mrmarklin

United States   
Joined: 27/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 890
Location: Burney, CA
Originally Posted by: 5HorizonsRR Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Toosmall Go to Quoted Post
I am a professional architectural model builder, retired now, building physical and 3D models.

Most people are surprised at the complexity, time and cost involved. A small marketing model of a block of units will take about 3 weeks to construct.

And that is if you get a good set of architectural drawing. Often I refused work because it simply wasn't worth dealing with shocking drawings. One could see where it would lead to. Not worth the stress.

The more detail on the model, the longer it takes to build.

You could get a model 3D printed. But it still has to be build as a working 3D model, a lot of work. I have seen some failures as the 3D model had mistakes with points and polygons. Every single one has to be exact.

Then painting, usually in separate parts for painting different colours. I have spent 3 days simply masking a model as it was too difficult to do separate parts.

Then you have glazing, you can only do so many windows per hour. Window frames, more time.



I second the point above. I know several people who do it, but be prepared to pay for an artisans time, skills and expertise.



Brima in Germany offers the service, I'm sure. But it won't be cheap. I would expect EUR several hundred for a medium sized model.
From the People's Republik of Kalifornia
Offline Toosmall  
#8 Posted : 01 October 2021 06:42:09(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
I built this 1:500 model a decade ago. It was over au$22,000.00 white painted so wasn't difficult to paint, but it had translucent glazing and stainless steel etched detailing.

1to500model.jpg
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Offline cookee_nz  
#9 Posted : 02 October 2021 10:10:00(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,953
Location: Paremata, Wellington
The way I read the request, the member (no name?) was looking for someone to assemble an already-produced kit - ie Faller, Auhagen, Kibri etc, rather than designing and constructing something from scratch.

Correct me if I'm wrong of course.

Either way, even a basic very simple kit can easily take an hour or two, and that's literally a 4-sided box with a base and roof.

Some station buildings are quite elaborate, and the more 'glass' there is (windows etc) the more fiddly it can be. nothing spoils a windows or join more than a run of glue or a smudge.

It would help a great deal for a reference to an existing model that was desired, or at least something close to it.

All the major manufacturers have their catalogue online or a simple google search for railway stations in the style you want would be a starting point.

The likelihood is that the labour to build the kit could easily exceed the cost of the kit itself. In the earlier years of Faller, they offered fully assembled versions of many of their models and they were definitely more expensive than the kits, because of the labour factor.

If you have a retailer you intend to purchase from, why not ask them?, they may be prepared to build it for you, or have customers they know to ask if they are interested.

But do be realistic about the time it will take and the possible costs. You might also consider approaching a local model-railway club if you have one in your area, they could either offer assistance or refer you on to a member willing to assist.

And don't overlook younger people. With the right guidance they may do an excellent job. Having young eyes and nimble fingers can make a big difference. But have them practice on a couple of test 'sacrificial' kits first to see what their skills are like.
Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
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Offline Toosmall  
#10 Posted : 02 October 2021 15:43:36(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
Some information on model construction in this thread which I posted.

https://www.marklin-user...sts/t27449-Glue-question

One of biggest headaches with a model is getting your head around drawings and building up a mental 3D image in your mind.

Once I built a model which took 12 weeks. Then they asked for a second copy which took 4 weeks, as I had mental picture of it. Later they wanted a third one, I was not happy as by now I was bored. Anyway, it took two and a half weeks.

Apart from been bored to tears I think if they had asked for a fourth one I could probably get it down to two weeks.

It is not the cutting of styrene and polycarbonate which is the issue. It is the drawings and building a 3D image in your mind, and you can have dozens of drawings for a single building.

Not to forget, you do need to check dimensions before you start, I have seen numerous errors. Work out a base RL (relative level) for the model.

Highrise, in some cultures they leave out floors with a number 4 in it (4, 14, 24, 34...), so you have to recalculate the height. Fiddling with level names, calling floors lower ground, basement 2 to suggest that the building is lower.

Roof plans which more often than not do not work. It all adds to the time it takes to finish a model. Let's not get onto the schedule of finishes!
Offline Toosmall  
#11 Posted : 04 October 2021 01:42:52(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
This is a "nothing" building, already spent a good days work on it. Made from 1mm styrene, no glazing yet. Will need to get some "Aral blue" or similar. Still need to make the pumps etc. So far the most fiddly bit is the Aral fascia board which has a split angle front face. Not really difficult, but basically fiddly. On one hand the fascia is a minor issue but as one looks at roofs on all scale models whether architectural or railway, it is worth putting in the effort on roofs... sadly! The actual metal roofing is separate from the fascia so I can paint it separately to save masking.

IMG_9580.jpg

IMG_7826-1.jpg

IMG_7826crop.jpg
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Offline David Dewar  
#12 Posted : 04 October 2021 12:49:49(UTC)
David Dewar

Scotland   
Joined: 01/02/2004(UTC)
Posts: 7,340
Location: Scotland
The fun is in the building. If you take your time and follow the instructions building is not difficult and mistakes can be rectified. IF looking for a station why not try just building a platform kit first which is easy. Faller have plenty to choose from. Give it a go and you might just enjoy building.
Take care I like Marklin and will defend the worlds greatest model rail manufacturer.
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Offline river6109  
#13 Posted : 04 October 2021 13:36:22(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 14,712
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Toosmal, will you be able to get cheaper petrol ?
https://www.youtube.com/river6109
https://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
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Offline hxmiesa  
#14 Posted : 05 October 2021 06:50:01(UTC)
hxmiesa

Spain   
Joined: 15/12/2005(UTC)
Posts: 3,520
Location: Spain
Originally Posted by: river6109 Go to Quoted Post
Toosmal, will you be able to get cheaper petrol ?

No, but filling it up will be only around 0,05 cents, because of the reduced size...

Best regards
Henrik Hoexbroe ("The Dane In Spain")
http://hoexbroe.tripod.com
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Offline Toosmall  
#15 Posted : 05 October 2021 07:09:03(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
Here is the raw 0.75 and 1.0mm styrene skeleton of the finished model. This is probably the hardest part of building the model. Initially turning two dimensions into three.

You have to look at what surfaces you can leave off to paint separately, like balcony tiles, roof surfaces, obviously glazing, louvres will be separate, balustrade whether glass or metal will be added later but you need to plan ahead so it can be attached in a presentable form, maybe a slot or held with a gap at the edge of the tiles.

The model is like a giant jigsaw puzzle, different colours, different textures like balcony tiles.

I couldn't separate all of this model, so had to mask off some of the brick surfaces. I will mask off balconies even though tiles go on top so paint doesn't build up.

Always spray paint the difficult corners first.

Fortunately these models are rarely lit, but if it is, it needs to be painted black inside when white.

For glazing you still need to build the model so it doesn't collapse but still have access to get the glazing in. Modern buildings with lots of glazing are difficult to build as there is lot less structure to hold it together. You do have to build a model with structural integrity.

I have often had feedback from builders and even architects that they refer to the model to see how the finished building will look like. The model maker finds the skyhooks in the architectural drawings!

A physical model has no option but to work. A 3D model you can get away with things not actually working.

It's a pain in the neck when architects have curves in their design. It takes 10 times longer to build. There are various tricks to help, but curves are more painful.

If the model needs custom metal etched balustrade or other features. This has its own lead time so you need to design that to fit the model, looking for all the architectural drawing mistakes.


1:200 scale model
_MG_7313.jpg

_MG_7332.jpg
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Offline Carim  
#16 Posted : 05 October 2021 08:14:41(UTC)
Carim

United Kingdom   
Joined: 15/09/2014(UTC)
Posts: 651
Location: London
What are the tricks with curves?

Carim
Offline Toosmall  
#17 Posted : 05 October 2021 09:50:19(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
Like 1:1 scale, build templates to form curve & laminate a few layers of thinner styrene.
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Offline Toosmall  
#18 Posted : 05 October 2021 22:27:41(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
An internal 1:100 model from a decade ago. A bucket load of work. The car & people were bought. Everything else started as basic styrene except for the real timber floor & some adapted etched stainless for the wine rack and growie. I used real timber here to get a realistic looking floor, a touch over scale, but it works well.

Bathroom tiles were individually masked for spray painting, a bit tedious. Internal doors were left off.

If you want detail you have to spend the time.

Internal model 1 to 100.jpg
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Offline Toosmall  
#19 Posted : 16 April 2023 03:27:56(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
It's over a decade since I bought any, from memory in Silverwater. But if you look up 'high impact styrene'. 1370 x 760mm or 2440 x 1220mm sheets, I always bought the smaller sheets, easier to do the cut. It's really cheap so don't waste energy trying to save every last piece.

0.75 & 1.0mm are the most used thickness, 1:200 models most 0.75mm. A sheet of 0.5mm (for laminating curves) & 1.5mm (for structural areas) is handy. You can roll up the sheets for transport, same with Forex (3mm is a bit stiff, 1 & 2mm is easy)

Forex is a brand name, it is foamed PVC, there are different qualities.

A sheet or 1mm polycarbonate for windows. If you want translucent glazing, back spray it.

Some suppliers (Australia, Sydney):
https://www.mulfordplastics.com.au

https://www.allplastics.com.au

https://www.perspexonline.com.au

1370 x 760mm
0.75mm $14.03
1.0mm $18.70

The styrene I usually cut of a 300mm wide piece x 760mm (Toledo (best ruler & mat finish) 1m ruler makes life easier), then cut that to, often, 150mm the other way. It is worthwhile cutting absolutely square so when you get down to the latter cuts you know you always have a square piece. Just saves time in the long run. I always remove the protection film from the whole sheet. Also usually work on the back of the sheet. Often give the polished side a light sanding.

An engineer's square is extremely handy for cutting edge.

If you need spray glue 3M Super77 (Eckersley's, while there get a scoring tool so you can make your own tiles etc) is the only one worth using. A can goes a very long way.


A small engineer's square is your third most used tool, a 150mm square is handy as well, but get a little one first. I have even cut a few of the 150mm rulers down for measuring inside of buildings for usually doing glazing.
default_75.jpg


This is for another project but one can't have too many Toledo rulers. For model making I have bent a few so they hold down more firmly on the surface.
_MG_6442_070050.jpg


Mentioned elsewhere, a Winsor Newton series 7 brush for solvents, start with a 0 or 1 size. They are the only brushes that last long term.
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Offline Toosmall  
#20 Posted : 18 April 2023 23:58:50(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
If you need to score horizontal lines, or tiles for that matter. Unless you have a drafting board, on the back of a couple of rulers stick tape to stick a sheet of high impact styrene with masking tape or whatever. About 150mm wide is the most or it gets really tedious, 200mm at a stretch (a drawing board about 400mm maximum). If you need tiles rotate 90°.

An Olfa P cutter 450 with V blade is ideal for scoring lines.

If you have some imperial rulers you have other spacing options. The V blade will locate in the steel ruler measurements for alignment. Use every second line on the ruler for wider spacing.

Toledo mat surface finish rulers are the best. Shiny rulers are not as easy to see the ruler markings. Rest the ruler up against the positioned scorer, one end then the other and score line.

DSC_1231_091902.jpg

DSC_12311_014449.jpg

DSC_0429_101353.jpg
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Offline Toosmall  
#21 Posted : 19 April 2023 03:53:29(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
Notes on tools:

You need an 'engineers square' it has a block on one side & the block needs to come close to the outside edge of the thin arm.
(Australia)
https://sydneytools.com....75mm-3-machinists-square
You use the square to cut off walls. Window openings you score one side, flex the styrene, then you see the stress crack on the back & the scalpel blade will follow the line. Then flex back & forth to pop out the piece for the opening. After practice you can get very thin widths between 2 openings.

Get a double sided ruler with imperial on the back, often they are cheaper anyway. If you start scoring tiles or lines, it gives you another range of different width markings.
(Australia)
https://www.totaltools.c...inless-steel-ruler-30012

(Australia, Sydney)
Hardware & General, industrial shop (top floor), Brookvale, have Toledo rulers.

Files not needed, make sanding blocks, much more useful.

A couple of nickel scalpel handles & a box or 2 of 10A blades.

A few tweezers. Blunt point, fine point. Later you may want to bend some to place things better. Often stabbing a small part with scalpel blade is quicker & easier than tweezers, especially dipping end in solvent.

Masking tape to tape styrene & rulers together, you are doing this quite often, the reason I have so many 300mm rulers, & also painting!

A cutting Matt, again a small one is all you need.

I don't really use a pin vise that often. A spike often is quicker.

A good area light, a couple of LED fluro types. Or just good window lighting with something to defuse the light a bit to get going.

Better that the desktop is darker for better contrast compared to the actual job. A piece of cardboard from newsagent will do. It is also to soak up excess solvent on tiny parts.
(cutting mat is 3 decades old)
A wide block if your solvent is in a jar so you don't knock it over, you can make a holder from some offcuts of styrene. Also make sure you have a bit of ventilation.


I do spread out when doing paid work (for multi story highrise buildings & other large complex models I stick a second copy of each drawing up on the walls for quick reference, sometimes the floor is also covered with drawings as well. Far easier that flipping through drawings on the screen. Often you need 2, 3 or 4 drawings at one time, usually because the architect has got it wrong & you are trying to work out what he is incapable of drawing, a regular occurrence!). There are other things on the table, but basically you really don't need a lot for building. The main tool is one's head!
DSC_0428_071912.jpg
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Offline Toosmall  
#22 Posted : 19 April 2023 04:36:37(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 614
Location: Sydney
If I haven't mentioned it, Tetrahydrofuran is the solvent for Forex - foamed PVC.

default_81.jpg


High impact styrene solvent:

IMG_20210810_075701077~2.jpg
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