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Offline Timnomads  
#1 Posted : 24 November 2015 12:37:45(UTC)
Timnomads

Switzerland   
Joined: 16/09/2015(UTC)
Posts: 266
Location: Grandvaux - Lausanne - Switzerland
Hi

I am about to start my first faller kit and bought some faller glue (with the thin metal tube applicator) the shop said if it blocks - to warm the metal tube with a BIC lighter, and he showed me how. it was at that point I noticed Highly flammable written in large letters on the bottle. Dooes anybody else use this method to unblock an applicator tube, is it safe or is there a safer method ?

TimMellow
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Offline RayF  
#2 Posted : 24 November 2015 12:42:59(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,796
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Hi Tim,

I do it all the time. It's the only way to unblock it sometimes.

Just be sure you've pulled the metal tube out of the plastic bottle before you apply a flame to it. You don't want to set fire to the whole bottle!
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
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Offline kweekalot  
#3 Posted : 24 November 2015 16:11:55(UTC)
kweekalot

Netherlands   
Joined: 27/06/2012(UTC)
Posts: 3,334
Location: Holland
I do it all the time too but I have never pulled the needle out of the bottle.

Marco
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Offline manou  
#4 Posted : 24 November 2015 16:44:05(UTC)
manou

Greece   
Joined: 21/11/2010(UTC)
Posts: 55
Location: Chalandri, Athens
I do it all the time also. Never pulled the needle out, i just squeeze the bottle a little and then i use the lighter at the tip of the needle.

Yannis
Best Regards
Yannis
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Offline JakDah  
#5 Posted : 24 November 2015 22:07:59(UTC)
JakDah

Denmark   
Joined: 10/10/2013(UTC)
Posts: 6
Location: Frederikssund

I use the small cleaning wire that comes with a smoke generator to clean the needle. Usually does the trick.
If you purchase the "Expert Laser" glue item no. 170494 there is a small cleaning wire included which also can be used.

Regards,
Jakob.
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Offline Webmaster  
#6 Posted : 25 November 2015 20:31:05(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 11,154
I myself pull the needle an give it a good campfire with a cigarette lighter, since I don't use the glue so often and it is properly dried up...
Once did put the needle back before it was properly cooled down - molten plastic at the needle base, needle popped out and a general mess it was when I squeezed the bottle... Blushing BigGrin

But you learn from your mistakes, and I am a bit more patient nowadays... BigGrin
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
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Offline Mark5  
#7 Posted : 25 November 2015 20:56:33(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,305
Location: Montreal, Canada
Can someone post a photo or link of what kind of glue we are talking about?
Is this a tin squeeze tube? What is meant by the "thin tube applicator"
I usually use the brush on Tamiya, of the Poly with a thin metal tube at end, but thats in a plastic bottle.
I use a copper wire inside the tube to keep it clean... are we talking about that kind of tube?
- Mark

DB DR FS NS SNCF c. 1955-65, fan of V200, electrics and steam, so hard to narrow down...
...signaling systems, yard traffic and shunting, Sommerfeldt catenary,
and station architecture (esp. stations from 1920-70).
In process: a new modular layout, track planning and drawing benchwork.
Email anytime or chat live: https://discord.gg/jAEKyTWQPQ
Offline waorb  
#8 Posted : 26 November 2015 14:07:48(UTC)
waorb

Brazil   
Joined: 31/05/2011(UTC)
Posts: 868
Location: Brazil
Hello Mark.

I think it's that kind below. Both of them have a metal needle. I personally don't like that kind of glue.

Cheers,

Walter

glue2.JPGglue1.JPG
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Offline Mark5  
#9 Posted : 26 November 2015 18:42:42(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,305
Location: Montreal, Canada
Thanks Walter,

I do use this glue occasionally but find the glue still runs out too much.
I put a bit down on a plate or palette and apply minute amounts with a toothpick if need be.
If with large amounts of areas need to be glued I find its not too bad.

Otherwise I find the brush on kind give more control and in thinner layers.
- Mark

quote=waorb;501880]Hello Mark.

I think it's that kind below. Both of them have a metal needle. I personally don't like that kind of glue.

Cheers,

Walter



DB DR FS NS SNCF c. 1955-65, fan of V200, electrics and steam, so hard to narrow down...
...signaling systems, yard traffic and shunting, Sommerfeldt catenary,
and station architecture (esp. stations from 1920-70).
In process: a new modular layout, track planning and drawing benchwork.
Email anytime or chat live: https://discord.gg/jAEKyTWQPQ
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Offline kweekalot  
#10 Posted : 26 November 2015 19:46:52(UTC)
kweekalot

Netherlands   
Joined: 27/06/2012(UTC)
Posts: 3,334
Location: Holland
I think the white-blue Faller expert bottle 174092 is by far the best glue, I don't like the orange bottle (super expert).

The Revell contacta glue gives more discoloration and stains, that show up after a few months.

Marco

(pictures are from Google ... not mine)


UserPostedImage UserPostedImage
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Offline sjlauritsen  
#11 Posted : 26 November 2015 20:16:22(UTC)
sjlauritsen

Denmark   
Joined: 18/08/2007(UTC)
Posts: 1,081
Location: Denmark
I too use a lighter. It works like a charm.
Søren from Denmark
Blog: https://railway.zone/ | Danish Model Railway Forum: https://baneforum.dk/
Offline Webmaster  
#12 Posted : 26 November 2015 20:49:52(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 11,154
Well, I have had the same white Faller bottle of glue as Marco shows but I also use the orange Faller bottle as well as Humbrol, Revell and UHU equivalents...

However, I also use my favorite lubricant for locos - the Faller oil with added teflon, also in a similar white bottle...

So once when I needed the lubricant to make a pair of scissors smoother to cut out decals for the marklin-users wagons,
I just took a white bottle from the shelf and applied it... I quickly noticed my mistake - I had taken the glue instead of oil... Blushing BigGrin LOL
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
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Offline Rocca  
#13 Posted : 06 December 2015 08:50:51(UTC)
Rocca

Italy   
Joined: 28/01/2004(UTC)
Posts: 601
Hello, friends,

I use the lighter too, without pulling out the needle!! My favourite, anyway, is the Vollmer glue (orange bottle)...just the best!

kind regards
Stefano Rocca

Offline Chipopo  
#14 Posted : 06 December 2015 10:43:08(UTC)
Chipopo

Israel   
Joined: 19/03/2012(UTC)
Posts: 105
I use the FALLER orange SUPR EXPERT and I am satisfied with the results
Offline bfriedland@cox.net  
#15 Posted : 25 February 2017 14:51:28(UTC)
bfriedland@cox.net

United States   
Joined: 02/10/2010(UTC)
Posts: 1
I use Faller glue too. I keep needle clear using the wire of a common bag tie with the paper stripped off. Works great.20170225_085004.jpg
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Offline baggio  
#16 Posted : 25 February 2017 15:39:24(UTC)
baggio

Canada   
Joined: 21/09/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,718
Location: Toronto
For the uninitiated (me Blushing ), can someone explain:

1. What practical difference is there between the glue discussed above and regular cheap glue?

2. To re-attach a little figurine that came off a platform when I moved it Scared , is it better to apply a very small tad of glue to the platform surface or to the bottom of the feet of the figurine (with a pin or needle)?

Thanks.BigGrin
Offline DaleSchultz  
#17 Posted : 25 February 2017 15:49:52(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
Originally Posted by: baggio Go to Quoted Post


2. To re-attach a little figurine that came off a platform when I moved it Scared , is it better to apply a very small tad of glue to the platform surface or to the bottom of the feet of the figurine (with a pin or needle)?

Thanks.BigGrin


For people, I use white wood glue. I put a dab of glue on some scrap, and then I touch the feet of the person in the glue, and stand them where needed.

The trick is to get just enough glue so that it is not visible when dry.
http://cabin-layout.blog...5/01/S-Bahn-Gleis-1.html

Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
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Offline michelvr  
#18 Posted : 25 February 2017 15:51:17(UTC)
michelvr

Canada   
Joined: 06/07/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,262
Originally Posted by: baggio Go to Quoted Post
For the uninitiated (me Blushing ), can someone explain:

1. What practical difference is there between the glue discussed above and regular cheap glue?

2. To re-attach a little figurine that came off a platform when I moved it Scared , is it better to apply a very small tad of glue to the platform surface or to the bottom of the feet of the figurine (with a pin or needle)?

Thanks.BigGrin


Going the cheap route gives you the cheap results! By using the right glue for the job you get professional results. As the saying goes a little dab will do! For figurines use the bottle with the needle applicator or use a wire and a little dab will do ya!

Michel
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Offline baggio  
#19 Posted : 25 February 2017 16:05:12(UTC)
baggio

Canada   
Joined: 21/09/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,718
Location: Toronto
I love your station, Dale, and your Knorr train (I have one, too). ThumpUp

Thanks to both of you for the feedback. BigGrin
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Offline Br502362  
#20 Posted : 25 February 2017 20:12:03(UTC)
Br502362


Joined: 05/03/2014(UTC)
Posts: 656
Location: Finland
Hi all,

I use 0,3mm piano wire. It is also used to steer linecontrol model planes.

WP_20170225_21_07_14_Pro.jpg

Cheers

Åke
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Offline Tex  
#21 Posted : 26 February 2017 00:23:04(UTC)
Tex

United States   
Joined: 30/01/2004(UTC)
Posts: 276
Location: Houston, Texas
The blue and white Faller expert shown by Marco in an earlier post is also my first choice. I am aware of how good it was now that I can no longer obtain it.
Tex
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Offline Jabez  
#22 Posted : 26 February 2017 22:28:48(UTC)
Jabez

Belgium   
Joined: 30/08/2016(UTC)
Posts: 636
Location: Brussels
Maybe I'm just cussed, but when a new product called Super-X is introduced alongside an existing good product called X, I tend to continue to favour X unless some very good reasons are given why Super-X is so super, and AFAIK in this case the reasons have not been given.
Jabez
I heard that lonesome whistle blow. Hank Williams
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Offline Minok  
#23 Posted : 27 February 2017 21:03:35(UTC)
Minok

United States   
Joined: 15/10/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,255
Location: Washington, Pacific Northwest
Under the term 'glue' there are several adhesives in different categories that are suited for specific purposes. Of course, what the manufacturers are for your country varies so you have to find the appropriate brand/source you can use.

1) PVA Glue (polyvinylacetate glue) - is the traditional white glue great for gluing porous items to other porous items - paper, wood, fabric, and when watered down for setting sand/gravel/balast and gluing down static grass, and scenery. This glue type drys clear but tends to be a bit brittle and doesn't work well for plastic or very small contact surfaces, or because it is more brittle, for joints that flex such as gluing foam to foam.

2) CA (cyanoacrylate) - aka super glue - is a very fast drying strong bond suited well for gluing very small items to other small surfaces, especially when not a lot of stress/strain will be applied to the parts. Tends to work well on all types of materials, though better if not too porous. Will cause fogging of transparent plastics (windows, etc) so a special 'clear' variety is needed if used around clear plastic windows.

3) E6000 - craft glue, some types of Uhu, comes in several colors (white, clear, etc) and sticks to all types of materials and dries to a pliable solid - good for anchoring of heavier things like trees with root bases, to wood or foam layout base.

4) hot glue - applied with hot glue gun - similar to E6000 except its heated to liquid and cools to a semi-pliable glued state. Also best used for decorating with some types of scenery, and adhering some types of foams/porous material.

5) Plastic Cement - such as the Faller, Revell, or Testor Model Master - are cements - they partly dissolve the plastic surfaces, which then intermingle on a molecular level as the cement's solvent evaporates and the plastic parts harden again, very solidly bonded. This glue is the best solution for building plastic models. They are designed to work with a specific type of plastic - that category used in plastic models. Think of the same thing as PVC cement used in assembling PVC pipes for water lines.

6) 2 component Epoxy - such as JB Weld, Pattex Stabilit Express, etc - where you mix two components of viscous/gel and another viscous/gel or powder, which starts the chemical bonding reaction... and over a few to several, that gel mix will harden to a super hard, well adhering solid epoxy. This is best for very strong bonds that you NEVER have to separate again. Not suited for delicate or small bonds.
Toys of tin and wood rule!
---
My Layout Thread on marklin-users.net: InterCity 1-3-4
My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Minok1217/
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Offline DaleSchultz  
#24 Posted : 04 April 2017 04:22:16(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
nice summary of the glue types.

I just got a Faller kit and it is a Lasercut kit. It contains some cardboard, wood and plastic parts. (for the plastic to plastic joints I will use plastic cement)

Faller of course suggests using their 170494 EXPERT LASERCUT product. Not exactly easy to find in the woods of Maine. It is described as multipurpose glue.

Does anyone know which of the 6 categories above it falls into? I am guessing the E6000 category.

Doing google searches on glue to use for lasercut models I came across WeldBond.
Would WeldBond be a similar glue ? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RM70OGE

Any other suggestions on good glues for lasercut models?
Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
Offline Legless  
#25 Posted : 04 April 2017 10:24:50(UTC)
Legless

Australia   
Joined: 20/07/2007(UTC)
Posts: 809
Location: Leopold, Victoria
Weld bond is a very sting PVA glue. Excellent for wood , glass, tile, cement and hard plastics.
Legless
Era's 1 to 111,C track,k track
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Offline DaleSchultz  
#26 Posted : 04 April 2017 22:16:22(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
Originally Posted by: Legless Go to Quoted Post
Weld bond is a very sting PVA glue. Excellent for wood , glass, tile, cement and hard plastics.


Thanks! I have a bottle of it arriving Wednesday!
Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
Offline baggio  
#27 Posted : 05 April 2017 01:37:26(UTC)
baggio

Canada   
Joined: 21/09/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,718
Location: Toronto
What about simple "hot glue" that is a lot more economical? Check the dollar stores.

Not adequate for the purpose? (There are different types, however, perhaps it may be a matter of getting two types.)
Offline Minok  
#28 Posted : 05 April 2017 02:19:02(UTC)
Minok

United States   
Joined: 15/10/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,255
Location: Washington, Pacific Northwest
Originally Posted by: DaleSchultz Go to Quoted Post

Faller of course suggests using their 170494 EXPERT LASERCUT product. Not exactly easy to find in the woods of Maine. It is described as multipurpose glue.


Based on the description and bottle look, I'm going to guess its a basic white PVA glue. The benefit of theirs is it comes in that bottle, with its needle like applicator, which allows for a more precise application, than you would get, say from a USA Elmer's Glue bottle. Might be thinner too (and quicker setting than Elmer's style white PVA).
Toys of tin and wood rule!
---
My Layout Thread on marklin-users.net: InterCity 1-3-4
My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Minok1217/
Offline Roland  
#29 Posted : 05 April 2017 04:25:14(UTC)
Roland

Canada   
Joined: 09/11/2013(UTC)
Posts: 319
Location: Toronto, Canada
Originally Posted by: baggio Go to Quoted Post
What about simple "hot glue" that is a lot more economical? Check the dollar stores.



Originally Posted by: michelvr Go to Quoted Post
Going the cheap route gives you the cheap results! By using the right glue for the job you get professional results.


Offline Legless  
#30 Posted : 05 April 2017 09:34:41(UTC)
Legless

Australia   
Joined: 20/07/2007(UTC)
Posts: 809
Location: Leopold, Victoria
With the PVA glues in Australia for strength are as follows.
White PVA glue is medium.
Beige Builders PVA glue stronger.
Weldbond stronger. (PVA)
Bondcrete stronger. (Used in cement). PVA
Silasec stronger. (Again used in cement). PVA
Polyurethane glue strongest. It foams up, filling up gaps).
Or Araldite 2 pack epoxy. (24 hr best)
Legless
Era's 1 to 111,C track,k track
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Offline PJMärklin  
#31 Posted : 05 April 2017 09:49:36(UTC)
PJMärklin

Australia   
Joined: 04/12/2013(UTC)
Posts: 2,093
Location: Hobart, Australia
Originally Posted by: Minok Go to Quoted Post

Based on the description and bottle look, I'm going to guess its a basic white PVA glue.


Hello,

I wanted a rustic garage for the works vehicles on an upper (coal mine) level of my layout
and found a nice Faller one when searching for other buildings in Germany a few years ago.
When I got home I initially felt a bit put out in that I discovered that it was "lasercut" made of wood and that I would have to obtain some different glue.
I thought it was just PVA ("white glue") but this did not work well and eventually I obtained the Faller Lasercut glue. It is not simply white glue but seems also to have some added latex-like element. It sets more quickly than PVA (but much more slowly than the various plastic glues we use.)


Ultimately I was satisfied with the material and appearance of the completed kit; also the faller "lasercut" glue :


UserPostedImage



UserPostedImage



I think I still prefer to work with plastic building kits.


Regards,

PJ
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Offline DaleSchultz  
#32 Posted : 07 April 2017 19:12:26(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
The WeldBond is white and rather thick. It takes an hour to dry (up to 24) - not suitable at all for kit building.

A friend is mailing me some glue he bought in Germany called BINDAN-RS a fast setting wood glue.

I will also add a bottle of Faller lasercut expert glue to my next train order.
Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
Offline Isatri  
#33 Posted : 17 October 2018 13:38:10(UTC)
Isatri

United States   
Joined: 17/10/2018(UTC)
Posts: 1
Location: New Jersey, North Bergen
Sorry for bumping...just my two cents...

I believe that superglue (cyano) is the thing for resin. My favourite of this brew is Hafixs Professional Glue, which was recommended to me by Ivan Smith many years ago. I buy it online, usually a couple of bottles at a time so it's always there. I keep it on the bench and seems to last a very long time. I have never had a problem with it going off, it just gets quite thick as it gets old, (which turns it into a sort of gel, useful like that). I also use Deluxe Materials Roket Tricky Stick when bonding awkward materials (not just styrene, which it's intended for) and this seems to help the stuff achieve a good bond.

With any cyano, a close fitting joint is important, so if you can't achieve that, a gel type cyano is useful, as has been said. I always used to use Loctite Superglue and Loctite Superglue Gel, (simply because I used to work for the store that sells it and I have a retirement discount card!) but recently the formula has changed and it doesn't seem quite as good. I seem to recall that many, many years ago there was an excellent article in one of the older magazines about the use of cyano, and it spoke of holding joints together and introducing the glue into the joint and allowing it to wick in, as you would with solvent. I have a vague feeling it may have been written by Will Litchfield of this parish, but memory may be playing tricks...

As for epoxy, my favourite remains Plastic Padding Super Steel https://besttoolexpert.com/glue-for-plastic/ (the yellow tubes available from Halfords, accept no other) which is truly wonderful stuff. It mixes to a stiff dark grey paste which stays where it is put and goes off quite quickly, and because it's grey you can see where you've put it. With a cocktail stick for mixing it's very easy to use very small amounts, which might help you, David, with assembly of joints without glue going all over the place - although you will still have to hold the joint still for a few minutes until it starts to go off. Once it's started to cure you can cut any surplus away with a sharp blade, or trim it later with a blade or file. A great bonus is that you can squeeze an inch (say) of adhesive and hardener onto a square of glossy card (from old cereal packets, David Dornom's idea) and just mix a little as you need it. The remainder can be used over a period of days by removing the skin that forms on the grey adhesive. On plastics and suchlike it's not quite so good, but I always roughen the surfaces and sometimes even brush some of the aforementioned Tricky Stick, which seems to help even though it probably shouldn't.
There are a lot of cool YouTube videos on this subject, here’s one of them.Good luck
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Offline amartinezv  
#34 Posted : 18 October 2018 17:46:19(UTC)
amartinezv

Spain   
Joined: 25/08/2004(UTC)
Posts: 307
Location: Madrid,
Originally Posted by: JakDah Go to Quoted Post

I use the small cleaning wire that comes with a smoke generator to clean the needle. Usually does the trick.


Regards,
Jakob.[/quote

Me too
Antonio Martínez
marklin, IB, era 3, Train controller
www.raildigital.es/davidruso
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