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Offline kimballthurlow  
#1 Posted : 20 September 2022 00:32:49(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Here is a challenge.

I came across a book with some details of a Buttterwagen designed and built for the DRG in 1927 and 1930.
There were about 30 or so of these wagons and as you can guess they carried butter.
Specifically they were used out of Schleswig-Holstein (the area in northern Germany near the Danish border).
That was famous for its dairy industry which supplied many parts of Germany.
Apparently these wagons were part of the Deutsche Post fleet, and could carry ice and butter from Flensburg to Leipzig in under 12 hours to best preserve the contents.

The wagon seemed to be based on the Gl type of Dresden wagon modelled by Märklin extensively in Z, HO and 1 gauges.
I would like to have a go at modifying a Gl wagon in the HO scale.
The major requirement is the insertion of recessed side doors (with window) at one end, much like one end of the typical Gepackwagen Pwi used in Donnerbuchsen consists.
There is a small window above a brake-wheel bulge at this end of the wagon.
Then add steps for the doors.
There are also 4 roof vents similar to those on Donnerbuchsen cars between the side door and the recessed door only.

The Gl wagon example in HO #00794:

Gl

The Pwi wagon example in HO showing the recessed end doors #4103.
With acknowledgment to Michelstaedter Modellbahntreff:

4103

Maybe I will get around to it one day and run it with my excellent #4329 Post set for era II.
With acknowledgment to Michas-Bahnhof:
4329


Kimball

Edited by user 21 September 2022 09:22:04(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline applor  
#2 Posted : 20 September 2022 04:25:16(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,560
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Good luck!
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#3 Posted : 20 September 2022 06:37:37(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Thank you Eric,
I am very inclined to do this but a project for another time, because I am busy at work.
Mind you Märklin could save me the trouble by releasing a newly tooled Butterwagen.

I would start with this wagon which comes from a Märklin set 48812. Sometimes they come up on eBay.

1. Put dummy hinges on the 2 doors, so that each side has two hinged doors with a latch in the middle,
2. get rid of the sliding door channels,
3. cut out the small end window,
4. add the brake wheel bulge and
5. fashion the recessed door from styrene.
That means the only real bashing is cutting out 2 corners of the wagon with a razor saw.
6. Then add clear material to doors and windows, steps below the door, and that would do me.

With acknowledgment to benontspoord.nl.

48812-Dresden

regards
Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline Toosmall  
#4 Posted : 20 September 2022 08:09:26(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
It may be easier to pull the top half off and rebuild it. At least it is all square, except for the roof which I would laminate, with dichloroethane solvent, out of 0.5mm high impact styrene sheet around a cylinder until the solvent has gone off properly. Then cut down to size, length and width. 3 or 4 layers.

The restaurant car is not made in Z gauge so I made one: https://www.marklin-user...7265-ICE-Bord-Restaurant

Ideas here which might help building up the 3 dimensional object with styrene: https://www.marklin-user...sts/t47774-Z-gauge-buses

For flush glazing put a tiny step inside the styrene sheet to sit the glass up against. Otherwise it is very difficult to position precisely.
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#5 Posted : 20 September 2022 09:33:38(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Originally Posted by: Toosmall Go to Quoted Post
.... the roof which I would laminate, with dichloroethane solvent, out of 0.5mm high impact styrene sheet around a cylinder until the solvent has gone off properly. Then cut down to size, length and width. 3 or 4 layers.
.....
For flush glazing put a tiny step inside the styrene sheet to sit the glass up against. Otherwise it is very difficult to position precisely.



Hello Toosmall,

The roof of the Butter wagon is the same profile as the Gl, so I dont need to create the roof material.
Thanks for the tip on the glazing, the clear material must then be cut reasonably precisely.
regards
Kimball

HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline river6109  
#6 Posted : 20 September 2022 15:08:21(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 14,062
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
These days I get my butter from the supermarket

https://www.youtube.com/river6109
https://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
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Offline Toosmall  
#7 Posted : 20 September 2022 22:26:26(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
Originally Posted by: river6109 Go to Quoted Post
These days I get my butter from the supermarket

On the 15th Aldi closed a store in Sydney which we used, the property owner upped the rent. Now we have to go elsewhere for butter. No trains in our part of Sydney to get butter!
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Offline Toosmall  
#8 Posted : 20 September 2022 23:08:27(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
Originally Posted by: kimballthurlow Go to Quoted Post
Thanks for the tip on the glazing, the clear material must then be cut reasonably precisely.
regards
Kimball

For windows cut a strip to a common dimension, scoring each side with scalpel blade (10A are my favourite https://www.marklin-user...-Scalpel-blade-quality).

Then with with say 240 grit sanding boards (wet and dry glued both sides with 3M Super 77 to 1mm Forex, expanded PVC). Sand window to the exact size. Cut off to length and sand ends.

Cut sanding boards to width to tidy up tight spaces.

DSC_1226_065355.jpg
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#9 Posted : 21 September 2022 00:03:41(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Apparently Dingler produced a HO model exactly according to the book.
..... Except for the lettering panels along the side.
But they are as rare as rocking horse sh...

This photo is of the Dingler. It was also produced with the lettering on the panels - REICHSPOST KÜHLWAGEN.

Dingler post van

here is the book description of this wagon.
The Bavarian group administration of the DRG for use by the Deutsche Reichpost has ten Post refrigerated wagons for transporting butter as Post-cl/10.8 type


regards
Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline Toosmall  
#10 Posted : 21 September 2022 01:35:32(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
If you need to score horizontal lines, or tiles for that matter. Unless you have a drafting board, on the back of a couple of rulers stick tape to stick a sheet of high impact styrene with masking tape or whatever. About 150mm wide is the most or it gets really tedious, 200mm at a stretch (a drawing board about 400mm maximum). If you need tiles rotate 90°.

An Olfa P cutter 450 with V blade is ideal for scoring lines.

If you have some imperial rulers you have other spacing options. The V blade will locate in the steel ruler measurements for alignment. Use every second line on the ruler for wider spacing.

Toledo mat surface finish rulers are the best. Shiny rulers are not as easy to see the ruler markings. Rest the ruler up against the positioned scorer, one end then the other and score line.

DSC_1231_091902.jpg

DSC_12311_014449.jpg

Edited by user 21 September 2022 05:46:58(UTC)  | Reason: Add close up photo

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Offline kimballthurlow  
#11 Posted : 21 September 2022 09:18:19(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Hi Toosmall,
Thanks for the tips on scoring.
I found double sided tape immeasurably useful in doing or holding all sorts of jigs or for repetitive work or adhering piece by piece articles.
Have you ever noted when buying cheap $2 steel rulers that the graduations do not start perfectly from the end of the rule?

Alba book 1986
Page 233

The photos above show the relevant information in the book.
The book was published in 1986.
The smell of the book (which came brand new in plastic wrapper) takes me back 40 or more years when I ran a bookshop.
Sublime!!!

I am putting some thought into how best to build this.
Obtaining the Dingler wagon is the priority, because it is perfect.
Bashing a Märklin or Roco wagon is the plan B option.

Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline Alsterstreek  
#12 Posted : 21 September 2022 10:03:18(UTC)
Alsterstreek

Germany   
Joined: 16/11/2011(UTC)
Posts: 5,342
Location: Hybrid Home
Dunno if this helps: Dingler presented the design in 2008 - see photo.
http://www.muehlenroda.d...l/dingler3_DSC_0785.html

There are two article numbers for versions with different lettering, 010213 and 010226. Source (2018 German post with photos): https://www.altemodellba...wagen-Deutsche-Post.html

While not available anymore on his website, this German dealer description might be helpful for future online searches:
https://www.modellbahn-r...t-kuehlwagen-post-2-ovp/
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Offline Toosmall  
#13 Posted : 21 September 2022 11:36:42(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
Originally Posted by: kimballthurlow Go to Quoted Post
Have you ever noted when buying cheap $2 steel rulers that the graduations do not start perfectly from the end of the rule?

Kimball

Can't recall buying a non Toledo ruler!

_MG_6442_070050.jpg
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#14 Posted : 22 September 2022 00:43:13(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Originally Posted by: Alsterstreek Go to Quoted Post
Dunno if this helps: ....


Thank you Ak.
I followed those links and have enough now to embed a search for the Dingler.
Thanks
Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#15 Posted : 05 November 2022 07:34:29(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
An update on my project to build a DRG Butterwagen early November 2022.

From the description of the real wagon shown in the book, you will see that this was the 1930 version.
There was also a 1927 version - but more on that later.

(Plan B option from Post #11 above)
Not having any real hope of finding the Dingler model anytime soon, I decided to build one from parts available.
I rather relished the idea of some modelling and keeping myself from idleness.

First I sourced (from one eBay seller in Germany) 4 of the Roco 4217 wagons, all equipped with KKK couplers.
From these 4 I will be able to build 1 of the 1930 Butterwagen with plenty of left-overs for other projects.
These wagons were painted green for running in passenger trains, so there will be minimal preparation required for painting.
The wheel base, frame, end doorways, brake compartment and roof are perfectly in accordance with the plans.
The roof is a clip-in piece and that and the window glazing material are removed first.
Here is the Roco model.
Roco 4217

Firstly I chose one model to put aside as the BASIS for adding new sides and finishing the new model.
The complete sides (apart from the brake compartment end) were removed, retaining the integral under-roof body frame to preserve the integrity of the build.
And the chassis with wheels, weight and coupler mechanism was put aside.
Here is the separated body showing the under-roof cross members as manufactured.
BASIS body unit

This next picture is rather important, because it shows the metalplate jig I used to accurately slice off the sides.
This is done to preserve the clip-in receptors for the roof and the frame integrity.
Gluing on the new side sections as they are assembled will be more precise with the clean separation.
(Tin snips for making the jig and screwdriver for prising off the roof)
Slicing the sides with metal template

I will update this topic as I progress.
(Postscript: The Roco model 4217 is also available under model #44255 - I am unsure if it is any different).
Kimball

Edited by user 07 November 2022 06:13:41(UTC)  | Reason: added extra photos

HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#16 Posted : 07 November 2022 06:12:09(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
More work to achieve the 1930 Butter wagen:
As the last process of creating the BASIS model the sides are completely removed.
This takes some patience but is rewarding when achieved precisely.
Because I used the metal jig (or template) and using continous light strokes with different shaped blades from both top and inside of the join, a clean separation was possible.
The vertical cuts were done inside the riveted corner straps (an easy line to follow with the knife)
Some strengthening pillars on the inside required removal with a VERY sharp carpenters chisel.

Don't be worried about messing up - you have another 3 models that can be used.
BASIS Sides removed

The other three models require removal of side material only in that end area opposite the brake compartment end and shown here in red outline.
The same is done on the other side of the wagon.
These removed pieces are then split up using a sharp scalpel and rejoined to form one section.
So I end up with 4 sections altogether to form the new sides from the corners, then add doors in the middle space.
The hinged doors will be made as a perfect fit using side material available from at least two of the other models.
UserPostedImage

I did a mock up on one of the model shells before finalising the sections on the BASIS unit.
These side sections are rejoined at the brake end corner faithfully according to the plans.
(See Post #11 above for plans and photo).
Here is the test side section showing the integral under-roof body frame kept to preserve integrity, and showing a useful strengthening plastic piece in white.
UserPostedImage

More later as I progress.
Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline Toosmall  
#17 Posted : 07 November 2022 19:56:48(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
When glueing with solvent, brace structure with formwork and support, especially overnight. It will stop sides bowing in. Often I will very lightly tack in a temporary "floor or ceiling" to hold walls square.

You can also pre score a floor or ceiling both sides, but don't actually remove the centre section, while assembling the structure it holds everything in shape. Then when access is required peal out the scored section like opening a can of sardines.

Building up a box you need to think of it as a construction site and formwork to keep everything in place.

If using large sheets of high impact styrene, cut off 300mm wide sections, then cut off say 100 or 150mm off that to work with. Always cut absolutely square to start with, it helps later on. An engineer's square is great as a square cutting edge for your scalpel. My favourite blades are 10A Swann Morton, which come in a box of a 100. The price up front might be a bit daunting, but like good wine, the quality is appreciated!

https://www.marklin-user...81-Scalpel-blade-quality
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#18 Posted : 08 November 2022 08:23:42(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Originally Posted by: Toosmall Go to Quoted Post
When glueing with solvent, brace structure with formwork and support, especially overnight. It will stop sides bowing in. Often I will very lightly tack in a temporary "floor or ceiling" to hold walls square.
..... An engineer's square is great as a square cutting edge for your scalpel. My favourite blades are 10A Swann Morton, which come in a box of a 100. The price up front might be a bit daunting, but like good wine, the quality is appreciated!

https://www.marklin-user...81-Scalpel-blade-quality


Hello Toosmall,
Thanks for the tips.
I could use the temporary floor idea, but then maybe it will be just as easy to use the model chassis floor to achieve that.
Integrity is assured because I already have the ceiling integral in the BASIS body shell.
I do use a small engineers square.

I have always used the hobby knives like Stanley (that was a long time ago), Excel or even the cheap blade knives from the $2 shops.
Sometimes they can be frustrating.
I would not mind getting some good quality scalpels and will follow up on your suggestion.

As an aside I have a new respect for the Roco model manufacture.
In these wagons Roco uses a cast block for weight (brilliant) and the plastic is soft enough to do quite precise cuts.
I started with a razor saw but quickly discarded that idea as unnecessary.

I will almost certainly do dry runs on the side assembly before gluing, and use an old oven door glass plate which ensures it glues and dries flat.

Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
Offline kimballthurlow  
#19 Posted : 15 November 2022 05:46:10(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Further progress.
These next few photos should whet your appetite if you faintly desire to do something similar.
But let me tell you from the outset, it is quite time consuming, and fiddly.
And honesty bids me tell you that there have been some re-runs, un-gluing, re-packing, re-gluing, scraping, measuring and re-measuring.

So to recapitulate.
1. Choose one wagon on which to completely remove the sides (except for the brake end and the under-roof frame and ends). This becomes the BASIS for everything.
2. The other three wagons are used for more replacements by cutting and rejoining sections and NOT the complete sides.

I will describe how the cutting and rejoining can be done. I won't say should be done because there are probably other ways just as good.
Here is a complete new side set up on the chassis and with the door remaining to be done.
(See post #11 for plans and prototype photo)
Notice the glass sheet - it was used both for gluing the parts together and to keep the body aligned under weight while the glue dried

Complete new side

Here we have the BASIS body shell, set up as one complete unit with under-roof frame and body ends all intact and as moulded by ROCO.
Both sides of the BASIS will be set up this way leaving the door to be manufactured from other planked side material.
The beautiful thing about this is the the width of the door is not a critical measurement.
It will be the space as shown here.
Whether that is the prototype width is a detail with which I shall not concern myself.

You might notice a misalignment at the top of the door space.
This will be aligned at final gluing with the door in place.

Now we can get to some detail about how these sections were cut.
Remember this new side took material removed from BASIS, and material from ONE other wagon.
Both complete sides were already removed from the BASIS wagon, but the cuts are the same (or similar).
Here is some detail from both sides of that ONE wagon as cut.
Side One cuts
SIDE ONE - The sense is the "under-roof frame" is a word - do not read it as though I am saying from under the roof frame.

The red lines are cuts. I used a scalpel/hobby knife following the natural barrier of the strapping as modelled by ROCO.
So a ruler was not required.
A final cut on the inside as exact as you can makes the snap-off fairly easy.

On the right hand section you can see how I cut around part of the door frame.
This is important because it supplies the detail of the frame and door hinges etc. for the right side of the door.
The left hand section becomes the adjacent right hand piece to the right hand section.
Side two cuts

SIDE TWO -
On the LEFT hand section, like Side One I cut around part of the door frame.
That supplies detail of the frame and door hinges etc. this time for the left side of the door.
The right hand section need not be cut out because you already own one from the cuts on SIDE 1.
(Because you now have the frame and hinges for the door, the same will not be required from the BASIS sides).

I can probably slice off one or both of the destination/loading label holders?
And I can probably re-glue one in a better place if they slice off cleanly using a chisel blade or a wood chisel.
I guess there should be only one on each side.
And I will remove the excess door-bumpers for the opened doors.

That will suffice for now.
I expect I will not do much more for a week or so because other chores beckon.
Thank you.
Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
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Offline Toosmall  
#20 Posted : 15 November 2022 07:19:19(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
Do not cut things off with chisels unless desperate and then chisel is sharpened with Arkansas translucent sharpening stone.

Use a 10A scalpel blade, cutting many times. Make up a jig or jigs to guide blade. Cut a hole in plastic sheet to hold main piece, glue screw or whatever to hold everything precisely. It can often take hours to make a jig for a simple job. But it will solve multiple further headaches.

150mm Toledo rulers are handy for guides. I have even cut one up for a guide. Double sided tape is also handy.
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#21 Posted : 15 November 2022 07:35:11(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Originally Posted by: Toosmall Go to Quoted Post
... then chisel is sharpened with Arkansas translucent sharpening stone.

....


I agree .... jigs are amazingly useful and save time and often fingers from injury.

Gee I have not heard the term Arkansas stone for 40 years - my father was a real tool man, and sang its praises often.

I do find a wood chisel works for this reason:
1. You have a better grip on a wood chisel handle than a small blade holder.
2. You have much more purchase on guiding the blade, a bit like a longer lever.
3. You are not using muscles in fingers, wrist and fore-arm alone, but upper arm as well.

Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
Offline Toosmall  
#22 Posted : 15 November 2022 08:42:54(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
Agree, jigs = keeping fingers!


If you need to do end cutting then yes a wood chisel.

Arkansas translucent sharpening stones are super fine. Quality old chisels will have steel that you can maintain an edge like a razor blade.

Arkansas stone, they are not cheap, but the sharper the chisel the less likely you are to cut yourself.
1998612376192118629.jpg
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Offline Toosmall  
#23 Posted : 15 November 2022 22:39:34(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 328
Location: Sydney
I always hated doing changes to architectural models regardless of the money involved. I knew, because the nature of the beast I would always cut myself, and on this one cut myself a number of times.

This job we finished ready to deliver as required (as always). The customer said the landscaping was wrong and this was a major part of the model. There was a debate over the drawings.

Anyway we agreed to do all the changes and discuss the cost later. The job was already extremely urgent originally. It took another week to re build the model. Just couldn't do it any quicker as we were utterly stuffed from the original deadline with some 24 hours of continuous work. Not only medical people do this.

Did all the changes in a week and were just about to deliver the model, sent photos to the customer. The customer phoned back, could you return the model to how it was originally built.

Many cut fingers and took three months to recover from the exhaustion.
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Offline river6109  
#24 Posted : 16 November 2022 05:17:38(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 14,062
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
What a nightmare, as they say, the customer is always right,

John
https://www.youtube.com/river6109
https://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#25 Posted : 10 December 2022 06:14:20(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,375
Location: Brisbane, Australia
I wish to bring this project to a close, so here is the final result which I am mightily pleased with.

The doors were fabricated from other siding parts available on the sacrificial wagons.
The width of the doors is not critical.
They simply fill the space that is available after assembly and gluing the six-part sides.
Remember I left the actual door framing on part of the cut-out side sections. This really adds to the door authenticity.
With judicious additions of small plastic strips to represent door bottom, and handles the job is done.

After assembly and gluing all the side components, the vents in the top middle of the roof and the chimney were removed. The roof was sanded back smooth and repainted using a Tamiya spray can Luftwaffe Violet Gray (sic) AS4.
The steps were fabricated from left-over Trix Express HO metal wagon parts.
The body was painted with Tamiya spray can Luftwaffe Green AS24. I have used similar colour Humbrol 66 for brushing, but over such a large body expanse the spray gives a smoother result.
I think it looks a bit like a DRG faded brown/green.
UserPostedImage


That pretty much finished the wagon except for touch-up black on solebar and door hardware, and decaling.
The door windows should be framed and coloured buff. I have 0.5x0.38mm Evergreen strip which should do that.
I have noted a gap in the left corner at opposite end from the brake compartment and that can be filled from the inside.
Maybe there should be a horizontal bar at mid-height on the right hand door, and I will fix that if further research suggests it.
UserPostedImage


The numbers and genus for this wagon were 14 675 to 14 679 c/10,8 Augsburg as built in 1930.
I have my suspicions that the available decals will be for the 1927 build but I will let you know when I get them.


In summary I think the wagon looks rather austere and perhaps uninteresting when compared to the original Roco 4217 with windows and doors.
But in my head, as a model of a wagon built for a very particular purpose it will certainly make a passenger train one little bit more realistic.
UserPostedImage

Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail HO (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail OO (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge - Live Steam 90mm (3.1/2 inch) gauge.
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kimballthurlow
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