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Offline Valdamikill  
#1 Posted : 26 October 2019 23:37:35(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Hello all,

I have recently inherited a VERY large collection of Marklin trains. Primarily HO scale, but a large amount of Z scale as well. Also many trains from other companies (Roco, Liliput, Athearn, Roundhouse, etc, etc...)

I have been spending months trying to organize what I have and figure out what I have. I haven't really used Marklin trains since I watched my Dad when I was a kid. I've been lurking on here for a while trying to jog my memory about how things work.

I have a few questions, and I'm sure many more after. I'm sure some of these questions are pretty basic, but I'm starting at pretty much square one, so I hope you can bear with me.

I'm not sure where to start, but here goes a few of the things I've been trying to figure out.

So I've set up a very basic track set up...it's the M series track, mostly 5106 type with a few basic curves. I have the bumper stops at each end as I'm using a countertop and don't have enough room for a full loop.

I've got a bunch of old transformers that work, so no problems there.

As for the track, as I said I'm using the 5106 type, but I also have a lot of track with the third rail in the middle. Are those interchangeable? Is that a completely different system than the type of track I'm using now?

I keep reading about DC trains and AC trains...or something like that. How do I know which train is which?

Are there certain cars that should be used on different track/systems?

I've also read about changing the wheels of certain cargo cars to DC or AC...I have no idea what that means.

In testing some of the locomotives, I can not get any of the ones with pantographs to work on my current small countertop setup. Obviously I am doing something wrong or they're not designed for what I'm doing. Do I need catenary to get them to work? Is there any way to test those trains without catenary to see if they're in good condition still? When I have them on the current track, the lights turn on, but the train won't move if that helps at all.

I'm sure I'll have a million more questions, but I think that's enough for now.

Thanks so much!
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Valdamikill
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#2 Posted : 26 October 2019 23:47:38(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,352
Location: New Zealand
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
As for the track, as I said I'm using the 5100 type, but I also have a lot of track with the third rail in the middle. Are those interchangeable? Is that a completely different system than the type of track I'm using now?


Welcome to the forum.

Yes they are interchangeable. What you have is older M track which had a solid centre rail.

Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
I keep reading about DC trains and AC trains...or something like that. How do I know which train is which?

Are there certain cars that should be used on different track/systems?

I've also read about changing the wheels of certain cargo cars to DC or AC...I have no idea what that means.


Marklin analog trains run on 19v AC. The centre rail is your positive power, the two outside rails are the return or ground or earth. AC wagons have axles that have no electrical isolation between the wheels.

Trains that run on DC are generally 2 rail, but that term is not mutually exclusive - you could run DC trains on 3 rail with the appropriate DC power supplies and locos. Two rail systems carry the electrical supply with one rail being positive and the other rail the return. DC wagons therefore have axles that electrically isolate the two wheels. You therefore can't run AC wagons on a 2 rail setup because they will short the rails, but you can run DC wagons on AC 3 rail (with some limitations) . This is why some dealers offer a service to swap AC/DC axles on wagons for the other type.

Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
In testing some of the locomotives, I can not get any of the ones with pantographs to work on my current small countertop setup. Obviously I am doing something wrong or they're not designed for what I'm doing. Do I need catenary to get them to work? Is there any way to test those trains without catenary to see if they're in good condition still? When I have them on the current track, the lights turn on, but the train won't move if that helps at all.


Many Marklin electric locomotives (but not all) have a switch that switches power pickup between the pickup shoe and the overhead pantographs. You will need catenary if you want to run locos from the pantographs plus a separate transformer to feed power to the catenary. You then change the locos switch to whichever you want. You will find the switch/lever that does this underneath the loco.
Offline cookee_nz  
#3 Posted : 26 October 2019 23:57:09(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,475
Location: Paremata, Wellington
First off, welcome. You've come to the right place.

Some photos would help us guide you better (add using the paper clip attach icon) but briefly yes you can mix the solid and stud centre rail track types.

Marklin3-rail is almost always AC. The Z-gauge 'Mini-Club' on the other hand is DC, two-rail. Any two-rail H0 system will also be DC. The Trix system produced by Märklin is 2-rail DC.

Regarding the Locos with Pantographs, there is a small lever near the wheels which is to select whether the Loco will get its power from the track, or the overhead. Usually the lever slides up and down, up for overhead, down for track, but some move front to rear. The original leaflet for the Loco will show the lever, assuming you were lucky enough to get the matching boxes and leaflets.

The Loco will of course need to still have the centre rail slider fitted to work from the track.

Be very careful with the transformers, the old blue metal-case units are prone to the rubber power cord perishing and they become very dangerous.

Cheers and keep the questions coming

Steve
Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
Offline cookee_nz  
#4 Posted : 26 October 2019 23:58:06(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,475
Location: Paremata, Wellington
Ha the Kiwi's are in sync this morning - Snap!!
Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by cookee_nz
Offline Valdamikill  
#5 Posted : 27 October 2019 00:23:41(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
Marklin analog trains run on 19v AC. The centre rail is your positive power, the two outside rails are the return or ground or earth. AC wagons have axles that have no electrical isolation between the wheels.

Trains that run on DC are generally 2 rail, but that term is not mutually exclusive - you could run DC trains on 3 rail with the appropriate DC power supplies and locos. Two rail systems carry the electrical supply with one rail being positive and the other rail the return. DC wagons therefore have axles that electrically isolate the two wheels. You therefore can't run AC wagons on a 2 rail setup because they will short the rails, but you can run DC wagons on AC 3 rail (with some limitations) . This is why some dealers offer a service to swap AC/DC axles on wagons for the other type.


First, thanks for replying and providing this information. I'm not trying to be obtuse, but I'm still not sure I understand completely.

So if I use any Marklin HO wagons on my Marklin HO track - there is no issues because all Marklin HO wagons are AC, correct? The swap of axles would be if you want to use Marklin wagons on another non-Marklin system...do I have that right? There's no need to swap axles if everything is staying Marklin?

Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
Many Marklin electric locomotives (but not all) have a switch that switches power pickup between the pickup shoe and the overhead pantographs. You will need catenary if you want to run locos from the pantographs plus a separate transformer to feed power to the catenary. You then change the locos switch to whichever you want. You will find the switch/lever that does this underneath the loco.


Ok, I will look for the switch. If I am getting lights on the loco but no movement, is that likely because the switch is set for power from the pantographs? Again, thanks so much!
Offline Valdamikill  
#6 Posted : 27 October 2019 00:27:13(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Originally Posted by: cookee_nz Go to Quoted Post
First off, welcome. You've come to the right place.

Some photos would help us guide you better (add using the paper clip attach icon) but briefly yes you can mix the solid and stud centre rail track types.

Regarding the Locos with Pantographs, there is a small lever near the wheels which is to select whether the Loco will get its power from the track, or the overhead. Usually the lever slides up and down, up for overhead, down for track, but some move front to rear. The original leaflet for the Loco will show the lever, assuming you were lucky enough to get the matching boxes and leaflets.

The Loco will of course need to still have the centre rail slider fitted to work from the track.

Be very careful with the transformers, the old blue metal-case units are prone to the rubber power cord perishing and they become very dangerous.

Cheers and keep the questions coming

Steve


Thanks Steve,

I will take some photos and attach them when the kids are in bed. That is great to know regarding the transformers. I have about 20 of the blue ones, so I'll have to be careful for now. If I ever get around to building a more permanent setup, I will look for replacements.

Could you provide an example of a newer transformer that I should be on the lookout for?

Thanks again!
Offline cookee_nz  
#7 Posted : 27 October 2019 01:15:49(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,475
Location: Paremata, Wellington
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
Marklin analog trains run on 19v AC. The centre rail is your positive power, the two outside rails are the return or ground or earth. AC wagons have axles that have no electrical isolation between the wheels.

Trains that run on DC are generally 2 rail, but that term is not mutually exclusive - you could run DC trains on 3 rail with the appropriate DC power supplies and locos. Two rail systems carry the electrical supply with one rail being positive and the other rail the return. DC wagons therefore have axles that electrically isolate the two wheels. You therefore can't run AC wagons on a 2 rail setup because they will short the rails, but you can run DC wagons on AC 3 rail (with some limitations) . This is why some dealers offer a service to swap AC/DC axles on wagons for the other type.


First, thanks for replying and providing this information. I'm not trying to be obtuse, but I'm still not sure I understand completely.

So if I use any Marklin HO wagons on my Marklin HO track - there is no issues because all Marklin HO wagons are AC, correct? The swap of axles would be if you want to use Marklin wagons on another non-Marklin system...do I have that right? There's no need to swap axles if everything is staying Marklin?

Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
Many Marklin electric locomotives (but not all) have a switch that switches power pickup between the pickup shoe and the overhead pantographs. You will need catenary if you want to run locos from the pantographs plus a separate transformer to feed power to the catenary. You then change the locos switch to whichever you want. You will find the switch/lever that does this underneath the loco.


Ok, I will look for the switch. If I am getting lights on the loco but no movement, is that likely because the switch is set for power from the pantographs? Again, thanks so much!


If you are getting lights but no movement then you have power.

The most likely cause is that the Loco has seized over the years from lack of use. The oil has dried and become hardened like glue.

You have two options.

1: Perform a full strip-down and clean of the Loco to flush out the old oil and re-lubricate. This is a thorough overhaul and will usually give the best result, but, it is time-consuming to do, you need to have the correct tools and also the skill and patience, and be nimble with your fingers. And there is always the risk of breaking a wire , losing a small part etc etc.

2: Free the seized wheels/gears/motor and oil where necessary.

In your case, I would definitely take option 2!! Most people can do this themselves.

What you will need to do is remove the Loco body so that you can access the motor. Usually you will see a large gear between the motor armature and the wheels. Some Loco's have 2-3 gears between the armature and the wheels.

In the worst case, everything is gummed up but usually it is not that serious.

** NOTE: Do NOT attempt to free the Loco by forcing the wheels, this may cause damage.

In my own experience, I have had several Loco's like this, either ones I have purchased second-hand, or that I have serviced for friends. In most cases, I have been able to free up the Loco by turning (with fingers) the large gear located beside the motor assembly to release the hold from the dried oil. You should be able to rotate the gear fully and see all the wheels turn freely for at least several full revolutions.

Put a very small drop of oil on the motor axle each end, plus on the gear axles, and the wheel axles, this will help free it up. Now test the Loco under power. If it still will not run then there is a further issue to check. if the gears/wheels turn partially then just lock solid, there may be something jamming, possibly some grit in the gears, or on a Steam Loco, possibly the couplings or valve-linkages are fouled up.

If you can't seem to free it, try another Loco, this is one of those procedures you learn by experience and some may be stuck more firmly than others. And some will have sat for 40+ years, never touched and still work perfectly first time.

Once you have got the Loco running, I would recommend to let it run at a medium speed for a good 5-10 minutes and for this you are going to need at least a circle or oval of track. This will warm the Motor up and help distribute the oil better.

Regular use is the key here. If you get a Loco freed up, then let it sit untouched for a long time (several months/years), it may seize up again.

This is not really a problem with modern synthetic oils, more common with older organic oils.

Some very old Loco's have an unusual reverse mechanism which allows you to put the Loco into an 'idle' state where the lights will come on but the Loco does not drive. Simply activating the reverse operation from the controller will sually advance the reverse mechanism to the next cycle.

I would start with your simplest Locos first to give you a feel for how they should run. Most of the older Loco's have the body held on by a single screw either in the roof, or underneath. But some more advance models may have the screws hidden under a removable cap, or may have screws underneath front and year. Usually the body will come off easily, but not always. If it seems reluctant, set it aside, then ask here specifically about that Loco.

Just take your time BigGrin
Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
Offline mike c  
#8 Posted : 27 October 2019 01:21:57(UTC)
mike c

Canada   
Joined: 28/11/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,665
Location: Montreal, QC
I would start by making the trip to either John's Photo (Danforth) or Westend Trains and ask either Randy (John's) or Mike (Westend) whatever questions you may have.
You can also get in touch with the Ontario Marklin Group, many of whom are members in this forum.

As far as the trains. As AC uses the third (centre) rail for power and both rails for ground (return), any locomotive, coach or car that is equipped for AC operation will cause a short circuit if the uninsulated wheels come into contact with both plus and minus rails of a 2 rail DC setup.

As far as the locomotives with catenary... If the lights go on, that means that the locomotive is getting power and the issue is NOT the track/catenary switch.
I presume that some of the locomotives may need some maintenance as the oil may have hardened. Talking to Mike or Randy would be a good way to assess this.

If you are not sure whether the wheels are insulated or not, take a multimeter and set to ohms (resistance). Place the black and red probes on the wheels. If the readout remains 0.00, the wheels are insulated (suitable for DC). If you get a different result, it is because the wheels are not insulated or are somehow bridged and probably for AC use only.

Regards

Mike C
Offline Valdamikill  
#9 Posted : 27 October 2019 02:34:44(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Originally Posted by: mike c Go to Quoted Post
I would start by making the trip to either John's Photo (Danforth) or Westend Trains and ask either Randy (John's) or Mike (Westend) whatever questions you may have.
You can also get in touch with the Ontario Marklin Group, many of whom are members in this forum.

As far as the trains. As AC uses the third (centre) rail for power and both rails for ground (return), any locomotive, coach or car that is equipped for AC operation will cause a short circuit if the uninsulated wheels come into contact with both plus and minus rails of a 2 rail DC setup.

As far as the locomotives with catenary... If the lights go on, that means that the locomotive is getting power and the issue is NOT the track/catenary switch.
I presume that some of the locomotives may need some maintenance as the oil may have hardened. Talking to Mike or Randy would be a good way to assess this.

If you are not sure whether the wheels are insulated or not, take a multimeter and set to ohms (resistance). Place the black and red probes on the wheels. If the readout remains 0.00, the wheels are insulated (suitable for DC). If you get a different result, it is because the wheels are not insulated or are somehow bridged and probably for AC use only.

Regards

Mike C


Thanks for the advice Mike. Maybe next time I'm in Toronto, I'll make a detour to one of those shops.

If all the Marklin track I'm using is AC, then do I need to worry about the AC/DC wheel situation?
Offline Valdamikill  
#10 Posted : 27 October 2019 02:39:39(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Ok, as requested here are a few photos of my small basement countertop setup. It's just setup to test some of the locos.

I was very interested in getting the 3015 Crocodile working which thanks to your guys help, I was able to do. However, it is not very smooth. It sometimes jolts forward, sometimes it stops and needs a small nudge to get going again. Also, when it is at the far end of the setup, it sometime will not reverse unless I again give it a small nudge.

I was also getting some sparks at one point as well. Is this a simple maintenance issue or is there something else going on?

Also, for oiling the locos that haven't been used in years/decades, is there a youtube video or something available I could check out?

Thanks!

IMG_3112.JPGIMG_3111.JPGIMG_3113.JPG
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#11 Posted : 27 October 2019 02:19:33(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,352
Location: New Zealand
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
If all the Marklin track I'm using is AC, then do I need to worry about the AC/DC wheel situation?


No, if all of your locos and wagons are Marklin then you don't need to worry. If you have other make wagons you should be able to run them OK on Marklin track. Using non Marklin couplers with Marklin couplers can give some grief, as can the smaller wheels flanges of some non Marklin wagons. Best thing to do is try and see.


As for Youtube videos on maintaining Marklin locos, our forum member Martin from Sweden provides this video

There is also a Marklin Service Manual which I've attached to this post. Also, Marklin locos come with a service / user manual for that particular loco. If you don't have the manual(s) we may be able to post copies for you. I don't have one for a 3015 Crocodile (the loco in your picture) but someone on the forum may be able to provide a copy.




Marklin 0733 Service Manual Vers B.pdf (11,534kb) downloaded 21 time(s).

As for your transformer, your particular one is from the 1970's so may be OK. The old 280A transformers from the 50's/60's were bad for the rubber insulating material in the transformer's cord breaking down and exposing bare wires which will lead to an electrocution risk. You can check your transformer by taking the mains plug off the transformer (unplugging it from the mains supply first!) and checking the state of insulation material of the cord at that end. If there are any signs the insulation has cracks or deteriorated in any way, have the transformer checked and or the cord replaced by an electrician.
Offline PJMärklin  
#12 Posted : 27 October 2019 04:57:01(UTC)
PJMärklin

Australia   
Joined: 04/12/2013(UTC)
Posts: 1,567
Location: Hobart, Australia
Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
I don't have one for a 3015 Crocodile (the loco in your picture) but someone on the forum may be able to provide a copy.


3015 Manual (English starts page 7):


1.jpeg2.jpeg3.jpeg4.jpeg5.jpeg6.jpeg7.jpeg8.jpeg9.jpeg


UserPostedImage


Have FunBigGrin
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by PJMärklin
Offline Martti Mäntylä  
#13 Posted : 28 October 2019 00:31:20(UTC)
Martti Mäntylä

Finland   
Joined: 15/11/2018(UTC)
Posts: 154
Location: Uusimaa, Helsinki
First, welcome to the forum also on my behalf!

Working your way through a VERY large collection of locomotives and other stuff will be a long-term project, so I trust that you have the time and patience it will require. Learning how to service the locomotives will be necessary: they will all run better if you can give them a good overhaul.

The 3015 is one of the more tricky models to work with, so you may prefer to get started with simpler ones such as the 3000, 3003, or 3005 (if the collection includes these ones). They can be disassembled quite easily and the skills learned from working with them are transferable to other models.

I would recommend getting in your hands original Märklin lubricant (item 7149). You will also find it useful to have a bottle of isopropyl alcohol to clean jammed gears and like. Obviously you will need proper tweezers, side cutters, etc. The Märklin tool set (item 70900) is practical in the sense that it contains nut drivers specifically fit to work with steam locomotives, but of course you gan get similar tools from elsewhere. You will also eventually need spare tires, replacement brushes, lamps, and other small stuff like that. Fortunately, all these are easily available even for the old locomotives.

You say that the Crocodile may stop and then needs a small nudge to keep going. The problem may be simply that it has lost good electrical contact with the track. This can be simply tested by replacing the suspect 5106 with another. If the track turns out to be the culprit, it most often can be fixed by removing any dirt or rust that may be present. Also the pickup shoes underneath the loco may have issues - you can try to clean them up a bit (for this, isopropanol is great).

In any case, I personally envy your position - I find it great fun to get these old locomotives back in working shape again! One of the most attractive aspects of the old analog locomotives is that it is actually relatively easy to fix them, as long as there is no severe mechanical damage present.
- Martti M.
Era III analog & digital (Rocrail, CAN Digital Bahn, Gleisbox/MS2, K83/K84), C & M tracks, some Spur 1
Offline Valdamikill  
#14 Posted : 28 October 2019 01:25:54(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Originally Posted by: Martti Mäntylä Go to Quoted Post
I would recommend getting in your hands original Märklin lubricant (item 7149). You will also find it useful to have a bottle of isopropyl alcohol to clean jammed gears and like. Obviously you will need proper tweezers, side cutters, etc. The Märklin tool set (item 70900) is practical in the sense that it contains nut drivers specifically fit to work with steam locomotives, but of course you gan get similar tools from elsewhere. You will also eventually need spare tires, replacement brushes, lamps, and other small stuff like that. Fortunately, all these are easily available even for the old locomotives.

You say that the Crocodile may stop and then needs a small nudge to keep going. The problem may be simply that it has lost good electrical contact with the track. This can be simply tested by replacing the suspect 5106 with another. If the track turns out to be the culprit, it most often can be fixed by removing any dirt or rust that may be present. Also the pickup shoes underneath the loco may have issues - you can try to clean them up a bit (for this, isopropanol is great).


Thank you for the warm welcome Martti.

I will take your recommendation on starting to practice maintenance on the 3000 model. I definitely have those available to work with.

As for the lubricant - is there an easily obtained alternative to the original Marklin lubricant?

Also, I appreciate your suggestion regarding the 5106 track. There are several locos that do not have any problems along the same track, so I am thinking that it may be dirty contacts?

Thanks again!
Offline Crazy Harry  
#15 Posted : 28 October 2019 04:18:19(UTC)
Crazy Harry

Canada   
Joined: 18/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 370
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
As for the lubricant - is there an easily obtained alternative to the original Marklin lubricant?


Firstly, welcome to the forum Valdamikill! Good luck with your inheritance.

Labelle brand oils have been recommended on this site in the past for both H0 and Z scale models, see these threads for example:

H0 locomotive rehabilitation post #2

Z locomotive rehabilitation post #3

I don't have any experience with Labelle, since I still have a 50 year old bottle of Marklin 7199 oil.

Labelle products are available in Streetsville (Mississauga), Ontario at the Credit Valley Railway Company Ltd. (CVRCO website) a hobby shop specializing in trains. They do not have any Marklin items, but almost everything else. It's worth a look at this place!

Where are you in the Toronto area? I noticed in a previous post that you don't get in Toronto often where Westend Trains and John's Photo are located. There are a few Marklin fans throughout the Greater Toronto Area, maybe someone could give you some hands on help?

Cheers,

Harold.


Offline Valdamikill  
#16 Posted : 28 October 2019 13:51:30(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Originally Posted by: Crazy Harry Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post
As for the lubricant - is there an easily obtained alternative to the original Marklin lubricant?


Firstly, welcome to the forum Valdamikill! Good luck with your inheritance.

Labelle brand oils have been recommended on this site in the past for both H0 and Z scale models, see these threads for example:

H0 locomotive rehabilitation post #2

Z locomotive rehabilitation post #3

I don't have any experience with Labelle, since I still have a 50 year old bottle of Marklin 7199 oil.

Labelle products are available in Streetsville (Mississauga), Ontario at the Credit Valley Railway Company Ltd. (CVRCO website) a hobby shop specializing in trains. They do not have any Marklin items, but almost everything else. It's worth a look at this place!

Where are you in the Toronto area? I noticed in a previous post that you don't get in Toronto often where Westend Trains and John's Photo are located. There are a few Marklin fans throughout the Greater Toronto Area, maybe someone could give you some hands on help?

Cheers,

Harold.





Thanks Harold. I will check out those threads and the Labelle oil.

I am in Durham Region - It would be a roughly one hour drive (if I get a miracle and have decent traffic on the 401 Laugh) to Westend or John's Hobbies. Probably an hour and a half each way with traffic the way it usually is.

George's trains in Markham is much closer. 20-30 minute drive. I might reach out to him first and see if he carries the Marklin supplies that have been recommended.
Offline Crazy Harry  
#17 Posted : 28 October 2019 14:42:32(UTC)
Crazy Harry

Canada   
Joined: 18/11/2008(UTC)
Posts: 370
Location: Oakville, Ontario
Originally Posted by: Valdamikill Go to Quoted Post

I am in Durham Region - It would be a roughly one hour drive (if I get a miracle and have decent traffic on the 401 Laugh) to Westend or John's Hobbies. Probably an hour and a half each way with traffic the way it usually is.

George's trains in Markham is much closer. 20-30 minute drive. I might reach out to him first and see if he carries the Marklin supplies that have been recommended.


I used to commute to Pickering from Oakville for work (Ontario Power Generation) so I know the traffic pains in our area.

I haven't been to George's in decades, they had little or no Marklin stock. They will have the Labelle oils. They can probably order Marklin items through Walthers'. But, if you have to wait for an order, I suggest you use Westend Trains and have Mike ship the order to you.

I noticed in your Crocodile photo that the wheels and slider are discoloured, either deposits or corrosion. This would be a cause of the jerky running and sparking. They need a good cleaning (or just replace the sliders/pick-up shoe). The track will probably need some cleaning as well. Are there traction tires on the Crocodile (little rubber tire on a few of the large wheels with flanges, if not you will see a groove in them)?

Anyway, keep plugging away at the hobby and post your questions (and photos) here - someone will always respond with useful suggestions.

Cheers,

Harold.
Offline Tom Jessop  
#18 Posted : 28 October 2019 22:00:59(UTC)
Tom Jessop

Australia   
Joined: 14/12/2002(UTC)
Posts: 843
Location: Newcastle NSW Australia


While out shopping include a track cleaning rubber , then you can give each piece of track a couple of wipes which will do wonders to a lot of the problems . It can also be used on the pick up shoe on each loco & make for better use of each train .




Cheers Tom in Oz .
Offline Valdamikill  
#19 Posted : 21 January 2020 00:05:38(UTC)
Valdamikill

Canada   
Joined: 26/10/2019(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Ontario, Toronto
Hello,

I am going through my collection...selling some...keeping some...but I have a question about a certain locomotive.

I believe it is a 3021 (as that is on the train), but it is all in silver. I have not seen another one like it. I am thinking it has been custom painted, but that seems unlikely. Is it possible that all the red/blue have worn off?

If you could take a look and let me know, that would be appreciated!

Thanks.

IMG_5274.JPGIMG_5270.JPGIMG_5273.JPGIMG_5275.JPGIMG_5272.JPGIMG_5276.JPGIMG_5271.JPG
Offline IanC  
#20 Posted : 21 January 2020 03:36:17(UTC)
IanC

United Kingdom   
Joined: 05/03/2016(UTC)
Posts: 160
Location: England, Bedford
My guess would be that someone has used paint stripper to take it back to the base metal. Can I recommend WD40 for freeing up seized wheels and improving electrical contacts? And can I point out that some oils will damage your paintwork so use sparingly and wipe off the bodywork.

May I say how impressed I am by the help, knowledge and generosity shown by the members above. What a great world-wide community to be a part of. I'm proud to be associated with you all.

IanC
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by IanC
Offline cookee_nz  
#21 Posted : 21 January 2020 04:56:26(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,475
Location: Paremata, Wellington
Originally Posted by: IanC Go to Quoted Post
My guess would be that someone has used paint stripper to take it back to the base metal. Can I recommend WD40 for freeing up seized wheels and improving electrical contacts? And can I point out that some oils will damage your paintwork so use sparingly and wipe off the bodywork.

May I say how impressed I am by the help, knowledge and generosity shown by the members above. What a great world-wide community to be a part of. I'm proud to be associated with you all.

IanC


I agree with this. Those 3021's are heavy, and were quite popular so there's no shortage of them and they are often found play-worn, paint chips, dents etc.

It was either stripped back as a possible candidate for repainting, or just left like it is because they liked the look of it.

Without knowing how it looked prior, it's anyone's guess whether it now looks better or not. One thing is certain, a 'bad' repaint will always look worse than even a very rough original. BigGrin
Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#22 Posted : 21 January 2020 07:22:55(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,352
Location: New Zealand
This is how a 3021 should look.

7.jpg

8.jpg
Offline hxmiesa  
#23 Posted : 21 January 2020 08:33:35(UTC)
hxmiesa

Spain   
Joined: 15/12/2005(UTC)
Posts: 2,928
Location: Spain
Could the 3021 be part of a "Metall Edition"?
I know that Märklin sometimes would do this for displays for shops. (and collectors?)

Best regards
Henrik Hoexbroe ("The Dane In Spain")
http://hoexbroe.tripod.com
Offline cookee_nz  
#24 Posted : 21 January 2020 09:17:25(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,475
Location: Paremata, Wellington
Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
This is how a 3021 should look.



Lol - yes I know how one 'should' look, I was meaning without knowing how that specific one looked - prior to stripping LOL LOL

Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#25 Posted : 21 January 2020 09:37:25(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,352
Location: New Zealand
Originally Posted by: cookee_nz Go to Quoted Post
Lol - yes I know how one 'should' look.....


I know that you know what a 3021 looks like, but then I didn't make that post for your benefit....Wink
Offline nhumps  
#26 Posted : 21 January 2020 11:32:16(UTC)
nhumps

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/12/2018(UTC)
Posts: 12
Location: Wellington
Originally Posted by: Bigdaddynz Go to Quoted Post
This is how a 3021 should look.


Not quite the same road number there ;)
Offline kiwiAlan  
#27 Posted : 21 January 2020 21:47:24(UTC)
kiwiAlan

United Kingdom   
Joined: 23/07/2014(UTC)
Posts: 5,238
Location: ENGLAND, Didcot
Originally Posted by: hxmiesa Go to Quoted Post
Could the 3021 be part of a "Metall Edition"?
I know that Märklin sometimes would do this for displays for shops. (and collectors?)



No, it is too early for a metal edition, they didn't come until the MHI items started IIRC, and this year is the 30th anniversary of MHI, the loco in question goes back to the 1960s.

Also Metal Edition models are given a silver paint coat, the are never the base casting metal in appearance which is what this one appears to be, or else has had a coat of battleship grey paint as it is quite shiny (see the reflections of the lamps on the noses).

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