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Offline Ian555  
#1 Posted : 17 April 2012 13:43:25(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi all,

I thought we could list all the important points to remember when building a new layout.

I'll get us started with these 2.

Alway's remember that your Loco/coaches/wagons will derail at the most awkward section of your layout for access.

All your track problems...electrical/cleaning/overhead/shorts will be at the most awkward section of your layout for access.

Ian.

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Offline Ian555  
#2 Posted : 17 April 2012 13:49:41(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi all,

And here's another point to remember when building a new layout...

Strange, I could fit/get into that space under the layout last year, with no bother.

Ian.

Offline petestra  
#3 Posted : 17 April 2012 15:25:39(UTC)
petestra

United States   
Joined: 27/07/2009(UTC)
Posts: 5,729
Location: Leesburg,VA.USA
Hi, I think that Ian has hit the nail on the head with a very important point. Access, access, access! You will
sooner or later have to get to all points of your little world. Years ago I used to use a stool to get up on the
layout and and put my knees in a free area and climb about but at 59 now those days are over. Although
I have pretty much kept a boyish figure you have to make life easier on yourself for cleaning, wrecks (I hardly
ever have any except for hard to reach places LOL ), and redoing scenic material. Plan ahead with the
trackplan. I used the Marklin track software, 1st edition 1.0 version. German knowledge really helps if
you learn model railway vocabulary. I made about 5 or 6 layouts before I decided on the one that offered
for me the most play value. Happy planning.
PeterSmile
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Offline river6109  
#4 Posted : 17 April 2012 15:25:57(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 13,733
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Hi, here are a few points of interest regarding this topic

My layout was build in the 80's and getting onto the layout was no problem, going through the excess holes climbing onto the steelframe and walking along free spaces.
Today, sometimes I'm standing still and suddenly loose my balance (just joking) but walking onto the boards these days is not easy, I'm telling you.

Although my layout is 1m high, getting underneath the layout isn't that simple either.

As you all know or most of you my digital layout is of considerable size and therefore has a considerable amount of wires underneath the boards.
In the early stage of building my layout, I realized putting 2 wires underneath the boards wans't my cup of tea, mainly because if you have a short on your layout the whole thing goes out, including your signals, turnouts and any other solenoid or elelctrical connection.

So I came up with the idea of separating the circuits for k 83's and the main track contacts.
Secondly I have now installed a waorking Overhead system which needed an extra wire, than all my tunrouts are powered by a separate powersupply and also all my braking models have also a separate powersupply, that is ok and I can handle it.
What I can't handle is some of the wiring was done years ago and since than I have updated it in dribs and drabs and everytime I go underneath the boards I think, what is this wire for.
My suggestion is make sure right from the beginning, to start an accurate method of how your wiring is done and it shouldn't effect the young and lively.

As mentioned before also, my layout is build on a module design and has been shifted in the past, sometimes 250km away from Perth by truck. What is ok today but maybe in 20 years down the road your timber frame or platform isn't as even as it used to be it has started to sag, so make sure you have enough supports, although my modules consisted of a steelframe the inside was empty and since than I have added internal supports for the board itself and it is back to 100%.
Most of you also may not have reached the age some of us have and therefore my examples may niot be relevant but in 20 or 30 years or so, if you still remember this topic you may put the important things into your design now and it saves you a lot of headaches.
What was a first digital layout in 1984 with stop and start sections has now developed into a digital nightmare paradise as expressed by Dyusan and Dale at their latest club meeting. So what worked fine one day doesn't work suddenly another day, especially when you tamper with digital locos with different functions, different ways of programming them and the list goes on.
and last if you design a smaller layout, the task will be simpler and less stressful, especially on your budget.

regards.,

John
https://www.youtube.com/river6109
https://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
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Offline Ian555  
#5 Posted : 17 April 2012 16:08:35(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi all,

So, with only 4 posts on this topic, we can already clearly see that the 2 points that cause us the most problems with our layouts (access and wiring),are in fact, points that are hardly spoken about on our forum, well apart from John's "short's".

And this brings us to another very important point.....

How well built should you're framework for the layout be....and how long do you see it lasting.

Ian.



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Offline kbvrod  
#6 Posted : 17 April 2012 20:50:10(UTC)
kbvrod

United States   
Joined: 23/08/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,597
Location: Beverly, MA
Hi Ian,all,

So, with only 4 posts on this topic, we can already clearly see that the 2 points that cause us the most problems with our layouts (access and wiring),are in fact, points that are hardly spoken about on our forum, well apart from John's "short's".And this brings us to another very important point.....How well built should you're framework for the layout be....and how long do you see it lasting.Ian.<

You missing a few things laddie,...BigGrin
1)what type of layout?Home,built in? Something in my flat/apartment,that I may have to dismantle? Modules that I can pack and move?A shelf layout?
2) access/wiring: if you have tracks/scenery you can not reach you better have a contingency plan on how to that.A topside 'creeper' is one good option or a another mate holding you by your trousers as you lean over the layout! "Hamish,you got me?" "Aye!" LOL
wiring:test everything before you put in on the layout,I I don't mean just touching the wires to make sure a point works!Decoders,plugs,the lot.
3)framework:consider how much anyone spends on trains/track/etc,.....why not? One can reuse materials,....

Off the soap box and the high horse!Flapper

Dr D






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Offline hennabm  
#7 Posted : 17 April 2012 20:52:51(UTC)
hennabm

Scotland   
Joined: 22/09/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,938
Location: Edinburgh,
Hi all

just my penny's worth;

you will need more than you thought. Never buy just enough as something will go wrong and more will be neededRollEyes

Be that scenery or track.Wink

Mike
1957 - 1985 era
What's digital?
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Offline Ian555  
#8 Posted : 17 April 2012 21:15:47(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Kevin,

Thanks for your input, lots of valid points. ThumpUp

Can I ask, how do you know about Hamish.Wink

Ian.
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Offline Ian555  
#9 Posted : 17 April 2012 21:22:16(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Mike,

Very good advice. Smile ThumpUp

Ian.



Offline kbvrod  
#10 Posted : 17 April 2012 21:32:32(UTC)
kbvrod

United States   
Joined: 23/08/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,597
Location: Beverly, MA
Hi Ian,all,

>Thanks for your input, lots of valid points. ThumpUp <

Thanks,....Blushing

>Can I ask, how do you know about Hamish.Wink <

Hamish Davidson,I competed against him the Highland Games, Heavy Events back in the 80's.Strong and stout lad,fun to be around.I remember pouring ale down our throats after a match and trying to figure out what he was saying!LOL

Dr D



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Offline GTSE800  
#11 Posted : 18 April 2012 00:34:28(UTC)
GTSE800


Joined: 07/03/2006(UTC)
Posts: 74
Location: RI
One point I think is very important that i read a long time ago , Less is more!
Very easy to go overboard with track.
Been there, done it and then on did it .
GTSE800
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Offline petestra  
#12 Posted : 18 April 2012 01:04:38(UTC)
petestra

United States   
Joined: 27/07/2009(UTC)
Posts: 5,729
Location: Leesburg,VA.USA
Yes, I believe this is true. On some of my past layouts I had far too many yards which I really liked but they did take away from areas where buildings could have been. Even though I don't have a hidden station on my current layout I do feel that they are important, especially to digital operators. Peter
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Offline drstapes  
#13 Posted : 18 April 2012 01:12:46(UTC)
drstapes

United Kingdom   
Joined: 23/08/2004(UTC)
Posts: 764
Location: Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk
Why is it that when you go to bed everything is working perfectly but next day nothing works at all...........

Regards

Geoff (UK)

marklin HO from the 50's and 60's
Offline GTSE800  
#14 Posted : 18 April 2012 02:27:43(UTC)
GTSE800


Joined: 07/03/2006(UTC)
Posts: 74
Location: RI
Originally Posted by: drstapes Go to Quoted Post
Why is it that when you go to bed everything is working perfectly but next day nothing works at all...........



OMG I had to LOL on that one (So true)

GTSE800
Offline DigitalNZ  
#15 Posted : 18 April 2012 02:51:28(UTC)
DigitalNZ

New Zealand   
Joined: 13/12/2011(UTC)
Posts: 228
Location: Masterton, New Zealand
I'd have to agree with the access! Recently my pet problem is C track turnout motors which really need to be accessed from underneath. Work perfectly one day, not the next and always when you want to show someone something!
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Offline Ian555  
#16 Posted : 18 April 2012 06:59:23(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Originally Posted by: drstapes Go to Quoted Post
Why is it that when you go to bed everything is working perfectly but next day nothing works at all...........




Hi Geoff,

That happens to me alot and also with the model railway. LOL

Ian.

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Offline Ian555  
#17 Posted : 18 April 2012 07:01:34(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi all,

Looks like ACCESS is moving into number one position. ThumpUp

Ian.

Offline GlennM  
#18 Posted : 18 April 2012 12:57:31(UTC)
GlennM

United Kingdom   
Joined: 09/05/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,776
Location: Somewhere Near Manchester, England
Originally Posted by: drstapes Go to Quoted Post
Why is it that when you go to bed everything is working perfectly but next day nothing works at all...........



Gnomes.....I blame Gnomes
Don't look back, your not heading that way.
Offline Western Pacific  
#19 Posted : 18 April 2012 13:17:57(UTC)
Western Pacific

Sweden   
Joined: 19/09/2009(UTC)
Posts: 841
Location: Lidingö, Sweden
I agree that access is a top priority.

Another is reliability, in other words, if access is difficult, but not impossible, then plan the layout for reliable operation and do not put turnouts at such spots.

Another aspect of reliability is from what I have read here and in other fora, the reliability of turnout motors. On my old layout built using M-track I had turnouts that were installed and then never touched (other than replacing burnt out bulbs) for decades, because the M-track turnout motors were very reliable. So I will really do my home work when it comes to turnout motors, since I will have parts with K-track and other parts with C-track and once installed and thorughly tested, I would like to be able to rely on a turnout and its motor for the rest of the life of the layout, which I would set at 15 to 20 years.
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Offline Ian555  
#20 Posted : 18 April 2012 13:33:42(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Per,

Some very valid points there , all interesting stuff for those of us planning a new layout soon. ThumpUp

Ian.
Offline Joseph Meiring  
#21 Posted : 18 April 2012 13:50:35(UTC)
Joseph Meiring

South Africa   
Joined: 27/12/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,157
Location: Western Cape Cape Town
Originally Posted by: DigitalNZ Go to Quoted Post
I'd have to agree with the access! Recently my pet problem is C track turnout motors which really need to be accessed from underneath. Work perfectly one day, not the next and always when you want to show someone something!

So true!...cannot believe the absolute unreliability of these motors (older 74490, or newer supposed to be better 74491?!?)...Marklin really should be quite ashamed of their overall quality in their products..ThumbDown
Joe
Offline BrandonVA  
#22 Posted : 23 April 2012 18:33:10(UTC)
BrandonVA

United States   
Joined: 09/12/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,533
Location: VA
I agree, the older style turnout motors were much more reliable. Maybe not as small and worse clearance but beefy stuff.

A few of my own layout tips:

-Make sure turnouts are setup in a way that doesn't lend itself to derailment (e.g. using the spur of the turnout instead of the main line)
-Whatever your method of planning, make sure you accommodate for turnout motor placement. I have messed up twice on this one!
-If possible, design so that driver error has limited or no impact...basically don't let drivers cause a problem.
-Don't forget about your longest coaches, make sure they have corner clearance.
-Make sure your layout design holds the lengths of trains you want to run

-Brandon
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Offline Ian555  
#23 Posted : 23 April 2012 19:31:21(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Brandon,

Plenty good tips there....thanks.

Ian.
Offline hennabm  
#24 Posted : 23 April 2012 20:12:17(UTC)
hennabm

Scotland   
Joined: 22/09/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,938
Location: Edinburgh,
Hi Brandon

All good tips and so true.
I've been using a 27cm coach for all my curves to ensure clearance.ThumpUp

Mike
1957 - 1985 era
What's digital?
Offline Chris6382chris  
#25 Posted : 23 April 2012 21:52:20(UTC)
Chris6382chris

United States   
Joined: 27/11/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,160
Location: Middle of the US
These are all great points. I would say one of the most important things to consider is planning. Planning in every phase, from design to construction, track placement, wiring, control, traffic flow, etc... The more you plan the better your final product.

Chris
Offline perz  
#26 Posted : 23 April 2012 23:02:36(UTC)
perz

Sweden   
Joined: 12/01/2002(UTC)
Posts: 2,577
Location: Sweden
I want to add the advice to build up the intended track plan on the floor (or a big table) first and make a test run. This will reveal weaknesses e.g. regarding grades, clearances and operational possibilities.
Offline Dreadnought  
#27 Posted : 24 April 2012 02:21:04(UTC)
Dreadnought

Canada   
Joined: 24/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 402
Location: Niagara, Ontario
I am in the process of rebuilding my layout. I have a small room. My train table is 9 ft by 7. ( 275 cm by 215). The table is 3/4 inch (1 cm) plywood. I mounted it on large swivel wheels. I have about 2 ft of clearance on one side, about 1 ft on the long (other) side. I can pull the table in any direction to get at the problem areas. I have an access hole inthe centre about 2 ft square. It lifts out and can be lowered tithe ground. It will. Or have track on it.

The track (M track) is being laid on Noch matting, green, gray, and brown.

So far moving the table has been easy. The weight on track, and trains does not effect the mobility of the table.
Offline Dreadnought  
#28 Posted : 24 April 2012 02:22:37(UTC)
Dreadnought

Canada   
Joined: 24/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 402
Location: Niagara, Ontario
P.S. the table is solid enough to support my weight as I work on the new layout.
Offline Dreadnought  
#29 Posted : 24 April 2012 02:24:09(UTC)
Dreadnought

Canada   
Joined: 24/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 402
Location: Niagara, Ontario
P.S. the table is solid enough to support my weight as I work on the new layout.
Offline Maxi  
#30 Posted : 24 April 2012 03:57:35(UTC)
Maxi


Joined: 28/04/2003(UTC)
Posts: 757
Location: Wawa, Ontario
Originally Posted by: Dreadnought Go to Quoted Post
I am in the process of rebuilding my layout. I have a small room. My train table is 9 ft by 7. ( 275 cm by 215). The table is 3/4 inch (1 cm) plywood. I mounted it on large swivel wheels.

So far moving the table has been easy. The weight on track, and trains does not effect the mobility of the table.


Should work fine on a hard surface floor (no carpet).
I just took apart a layout that was 11ft by 5ft and it moved along with no problems on a concrete floor (purchased from a friend who had to sell due to health reasons and it took 40 hours to dismantel).
The legs were mounted in the 4ftx8ft frame and the rest extended beyond in all directions.
The real secret is to ensure there are enough braces for the legs. This layout had 1/2inch plywood in triangles supporting each leg in two directions and it never shifted one bit, well built.

Matthew
Offline kariosls37  
#31 Posted : 24 April 2012 07:57:48(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,067
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Some pointers from my way:
-Make sure you support your elevaed tracks adequately
-Make sure all track connections are smooth, and that there are no kinks or bumps in the track
-have plenty of feeder wires, it reduces the chance that X years down the track parts of the layout lose power for mysterious reasons.
-Not having a layout looking like someone spilled a plate of spaghtetti on the table will greatly aid realism
-In humid climates or near the sea, make sure your layout room is protected from excess moisture, leading to rusty steel.
-make sure you think your trackplan through. It can be quite annoyinng when you've spent much time and money on something that you cannot run some of your trains on.
-Once you start buildng, try to get something running as soon as possible, for motivation and so everything can be tested and fixed while you still can.

Good luck,
Rick
Offline Western Pacific  
#32 Posted : 24 April 2012 08:13:56(UTC)
Western Pacific

Sweden   
Joined: 19/09/2009(UTC)
Posts: 841
Location: Lidingö, Sweden
Originally Posted by: BrandonVA Go to Quoted Post
I agree, the older style turnout motors were much more reliable. Maybe not as small and worse clearance but beefy stuff.

A few of my own layout tips:

-Make sure turnouts are setup in a way that doesn't lend itself to derailment (e.g. using the spur of the turnout instead of the main line)
-Whatever your method of planning, make sure you accommodate for turnout motor placement. I have messed up twice on this one!
-If possible, design so that driver error has limited or no impact...basically don't let drivers cause a problem.
-Don't forget about your longest coaches, make sure they have corner clearance.
-Make sure your layout design holds the lengths of trains you want to run

-Brandon


Very good points. On the penultimate point I would suggest doing practical test over and over again during construction and use the largest locos and coaches or wagons you have (or can borrow).

I had a bad experience building an old layout a long time ago. Everything worked fine until I got my 3048 DB BR01, then I had to bring out my chisel and remove parts of support inside tunnels because the "Witte-Windleitblechen" (smoke deflectors) extended too far compared to the locos I had tested with before.

On my new layout I plan on doing tests with German steam locos, with my Big Boy and with my Roco Swedish 1980-ies series*) of passenger coaches, being 1:87 in length and I believe also 1:87 in width and this means that they are wider than for instance a DB 1:87 passenger coach and thus more likely to either hit things too close to the rails with the outside corner or the middle of the coach on the inside. As an alternative to the SJ coaches I will check if my Walters AMTRAK coaches might**) present "a worst case", but I know that these will not run on R1 unless modified and I have not made up my mind if I will have lines with restrictions to run certain trains or not and if I will modify the AMTRAK coaches.

________

*)

Photo on Helmut Kern's Internet page


**)

Amtrak Catalog photo
Offline Ian555  
#33 Posted : 24 April 2012 09:06:07(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Chris,

Very good point....planning. ThumpUp

I'd better start then. Smile

Ian.

Offline intruder  
#34 Posted : 25 April 2012 22:58:47(UTC)
intruder

Norway   
Joined: 16/08/2006(UTC)
Posts: 5,382
Location: Akershus, Norway
Thanks for a lot of useful information.

I also see that access should have the first priority.
Best regards Svein, Norway
grumpy old sod
Offline Ian555  
#35 Posted : 26 April 2012 08:15:55(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Svein,

Access is on the top of my list.

Ian.

Offline NZMarklinist  
#36 Posted : 27 April 2012 17:59:56(UTC)
NZMarklinist

New Zealand   
Joined: 15/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,757
Location: Auckland NZ
Originally Posted by: DigitalNZ Go to Quoted Post
I'd have to agree with the access! Recently my pet problem is C track turnout motors which really need to be accessed from underneath. Work perfectly one day, not the next and always when you want to show someone something!


Hi Daniel & All,
When developing our Auckland Marklin Club Module Sig standard we ( Andrew Hardisty actually) came up with the idea that the track bed should be cut out under the C track turnout motors, as even back then (2006) there was talk of problems with them. ( Not sure if thats in the spec tho Unsure )
Since then I've even seen the suggestion in some Marklin publication (not sure which tho) that the track bed should be cut out to allow access to replace or repair the point motors. A must if your building up balast along the C tracks Wink ThumpUp

I should add that there are very good tips here from evryone so far BigGrin ThumpUp
Glen
Auckland NZ

" Every Marklin layout needs a V200, a Railbus and a Banana car", not to mention a few Black and red Steamers, oh and the odd Elok !

CS1 Reloaded, Touch Cab, C Track Modules, K track layout all under construction. Currently Insider
Offline NZMarklinist  
#37 Posted : 27 April 2012 18:54:30(UTC)
NZMarklinist

New Zealand   
Joined: 15/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,757
Location: Auckland NZ
Originally Posted by: Ian555 Go to Quoted Post
Hi Svein,

Access is on the top of my list.

Ian.




I can see I 'll have to start my layout thread, but my layout (well I've at least bought the timber and tracks) which is "L" shape 2.7m wide by 2.0m to the toe of the "L" where a Turntable and planned for,12 Bay Round house will sit. The width of the main part is now 1.45m. Any how it will be on castors so it can be pulled away from the back wall, set at around 900mm off the floor & I can stand there to access the back of the layout.
Also I'm intending to get the main part, set at around 900mm off the floor, all wired and "perfected" if thats possible Unsure Scared Blushing, before fitting the Schatten Bahn Hoff underneath. That is contrary to best practice, but the reason, I hope, will be apparent when you see in the thread, what I'm up too ! ( just don't hassle me to get it posted tho Wink )
One great help has been a track planning programm and thanks to list member, Nigel Packer, I'm using Win Rail". I haven't, as yet, set the heights so I won't post the plan at the moment otherwise Rick will give me bollocks about "throwing down spagetti" LOL

I'm using 42mm dressed clear pine (40mm finished) for the frame & stringers, and 6.5mm ply for the deck and track beds and it will be built in three "modular" parts down in the garage and moved to the "Train Room" (read half of the office or third bedroom) in the three seperate bits, four when you count the Schatten Bahnhoff, maybe five, if I build the spiral as a seperate piece, which will rise in the heel of the "L" over which will be a "Mountain" (with vertical ply formers, covered in mesh and plaster tape) with a branch line running thru and "Up It" There is a bit more too it but I'll save that for the layout thread Sneaky
The pieces will be bolted together and electrically connected using Molex plugs Wink and I've planned for eight legs with castors. The "SB" will be suspended inside the legs of the 2.7 x 1.45m part. The specs may seem a bit light weight but I reckon they're in keeping with the overall size of the structure and will allow reasonable movement within the house, and out of if I happened to move out anytime soon. However I'm intending it to be short term as I hope to knock out the adjoing wall to the master Ensuite Bathroom and extend the Train Room to a total of 4.6m x 2.7m. That will involve some major alterations to the house, shifting a wall fwd in the Master Bedroom to allow an ensuite at the back, and a whole new Layout of course Wink.
Mind you as my builder mate says, why do I need an ensuite when there's another full Bathroom on the same floor Wink ( You can tell I don't have an FD can't you Sneaky )
Glen
Auckland NZ

" Every Marklin layout needs a V200, a Railbus and a Banana car", not to mention a few Black and red Steamers, oh and the odd Elok !

CS1 Reloaded, Touch Cab, C Track Modules, K track layout all under construction. Currently Insider
Offline Ian555  
#38 Posted : 27 April 2012 19:01:01(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Glen,

Sounds like a great project, remember some photo's when you get started.

One thing though, I'd keep the en-suite. Smile

Ian.

Offline NZMarklinist  
#39 Posted : 27 April 2012 19:20:58(UTC)
NZMarklinist

New Zealand   
Joined: 15/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,757
Location: Auckland NZ
Originally Posted by: Ian555 Go to Quoted Post
Hi Glen,

Sounds like a great project, remember some photo's when you get started.

One thing though, I'd keep the en-suite. Smile

Ian.




Hi Ian,
Yes I'm taking pics of all the stages, it's "mocked up" on the lounge floor at the moment. Smile

And of course if I do extend the "Train Room" the alterations will include a new "Ensuite" for the sake of resale value at least of course, and I reckon the 4.6 x 2.7, 3rd bedroom, will make a great "kids room" or nusery after it's been my "big kid room/train room" Wink Woot BigGrin but that'll be several years away Sad
Glen
Auckland NZ

" Every Marklin layout needs a V200, a Railbus and a Banana car", not to mention a few Black and red Steamers, oh and the odd Elok !

CS1 Reloaded, Touch Cab, C Track Modules, K track layout all under construction. Currently Insider
Offline Ian555  
#40 Posted : 27 April 2012 19:29:56(UTC)
Ian555

Scotland   
Joined: 04/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 20,024
Location: Scotland
Hi Glen,

Looking forward to the photo's. ThumpUp

Ian.

Offline NZMarklinist  
#41 Posted : 27 April 2012 19:49:38(UTC)
NZMarklinist

New Zealand   
Joined: 15/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,757
Location: Auckland NZ
Originally Posted by: petestra Go to Quoted Post
Hi, I think that Ian has hit the nail on the head with a very important point. Access, access, access! You will
sooner or later have to get to all points of your little world. Years ago I used to use a stool to get up on the
layout and and put my knees in a free area and climb about but at 59 now those days are over. Although
I have pretty much kept a boyish figure you have to make life easier on yourself for cleaning, wrecks (I hardly
ever have any except for hard to reach places LOL ), and redoing scenic material. Plan ahead with the
trackplan. I used the Marklin track software, 1st edition 1.0 version. German knowledge really helps if
you learn model railway vocabulary. I made about 5 or 6 layouts before I decided on the one that offered
for me the most play value. Happy planning.
PeterSmile


Hi Peter,
"I made about 5 or 6 layouts before I decided on the one that offered
for me the most play value. Happy planning."

Play value, very good point and what I've tried to achieve with my small layout.

The "Win Rail" I'm using is in English at no exceptional extra cost and very user friendly and has most of the "Win Track" design features AFAIK
It has a very large & detailed Instruction book too in English, in PDF on my computer, down loaded off the disc ThumpUp I've yet to fully read it tho, I sort of took the view each part is on a need to know basis as I progress along, altho I've got past that stage and need to do some revision Blushing Wink
Also when I open it up, it regularly "calls home" for updates ThumpUp
My layout has gone thru at least five or six periferal alterations, but the basic core has remained the same, which will be revealed in my "layout thread" Wink Smile
Bigger layouts commonly have lift out hatches and walking points ! eg; MiWuLa in Hamburg, they also have gantry devises similar to the "overhead creeper" devise Kevin reffered too. MiWuLa totally access their airport by walking on it, but very carefully Scared Smile

1.m to maybe 1.2m is about as wide as you can deal with with front access only Huh
Glen
Auckland NZ

" Every Marklin layout needs a V200, a Railbus and a Banana car", not to mention a few Black and red Steamers, oh and the odd Elok !

CS1 Reloaded, Touch Cab, C Track Modules, K track layout all under construction. Currently Insider
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