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Offline applor  
#1 Posted : 25 March 2010 06:36:29(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,494
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Hello everyone.

I'm looking to get started in weathering and I am shopping for an airbrush.
I've read a single action will give me good results and I should go a top feed.

The Testors Aztec series seem to be held in high regard.
What do the members on here use?
I find Cem's work to be very good, what do you use?

I'm looking at maybe an Aztec A220 or should I spent extra for the A340 or something else again?
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
Offline tiono  
#2 Posted : 25 March 2010 07:35:39(UTC)
tiono

United States   
Joined: 09/02/2010(UTC)
Posts: 234
Offline sebastian  
#3 Posted : 25 March 2010 14:05:05(UTC)
sebastian

Canada   
Joined: 01/02/2007(UTC)
Posts: 729
Location: Ontario
If you're just starting on airbrushing, you can start with a single action if you want to. A double action is more versatile though and I would recommend on starting with it. Learning the double action is not that hard. Takes a little more practice, but you'll get the hang of it.
In terms of brand, I can tell you what I have and what I have started with. I've started with Badger, then moved to Iwata. While I still have the Badger ones, I am using them only for priming and covering large areas. When it comes to fine lines, delicate work and overall superb control, I prefer Iwata. ThumpUp
Go to the store and try out some models from different brands. See which one feels better in your hand. Stay away from cheap stuff as it will break down soon. I hope this helps. Good luck.
DRG, DB and SBB
Era II, III and IV
Sincerely,
Sebastian
Offline applor  
#4 Posted : 26 March 2010 01:42:34(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,494
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Which Iwata are you using? What model is appropriate for doing MRR weathering?
Is the HP-B plus a good choice?
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
Offline sebastian  
#5 Posted : 26 March 2010 13:22:37(UTC)
sebastian

Canada   
Joined: 01/02/2007(UTC)
Posts: 729
Location: Ontario
I am using a Custom Micron C. HP line is excellent. And the HP-B Plus is good as it doesn't hold a lot of paint and for 1:87 you don't need a lot of it. I am doing also 1:35 models that's why I have one with a bigger cup. Regardless of the one you choose, you will be satisfied. Take good care of it. Clean it regularly, treat it well and you'll enjoy years with it. If you have further questions, I'll help you.
DRG, DB and SBB
Era II, III and IV
Sincerely,
Sebastian
Offline Turbo T Terry  
#6 Posted : 31 March 2010 05:21:59(UTC)
Turbo T Terry


Joined: 08/04/2007(UTC)
Posts: 25
Location: Jackson, WI
I'll second Sebastian's advice. I use an Iwata HP-C for nearly everything and have done so for 10 years. It's a flexible and practical brush with a good spray pattern. If you're going to do very, very fine work, you can't go wrong with a Micron or a Tamiya HG super fine. Other brands offer similar brushes and many of them are very good also. I think the most important thing for weathering is to use a double-action brush because it gives you much better control.
Have fun!
T.
Offline Webmaster  
#7 Posted : 31 March 2010 22:03:46(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 11,121
I have an Aztek a470 double action one, very easy to use once you get the hang of it. Since my kit included an instructional video, the basics were easy to learn and the different nozzles give different precision & effects. Even my son managed to master it about 10 years ago...

Only use acrylic colors...

UserPostedImage
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
Offline applor  
#8 Posted : 01 April 2010 09:28:04(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,494
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Thanks for your responses.

I am leaning towards an Aztek A430. Dual action with DVD.

According to the item listing it comes with:
Features:

Patented Aztek Nozzle System for quick effects changes and minimal clean-up

A430 Airbrush

6' (1.8 mm) Air Hose

General Purpose Nozzle /.40 mm

3 cc Gravity Feed Color Cup

10 cc Gravity Feed Color Cup

28 mm Siphon cap & bottle

Instruction manual & DVD

Compressor adapter

Plastic storage case.



Just wondering, are there any other nozzles or what not I will need and should order at the same time?

What about for air - do you guys use compressed air in a can or a compressor and which would you recommend? How long will a can last?

Thanks!
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
Offline Darren W  
#9 Posted : 01 April 2010 20:12:21(UTC)
Darren W

Canada   
Joined: 01/01/2007(UTC)
Posts: 638
Location: Alberta
I have a badger 200 that I have not used much. I hope to get into it more soon. The cans don't last long and add up real quick. If you want to do a lot of airbrushing invest in a compressor and an inline water trap. You could also get a portable air tank that you can fill up with a compressor (even at a gas station). Think about getting a mask as airbrush fumes should not be inhaled.

Cheers...
Darren
Offline sebastian  
#10 Posted : 01 April 2010 20:28:26(UTC)
sebastian

Canada   
Joined: 01/02/2007(UTC)
Posts: 729
Location: Ontario
applor wrote:
What about for air - do you guys use compressed air in a can or a compressor and which would you recommend? How long will a can last?

Thanks!


It all depends on the job you're doing. A can should last for about one 1:35 model, maybe two. Having in mind that you're just starting, go for a can and then get a compressor. Now, the compressor is a different animal. A good one is not cheap. A bad one will make the whole airbrushing experience a nightmare.
If you choose to work with acrilycs, a moisture trap is not an absolute must, though it'll save on drying time. If you choose enamels, then that is a must have.
As well, a pressure gauge is also a must, regardless of the type of paint you're working with. This helps you regulate the pressure so it can match whatever you're trying to do. Working closer to the model for instance and in this case you'll have to as it is the HO scale, will require a smaller pressure setting. For general work and large areas to cover, you'll be further away from the model and a higher pressure is required.
However, by reading the specs I am not sure what type of air hose you're getting. I strongly suggest getting a braided hose instead of the one the manufacturer is giving in the kit.
This whole thing is quite costly when you add everything up. But it will last you forever.
I hope this helps you.
DRG, DB and SBB
Era II, III and IV
Sincerely,
Sebastian
Offline Marius in Africa  
#11 Posted : 01 April 2010 21:16:40(UTC)
Marius in Africa

South Africa   
Joined: 05/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 415
Location: Boksburg, Gauteng
I have to agree with the comments above, go for double action with a top feed (gravity feed)and expect to pay a bit more for quality. My airbrush is from Paasche in the USA, bought the Talon model in a set (TG-SET) for about $150. Most of the suppliers will ship to any country. www.paascheairbrush.com

There are a number of good quality brands out there, and as allready stated elsewhere, it is very much a personal choice thing. Just don't try to go for a cheap and nasty set. You can also buy the training CD as a separate item form a few suppliers.

Good luck with the choices, decisions, they never stop but they are oh so nice to make when it is for your hobby.BigGrin

Regards
Marius in Africa

HO, ECoS 2, Märklin C-track, any country, any design, any era & any brand which i like.
Offline Marius in Africa  
#12 Posted : 01 April 2010 21:18:29(UTC)
Marius in Africa

South Africa   
Joined: 05/06/2009(UTC)
Posts: 415
Location: Boksburg, Gauteng
Blushing
Marius in Africa

HO, ECoS 2, Märklin C-track, any country, any design, any era & any brand which i like.
Offline applor  
#13 Posted : 02 June 2010 03:35:25(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,494
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Does anyone know where I can buy an air compressor in Australia? The only ones in ebay are from the states and shipping costs are a real killer.

I'm guessing some hobby shops may stock them, but whats a good brand and what should i avoid?

Thanks
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
Offline nevw  
#14 Posted : 02 June 2010 05:30:44(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,058
Location: Murrumba Downs QLD
Eric,
Hobbyrama at Stafford would have them also Bunnings and any large Tool Place eg Total Tools Glenfords.
PM On its way.
N
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have 2 new shiny tin Hips that is badly in Need of Repair matching tin shoulders
and a hose pipe on the aorta
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#15 Posted : 02 June 2010 10:08:04(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,995
Location: New Zealand
Eric, you can also try Supercheap Autos. Supercheap in NZ sell compressors, no reason why Oz should not have them.

http://www.supercheapaut...-locator/Queensland.aspx


And I'm sure there are Mitre10/Mega Mitre10's in Oz, they also sell compressors.

http://www.mitre10.com.a...ocator-Search/search/QLD
Offline applor  
#16 Posted : 03 June 2010 09:23:11(UTC)
applor

Australia   
Joined: 21/05/2004(UTC)
Posts: 1,494
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Would I not need an air compressor with compatible fittings to suit whatever airbrush I purchase? Or are they a standard type or able to get whatever adaptors I'd need?
modelling 1954 Germany (era IIIa)
Offline nevw  
#17 Posted : 03 June 2010 11:33:22(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,058
Location: Murrumba Downs QLD
applor wrote:
Would I not need an air compressor with compatible fittings to suit whatever airbrush I purchase? Or are they a standard type or able to get whatever adaptors I'd need?

Usually standard fittings , but adaptors are available if needed to match the size of thread.

NN
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have 2 new shiny tin Hips that is badly in Need of Repair matching tin shoulders
and a hose pipe on the aorta
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline sebastian  
#18 Posted : 03 June 2010 14:23:00(UTC)
sebastian

Canada   
Joined: 01/02/2007(UTC)
Posts: 729
Location: Ontario
If you plan on using a can, check in the airbrush's box for a can adaptor. You might need to purchase one - not expensive at all. If you're looking to use a compressor, check for compatibility between your airbrush and the compressor you intend to buy. For instance, my Iwata compressor does not fit the Badger airbrush. Usually, a good compressor comes with adaptors in the box for the most types of airbrush, but you better make sure before you leave the store. Adaptors are not expensive. One more thing. No matter what type of compressor you get, invest in a better hose. The one that comes with the compressor is usually (99% of the time)a crappy, plastic one. Get a braided hose. You'll be happy with it.
DRG, DB and SBB
Era II, III and IV
Sincerely,
Sebastian
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