Welcome to the forum   
Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Share
Options
View
Go to last post in this topic Go to first unread post in this topic
Offline Larry  
#1 Posted : 12 June 2009 08:11:15(UTC)
Larry

United States   
Joined: 14/11/2003(UTC)
Posts: 1,443
Location: Northeast Ohio
While I realize this has been covered in different places on this forum, I'd like to ask what are the best CURRENT practices in oiling Marklin HO? Some of my locos have not been run for 3 years and I'm paranoid that I'll burn out their motors without proper oil. Yet, I do not want to do the wrong thing, use the wrong oil and accelerate their deaths.

What is the best advice known at this point on:

1) Under what conditions to oil the gears and motor (new, after 40 hours, 1-2 to 3 years after no use, etc.)

2) What to use to oil gears? (LaBelle oil for plastics, etc.?)

3) What to use to oil/grease the motor

4) How to oil/grease the motor

Thanks much. I want to have my Marklin HO locos still working when I am retired and that is years away! I know Marklin offers photos on what to do with the manual to each loco, but these don't explain all of what I need to know. I can also take my locos to the dealer nearby and get this done but I really need to know how to do this myself in hopefully an expert fashion.
Offline Sander van Wijk  
#2 Posted : 12 June 2009 11:59:37(UTC)
Sander van Wijk

Netherlands   
Joined: 20/04/2003(UTC)
Posts: 2,248
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands; Göteborg, Sverige,
Hi Larry,

Generally, I would only put a very tiny bit of oil (in my case Faller, which comes in a very convenient container with a needle) on the motor axle, thus, the axle between the coals. Obviously, on both sides of this axle. Aside from that, I occasionally use some grease (Trix) on the gears. Although that is not a standard procedure with me, more of an exception if I feel the gears are noisy. In any way; less is more.
Sander
---
Era I(b): K.Bay.Sts.B. and K.W.St.E.
Offline RayF  
#3 Posted : 12 June 2009 14:29:08(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,768
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
I agree with Sander.

Occasionally, I also need to oil (very lightly) the axles. This will eliminate the squeeking you sometimes hear as the train runs. Watch out for carrying axles, like on the pony trucks or leading or trailing bogies, which sometimes jam and stop rotating. I've had that happen to me occasionally. If you don't notice the loco might run like this for a while, and you might get a "flat spot" on a pair of wheels.
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#4 Posted : 12 June 2009 14:37:25(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,912
Location: New Zealand
Larry, I believe you can get Labelle products in the US. Many people in our Marklin Club, and in the US use the Labelle #108 oil to lubricate their locos. As has been stated you only need 1 drop in the places indicated in the loco's manual. Any more will cause the loco to swim in oil.

And instead of Trix grease you can use the Labelle #106 grease.

http://factorydirecttrai...101lightoil-1-1-1-1.aspx
Offline Larry  
#5 Posted : 13 June 2009 02:41:56(UTC)
Larry

United States   
Joined: 14/11/2003(UTC)
Posts: 1,443
Location: Northeast Ohio
Thanks to all for the great information. Now I should be on the right track with all the expert advice!
Offline Larry  
#6 Posted : 13 June 2009 18:44:55(UTC)
Larry

United States   
Joined: 14/11/2003(UTC)
Posts: 1,443
Location: Northeast Ohio
One more question. Is appropriate to use the same oil, such as LaBelle oil, for the gears as well as for the motor???

With O gauge models it is necessary to use a grease for the motors and something like LaBelle oil for the axels and gears.

Any clarification would be most halpful. Thanks!
Offline davemr  
#7 Posted : 13 June 2009 22:11:28(UTC)
davemr


Joined: 09/02/2009(UTC)
Posts: 983
Location: ,
Just read the instructions and oil where marked using Marklin oil.
If Marklin produce oil for their locos then I expect it is what to use. Not a great bottle but its the contents that count.
davemr
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#8 Posted : 14 June 2009 01:04:34(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 17,912
Location: New Zealand
Larry, it should be fine to use LaBelle oil on both gears and motors. Usually the manual that comes with the loco indicates where you should use grease. The LaBelle grease should be fine, it is what I'm using!
Offline PeterCambridge  
#9 Posted : 05 October 2014 17:33:21(UTC)
PeterCambridge

United Kingdom   
Joined: 02/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 7
Location: Cambridge
I must be particularly stupid but I cannot work out precisely where to oil Marklin electric locos (e.g. 37312). The instruction booklet has two pages of illustrations for this. The first page is clear even to me - you oil the axles and cog wheels. But I cannot work out what the illustrations on the second page show. I have held the loco in every possible position and nothing seems to relate to these illustrations. Can someone help, please?
Offline sjlauritsen  
#10 Posted : 05 October 2014 18:32:55(UTC)
sjlauritsen

Denmark   
Joined: 18/08/2007(UTC)
Posts: 1,081
Location: Denmark
Originally Posted by: PeterCambridge Go to Quoted Post
I must be particularly stupid but I cannot work out precisely where to oil Marklin electric locos (e.g. 37312). The instruction booklet has two pages of illustrations for this. The first page is clear even to me - you oil the axles and cog wheels. But I cannot work out what the illustrations on the second page show. I have held the loco in every possible position and nothing seems to relate to these illustrations. Can someone help, please?


Page 18 holds the instructions for oiling the locomotive. As far as I can tell, this is all you need to do. Page 19 is about changing the motor brushes.
Søren from Denmark
Blog: https://railway.zone/ | Danish Model Railway Forum: https://baneforum.dk/
Offline PeterCambridge  
#11 Posted : 05 October 2014 18:41:15(UTC)
PeterCambridge

United Kingdom   
Joined: 02/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 7
Location: Cambridge
The booklet I have has oiling diagrams on pages 18 and 19, and it's the one on p. 19 I don't understand. Changing the brushes is on pp. 22 and 23.

Peter
Offline H0  
#12 Posted : 05 October 2014 18:50:13(UTC)
H0


Joined: 16/02/2004(UTC)
Posts: 14,202
Location: DE-NW
Copy this URL to the address field of your browser (so we talk about the same manual):
Code:
medienpdb.maerklin.de/product_files/1/pdf/37312_betrieb.pdf
Regards
Tom
---
"In all of the gauges, we particularly emphasize a high level of quality, the best possible fidelity to the prototype, and absolute precision. You will see that in all of our products." (from Märklin New Items Brochure 2015, page 1) ROFLBTCUTS
UserPostedImage
Offline PeterCambridge  
#13 Posted : 05 October 2014 19:11:27(UTC)
PeterCambridge

United Kingdom   
Joined: 02/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 7
Location: Cambridge
Tom

Using the link you sent, it's the top two illustrations on page 18.

Regards

Peter
Offline RayF  
#14 Posted : 05 October 2014 19:14:36(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,768
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Hi Peter,

Do you have the right manual? The one on the link supplied by Tom is the same as mine for the 37312.

With the classic Marklin mechanisms you only need a drop of oil on each wheel axle and one small drop at each of the motor bearings. That's one on the round bit in between the two brushes on the side with the brushes, and one on the opposite side where the motor axles pokes through the casting on the side of the gears.

Hope this helps.
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
Offline PeterCambridge  
#15 Posted : 05 October 2014 19:25:41(UTC)
PeterCambridge

United Kingdom   
Joined: 02/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 7
Location: Cambridge
Ray

NOW I've got it. I was nervous about applying oil to anything inside the housing, but now I can see where it is to go. Thanks for your help.

Peter
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by PeterCambridge
Offline Dangermouse  
#16 Posted : 20 October 2014 16:09:08(UTC)
Dangermouse

United Kingdom   
Joined: 01/07/2014(UTC)
Posts: 115
Location: Wales
Also worth bearing in mind that some models have oil pads for the motor bearings.

DCM locos don't, so a drop on each end of the armature shaft. SFCM and LFCM do, the pad is above the shaft and intended to be soaked in oil which will then be passed to the shaft as needed (just like some 1:1 scale trains).

Also, if you buy a used loco then you may need to clean a mix of old oil and carbon powder from the brushes out of the armature and commutator area. I use an ultrasonic cleaner followed by wiping the brush holders out and using a pin to scrape any carbon residue from the gaps between the pole pieces on the commutator. Then reassemble, add a drop of oil to each axle bearing, check the motor spins freely if you turn the gears by hand, then refit the brushes and test.
You can never have too many Silberlinge
thanks 2 users liked this useful post by Dangermouse
Users browsing this topic
OceanSpiders 2.0
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

| Powered by YAF.NET | YAF.NET © 2003-2021, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.654 seconds.