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Offline marklinz007  
#1 Posted : 26 September 2022 19:56:12(UTC)
marklinz007

United States   
Joined: 26/09/2022(UTC)
Posts: 2
Location: Florida, Cape Coral
I have been around Marklin Z for awhile, mostly collecting and have not made a layout yet, but I will. Question is I have a lot of locomotives/engines that
need serviced (they don't work). Whom out there can help me? Marklin Z dealers? I heard they are expensive and have a back log of months?
Thank you for all the ideas and help.
Also, I have watched many YouTube videos on how to service Marklin Z locos/engines and it seems complicated (I read the peoples comments too that have tried)...
Offline Donb  
#2 Posted : 26 September 2022 20:21:08(UTC)
Donb

Canada   
Joined: 03/04/2013(UTC)
Posts: 257
Location: Fraser Valley
Hi and welcome to the forum!
I started with Z scale last Christmas and have been really enjoying it.
I have found that a good cleaning of the track, the wheels and checking the brushes often solves running problems.
After that, just post what you are going to work on, with pictures, and the experts on this forum will help you with tips and guidance.
Enjoy!
Best Regards,
Don
___________________________________________________________________________________
Viessmann Commander, ECoS 50210 , C track and Z scale
thanks 2 users liked this useful post by Donb
Offline Zme  
#3 Posted : 28 September 2022 05:24:11(UTC)
Zme

United States   
Joined: 02/10/2013(UTC)
Posts: 579
Location: West Texas
Hello, hope all is well.

I understand your concern for doing repairs on these small locomotives. It might be something which is unfamiliar. I felt the same concern when I considered this myself. One thing about these small locomotives, it seems, they keep working with a bit of basic maintenance. Sometimes for 50 years, and this is amazing! If you have the interest and some ability, along with a small screwdriver, you can do many repairs yourself. I suggest starting your DIY with the simpler ones, a V60, or BR 89 for example. It is also easier to work on diesel and electric locomotives. Steamer take more care and have more parts. Crocs are perhaps some of the more complex.

No matter what needs repair, there is a potential to lose or damage something. Just take your time, the parts are small and eye magnification might be a good addition to your toolbag. Just be careful. There are many tips and tricks which may be found on this forum. You might surprise yourself on what can be accomplished. Fortunately, Marklin has many parts diagrams available on their website. Here is a link:

https://www.maerklin.de/...-parts/spare-parts-lists

The Marklin model number is found on the carton. (8816 or 8856) Add this number to the input box of the webpage. Sometimes the older models do not have parts diagrams. Older models also might not have parts available from Marklin. Secondary sources might have to be considered.

If after all which I have said, you still would rather have a professional do your service, the only one I know about is z hobo. Search on google. I have never used him for repairs, but have purchased parts from the website. You can contact Frank and see if he can help you. There might be some backlogs and if parts are not in stock, it can sometimes take a month to get the parts from overseas. I believe the results are worth the wait.

Hope you find this helpful. Take good care.

Dwight
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Zme
Offline marklinz007  
#4 Posted : 28 September 2022 05:51:54(UTC)
marklinz007

United States   
Joined: 26/09/2022(UTC)
Posts: 2
Location: Florida, Cape Coral
Originally Posted by: Zme Go to Quoted Post
Hello, hope all is well.

I understand your concern for doing repairs on these small locomotives. It might be something which is unfamiliar. I felt the same concern when I considered this myself. One thing about these small locomotives, it seems, they keep working with a bit of basic maintenance. Sometimes for 50 years, and this is amazing! If you have the interest and some ability, along with a small screwdriver, you can do many repairs yourself. I suggest starting your DIY with the simpler ones, a V60, or BR 89 for example. It is also easier to work on diesel and electric locomotives. Steamer take more care and have more parts. Crocs are perhaps some of the more complex.

No matter what needs repair, there is a potential to lose or damage something. Just take your time, the parts are small and eye magnification might be a good addition to your toolbag. Just be careful. There are many tips and tricks which may be found on this forum. You might surprise yourself on what can be accomplished. Fortunately, Marklin has many parts diagrams available on their website. Here is a link:

https://www.maerklin.de/...-parts/spare-parts-lists

The Marklin model number is found on the carton. (8816 or 8856) Add this number to the input box of the webpage. Sometimes the older models do not have parts diagrams. Older models also might not have parts available from Marklin. Secondary sources might have to be considered.

If after all which I have said, you still would rather have a professional do your service, the only one I know about is z hobo. Search on google. I have never used him for repairs, but have purchased parts from the website. You can contact Frank and see if he can help you. There might be some backlogs and if parts are not in stock, it can sometimes take a month to get the parts from overseas. I believe the results are worth the wait.

Hope you find this helpful. Take good care.

Dwight
Hello and thank you kindly for getting back to me, yes I think it is challenging to disassemble and re-assemble a steam loco, I think I will try with a diesel engine at first. Thanks again for all the great information. best regards, Todd

Offline Zme  
#5 Posted : 28 September 2022 07:09:41(UTC)
Zme

United States   
Joined: 02/10/2013(UTC)
Posts: 579
Location: West Texas
Hello again. Great.

On diesel locomotives I have a few pointers:

Print out Marklin parts diagram for reference if there is one.

Be careful with the circuit board on the top of the frame. They seem to snap in place and can be a challenge to get off. Old boards might be hard to replace. On new ones, the circuit boards have small contact wisker (like what cats have)which actually make contact with the motor. Replace the board in the correct orientation. Only one screw will actually pass thru the board to attach to the frame. Keep track of where this screw is.

If yours is an old one, the brushes attach in the circuit board. Keep track of how the motor is installed. Mark it on the top so you can reinstall it the same, otherwise it will run in a different direction. Newer models have the brushes attached to the motor and the motor can only be nested in the frame in one way.

Mark the trucks on bottom with marker so they can be installed in the exact location where they were removed. When breaking down the truck, watch for the coupler spring to drop out and get lost. Some use super glue to hold the spring to the plastic coupler. If you do this, do it right away so it will completely dry before you start your reassembly. Keep the copper wheel scraper behind the wheels, it is hard to get right, but important. This is also a good time to check for damage.

I place the parts in little plastic storage boxes, to keep things together until I start reassembly.

Some use ultrasonic cleaners to make certain all the oil comes off. If you don’t have one, small brushes and isopropyl alcohol (not rubbing alcohol)will work. I use 98% alcohol which is used for electrical parts. Cleaner, is better. Of course. I use those small dental brushes to clean stubborn spots, but small toothbrushes work too. Make a dip in fresh alcohol your last step to be certain everything is clean but don’t soak parts in this for an extended period because some parts might lose their sheen. Re-lube your parts, I use Labelles oil. 108.

Take a deep breath, have courage, find a good place to work with plenty of light, you can do it. Your first one will take longer than you expect, that’s okay. I apologize right now, it there is something I failed to mention. I hope I helped.

Best wishes.

Dwight
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Zme
Offline Toosmall  
#6 Posted : 28 September 2022 10:00:07(UTC)
Toosmall

Australia   
Joined: 26/07/2021(UTC)
Posts: 327
Location: Sydney
Start with a 4 axle diesel. Do one end then the other so you don't accidentally put them back on the wrong end.

Watch out for the spring, it will fly off and unless you are in a bare room will be near impossible to find. Even with a torch level with the ground they are near impossible to see.

Work on a large tray with really good lighting & a dark surface of the tray or table. Dark cardboard will do and make an edge.

I have found really the only thing that has been an issue is the oil Marklin uses which goes solid and I have flogged some of my locos to death.

I put all the parts in a small container of lighter fuel (in Australia, Diggers 1L Shellite about $12) then all the muck drops off, dry on paper towel.

Then oil with Faller 170489 25ml bottle. Don't put too much on. The Faller oil is much better.

You really need to be in the mood. So if you have had enough just stop and have a go another day.

Don't start with anything with a complex axle arrangement. 4 axle train, 2 axle bogies are the best to start on to build up confidence.

A few tweezers, square point, fine point and jewellers screwdrivers.


I have five 60cm LED lights for soft spread light.

DSC_0428_071912.jpg

DSC_0927_070935.jpg

Edit: Multiple types of tweezers to hold things different ways. Bend some of them to suit the task.

If you use glass, stack a couple of pairs. If you don't wear glasses but need a bit more magnification just buy some of those cheap ones.

Edited by user 29 September 2022 03:39:06(UTC)  | Reason: 4 axle train, 2 axle bogies, is what I meant.

thanks 3 users liked this useful post by Toosmall
Offline veloboldie  
#7 Posted : 06 October 2022 22:51:29(UTC)
veloboldie

United States   
Joined: 31/05/2018(UTC)
Posts: 47
Location: Arvada
Originally Posted by: marklinz007 Go to Quoted Post
I have been around Marklin Z for awhile, mostly collecting and have not made a layout yet, but I will. Question is I have a lot of locomotives/engines that
need serviced (they don't work). Whom out there can help me? Marklin Z dealers? I heard they are expensive and have a back log of months?
Thank you for all the ideas and help.
Also, I have watched many YouTube videos on how to service Marklin Z locos/engines and it seems complicated (I read the peoples comments too that have tried)...


I sent several of my diesel locos that I bought on eBay, to ajckids.com

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