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Offline Irish Rail  
#1 Posted : 02 April 2014 11:28:31(UTC)
Irish Rail

Ireland   
Joined: 04/03/2014(UTC)
Posts: 123
Location: West Cork
Another silly question (maybe)

My Marklin stuff hasn't been used for 25 years and, although it seems to be functioning, presumably some lubrication of locos, turnouts and other moving parts would be a good idea. Marklin would like to sell me some very expensive oil in a 10ml bottle (€63 per litre).

Is it necessary or advisable to use Marklin oil?
Or will any light machine oil do the trick?
Or is there a specific type/grade/specification of oil that you would recommend?

Many thanks in advance
Des

PS I did search to see if this topic had been discussed before, but searching for "oil" yielded thousands of results.
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#2 Posted : 02 April 2014 12:39:13(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 18,409
Location: New Zealand
I use Labelle 103, which is for model trains. A friend used ordinary 30/40 engine oil with his locos without issue.

I wouldn't use 'light' oil such as 3 in 1 oil, but any good quality mineral engine oil should be fine.

And yes, this topic has been discussed in the forum many times over!
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Offline RayF  
#3 Posted : 02 April 2014 13:05:07(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,799
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
I use Marklin oil when I can get it, as this is what they recommend. Some members don't like it, but I find it does the job as well as anything else I've tried. Model train shops usually have a selection of oils from different manufacturers. If it says it's good for model trains then you can use it.
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
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Offline Br502362  
#4 Posted : 02 April 2014 13:07:47(UTC)
Br502362


Joined: 05/03/2014(UTC)
Posts: 656
Location: Finland
An old Märklin leflet says that one can also use SAE 30W motor oil to lubricate locomotives.

Regards

Åke
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Offline RayF  
#5 Posted : 02 April 2014 14:42:39(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,799
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Originally Posted by: Br502362 Go to Quoted Post
An old Märklin leflet says that one can also use SAE 30W motor oil to lubricate locomotives.

Regards

Åke


How old are we talking about? Is this OK with plastic gears?
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
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Offline kweekalot  
#6 Posted : 02 April 2014 15:44:25(UTC)
kweekalot

Netherlands   
Joined: 27/06/2012(UTC)
Posts: 3,341
Location: Holland
I use Faller Oil, (# 170489).
It is for all small motors, gears and drive systems and doesn’t harm plastic parts.
The long hollow metal needle makes the servive job very easy.


UserPostedImage
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Offline Irish Rail  
#7 Posted : 02 April 2014 16:52:20(UTC)
Irish Rail

Ireland   
Joined: 04/03/2014(UTC)
Posts: 123
Location: West Cork
Thanks for that, guys. I'll see what I can get in a model shop in Dublin tomorrow. As always, your advice is comprehensive. (and appreciated)
Offline kbvrod  
#8 Posted : 02 April 2014 17:19:52(UTC)
kbvrod

United States   
Joined: 23/08/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,597
Location: Beverly, MA
Hi Des,all,

>My Marklin stuff hasn't been used for 25 years and, although it seems to be functioning, presumably some lubrication of locos, turnouts and other moving parts would be a good idea.<

It's a good idea to open things up,see if needs cleaning and lube and some replacements(brushes,springs,etc.) That will also give an idea on how things work.Notes&photos don't hurt either!Wink

>Is it necessary or advisable to use Marklin oil?
Or will any light machine oil do the trick?
Or is there a specific type/grade/specification of oil that you would recommend?<

You'll see some suggestions below.I'm with Big Daddy on the Lebelle but I am now using WS oil very good stuff.
One other thing,on the new loks I have worked on grease seems be too popular with gearing!Woot




>PS I did search to see if this topic had been discussed before, but searching for "oil" yielded thousands of results.<

Well we have talked about a thousand times!Laugh

D

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Offline foumaro  
#9 Posted : 02 April 2014 18:06:27(UTC)
foumaro

Greece   
Joined: 08/12/2004(UTC)
Posts: 4,375
Location: Attiki Athens Greece
Originally Posted by: kweekalot Go to Quoted Post
I use Faller Oil, (# 170489).
It is for all small motors, gears and drive systems and doesn’t harm plastic parts.
The long hollow metal needle makes the servive job very easy.


UserPostedImage


I am using exactly the same and i had no problem for 20 years i am oiling my locomotives,old and new,analog and digital.
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Offline waorb  
#10 Posted : 02 April 2014 18:14:48(UTC)
waorb

Brazil   
Joined: 31/05/2011(UTC)
Posts: 868
Location: Brazil
Originally Posted by: RayF Go to Quoted Post
I use Marklin oil when I can get it, as this is what they recommend. Some members don't like it, but I find it does the job as well as anything else I've tried.


Hello Ray!

Which are the reasons that Märklin oil isn't good? (in the perspective of those who don't like it)

Just in case, I also use Märklin oil... ThumpUp

Cheers,

Walter
Offline franciscohg  
#11 Posted : 02 April 2014 18:18:04(UTC)
franciscohg

Chile   
Joined: 10/07/2002(UTC)
Posts: 3,176
Location: Patagonia
Well, i use Marklin oil and Trix grease where recommended in the instructions booklet.
I also remember having read in a sixties booklet that winter grade motor oil could be used...
UserPostedImage German trains era I-II and selected III, era depends on the mood, mostly Maerklin but i can be heretic if needed XD, heresy is no longer an issue.. LOL
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H0
Offline kbvrod  
#12 Posted : 02 April 2014 18:26:45(UTC)
kbvrod

United States   
Joined: 23/08/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,597
Location: Beverly, MA
The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its resistance to gradual deformation by shear stress or tensile stress. For liquids, it corresponds to the informal notion of "thickness". For example, honey has a higher viscosity than water.

Viscosity is due to the friction between neighboring particles in a fluid that are moving at different velocities. When the fluid is forced through a tube, the fluid generally moves faster near the axis and very slowly near the walls; therefore, some stress (such as a pressure difference between the two ends of the tube) is needed to overcome the friction between layers and keep the fluid moving. For the same velocity pattern, the stress required is proportional to the fluid's viscosity. A liquid's viscosity depends on the size and shape of its particles and the attractions between the particles.[citation needed]

A fluid that has no resistance to shear stress is known as an ideal fluid or inviscid fluid. Zero viscosity is observed only at very low temperatures, in superfluids. Otherwise all fluids have positive viscosity. If the viscosity is very high, for instance in pitch, the fluid will appear to be a solid in the short term. A liquid whose viscosity is less than that of water is sometimes known as a mobile liquid, while a substance with a viscosity substantially greater than water is called a viscous liquid.
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Offline Br502362  
#13 Posted : 03 April 2014 07:24:30(UTC)
Br502362


Joined: 05/03/2014(UTC)
Posts: 656
Location: Finland
Originally Posted by: RayF Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Br502362 Go to Quoted Post
An old Märklin leflet says that one can also use SAE 30W motor oil to lubricate locomotives.

Regards

Åke


How old are we talking about? Is this OK with plastic gears?


Leaflet is from the early 60's. As far as I know it is safe to use with plastic gears.
Automotive engines have also plastic parts which are in touch with motor oil.

Regards
Åke
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H0
Offline H0  
#14 Posted : 03 April 2014 07:59:28(UTC)
H0


Joined: 16/02/2004(UTC)
Posts: 14,603
Location: DE-NW
Hi!
Originally Posted by: waorb Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: RayF Go to Quoted Post
I use Marklin oil when I can get it, as this is what they recommend. Some members don't like it, but I find it does the job as well as anything else I've tried.
Which are the reasons that Märklin oil isn't good? (in the perspective of those who don't like it)
When I came back to the hobby more than 10 years ago I went to a Märklin dealer and asked for Märklin oil. He replied he would not sell that "motor glue" (Motorkleber was the German word he used) and that I could choose between Faller, Roco, Fleischmann. I took the Fleischmann oil as the bottle resembles the Märklin 7199 oil I was used to.

I used Märklin 7199 in the ’70s and nothing had hardened during 25 years of storage and everything worked fine.

OTOH I bought Märklin sets made in the ’90s new from the dealer - and motor and gear were locked with hardened oil.
Always the same story: new formula, a penny saved is a penny earned - and now the Märklin oil has a bad reputation (but it should be OK nowadays).
Regards
Tom
---
"In all of the gauges, we particularly emphasize a high level of quality, the best possible fidelity to the prototype, and absolute precision. You will see that in all of our products." (from Märklin New Items Brochure 2015, page 1) ROFLBTCUTS
UserPostedImage
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Offline PJMärklin  
#15 Posted : 03 April 2014 14:03:56(UTC)
PJMärklin

Australia   
Joined: 04/12/2013(UTC)
Posts: 2,093
Location: Hobart, Australia
Originally Posted by: Irish Rail Go to Quoted Post
Another silly question (maybe)

My Marklin stuff hasn't been used for 25 years and, although it seems to be functioning, presumably some lubrication of locos, turnouts and other moving parts would be a good idea. Marklin would like to sell me some very expensive oil in a 10ml bottle (€63 per litre).

Is it necessary or advisable to use Marklin oil?
Or will any light machine oil do the trick?
Or is there a specific type/grade/specification of oil that you would recommend?

Many thanks in advance
Des

PS I did search to see if this topic had been discussed before, but searching for "oil" yielded thousands of results.


Hi,

I have used Labelle for 32 years, I expect there may be many others suitable.

Regards,

PJ

PS Could you please stop waving that b..... flag !! Laugh

UserPostedImage

UserPostedImage

UserPostedImage

UserPostedImage

UserPostedImage
Offline MSan525  
#16 Posted : 23 May 2022 22:40:29(UTC)
MSan525

United States   
Joined: 07/02/2022(UTC)
Posts: 5
Location: Florida, Fort Myers
Apologies if this has been addressed but I couldn't find info specific to my question about lubrication for locomotives. I was at my local hobby shop checking out various oils and they all state on the packaging that they contain PTFE or teflon. Is that safe to use on Marklin locomotives from the early 1980s? Thanks in advance for any help or insight!
Offline MSan525  
#17 Posted : 23 May 2022 23:23:34(UTC)
MSan525

United States   
Joined: 07/02/2022(UTC)
Posts: 5
Location: Florida, Fort Myers
My apologies if this has been addressed elsewhere in the forum. I recently got back in to the hobby after about 40 years and have a Marklin set and two locomotives from the early 1980s. They're model numbers 89006 and 3074. I've got things up and running and want to maintain everything as best as possible. I went to my local hobby shop to check out the various lubricating oils and saw that they all contain PTFE or teflon. Is that safe to use on my older Marklin locomotives of early 1980s vintage? I'm curious about this because I seem to recall PTFE in lubricants wasn't common in the '80s.

Offline cookee_nz  
#18 Posted : 24 May 2022 08:06:13(UTC)
cookee_nz

New Zealand   
Joined: 31/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 3,817
Location: Paremata, Wellington
Originally Posted by: MSan525 Go to Quoted Post
Apologies if this has been addressed but I couldn't find info specific to my question about lubrication for locomotives. I was at my local hobby shop checking out various oils and they all state on the packaging that they contain PTFE or teflon. Is that safe to use on Marklin locomotives from the early 1980s? Thanks in advance for any help or insight!


You could ask that question ten times and each time get a different answer.

Important thing to remember is that certainly up to the 60's and possibly a bit beyond, most lubricants were mineral, ie fossil fuels, and grease was often clay-based.

But for at least the past 20-30 years, synthetic lubricants have reigned supreme and have good properties.

Generally, the consensus also seems to be not to mix the two for best results but to be a purist in this regard would mean thoroughly cleaning out any old lubricants but that can also be quite invasive.

I've used modern lubricants on some quite old Loco's and had no issues.

Most model shops will stock good brands, such as the mentioned Labelle, Faller etc but some do have particular properties making them especially suitable for certain tasks such as lubricating plastics etc.

Cheers

Steve


PS - I'm not advising against Märklin's own oil, not for a second. I use it myself. But I think the question was more asking what 'other' oils could be used, if Märklin was not available at the local hobby shop.

Edited by user 24 May 2022 12:58:38(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Cookee
Wellington
NZ image
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Offline David Dewar  
#19 Posted : 24 May 2022 12:01:22(UTC)
David Dewar

Scotland   
Joined: 01/02/2004(UTC)
Posts: 7,078
Location: Scotland
Nothing wrong with using Marklin oil which they make for use with their locos. Comes in a very small bottle but the last one I bought was a few years ago and there is still some left. I expect Roco and Piko etc will also have their brand.
Take care I like Marklin and will defend the worlds greatest model rail manufacturer.
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Online JohnjeanB  
#20 Posted : 24 May 2022 12:43:32(UTC)
JohnjeanB

France   
Joined: 04/02/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,128
Location: Paris, France
Originally Posted by: Irish Rail Go to Quoted Post
Is it necessary or advisable to use Marklin oil?
Or will any light machine oil do the trick?
Or is there a specific type/grade/specification of oil that you would recommend?

Hi
There are different needs for Märklin gears:
- the historic Märklin production (1950 to 2000): winter grade motor oil is good (light machine oil is OK but a bit too fluid)
- the recent Märklin production (2000 to today): the Märklin oil (07149) is more fluid and formulated to avoid damaging plastic, now in constant use in transmissions). This is complemented by the Trix grease on worm gears (TR66626). Of course, ball bearings (SDS motors, etc) should be left alone
Cheers
Jean

My layout videos
latest vid
marshalling yard
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Offline MSan525  
#21 Posted : 30 May 2022 19:17:40(UTC)
MSan525

United States   
Joined: 07/02/2022(UTC)
Posts: 5
Location: Florida, Fort Myers
Thanks for the reply and info. So is it safe to say that lubricating oil from the early 1980s would've been synthetic with PTFE? I'll try searching online for Marklin oil and I can't locate a vendor I'll have a look at Labelle 107 or 108.


Originally Posted by: cookee_nz Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: MSan525 Go to Quoted Post
Apologies if this has been addressed but I couldn't find info specific to my question about lubrication for locomotives. I was at my local hobby shop checking out various oils and they all state on the packaging that they contain PTFE or teflon. Is that safe to use on Marklin locomotives from the early 1980s? Thanks in advance for any help or insight!


You could ask that question ten times and each time get a different answer.

Important thing to remember is that certainly up to the 60's and possibly a bit beyond, most lubricants were mineral, ie fossil fuels, and grease was often clay-based.

But for at least the past 20-30 years, synthetic lubricants have reigned supreme and have good properties.

Generally, the consensus also seems to be not to mix the two for best results but to be a purist in this regard would mean thoroughly cleaning out any old lubricants but that can also be quite invasive.

I've used modern lubricants on some quite old Loco's and had no issues.

Most model shops will stock good brands, such as the mentioned Labelle, Faller etc but some do have particular properties making them especially suitable for certain tasks such as lubricating plastics etc.

Cheers

Steve


PS - I'm not advising against Märklin's own oil, not for a second. I use it myself. But I think the question was more asking what 'other' oils could be used, if Märklin was not available at the local hobby shop.


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