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Offline harris19  
#1 Posted : 20 February 2021 18:10:18(UTC)
harris19

Greece   
Joined: 11/04/2011(UTC)
Posts: 75
Location: Greece
Hello to everybody.
i am having a problem with Roco cars in the video.attached.
They run on C track (24671) the first wheel jump the others no (maybe the second one a little).
Do you have experience how can i solve that problem ?
Some times they run without problem but mostly derails .
regards
Harris
WP_20210219_11_28_24_Pro_Trim.mp4 (17,669kb) downloaded 47 time(s).
Offline Copenhagen  
#2 Posted : 20 February 2021 20:24:17(UTC)
Copenhagen


Joined: 23/04/2019(UTC)
Posts: 114
It's a common phenomenon with non-Marklin cars when reversing through turnouts (though Roco stuff rarely have these kinds of problems).
It's probably because the wheels on the axle are spaced a bit too far apart. Take the axle off and press the wheels ever so slightly together. The wheels are probably DC wheels so one is embedded in plastic for isolation. It can be done by hand or maybe you'll need a vise or a tong of the poligrip type (there are special tools available also). You'll probably end up having to pull the wheels apart and together a few times to get it right. If you don't have a caliper to get the inside measure right you can visually compare the axle to a Maerklin axle to get the distance correct. (If the distance is too small you can get short circuits through turnouts - too big and you'll have derailments).

Another solution can be to change the wheels to AC wheels - if you can get the right kind. Another reason for derailments can be that the wheel flanges are too small. Marklins wheels always have larger flanges and a different flange profile which make them navigate better through turnouts.

If everything fails a solution is sometimes to turn the car around or place it so that it is not the rearmost car in the line.
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Copenhagen
Offline pederbc  
#3 Posted : 20 February 2021 20:46:20(UTC)
pederbc

Sweden   
Joined: 11/06/2007(UTC)
Posts: 109
Location: Eslöv, Sweden
Hi,

Thisis a coomon problem berween dc and ac wheels. Dc wheels have a distance of 14,2mm between the wheels on the shaft. Ac wheels have only 13,8mm. Seems a small difference but makes the difference! Either change to ac wheels or, if you have an apropriate tool, push one of the wheels on the shaft.

If you take a closer look at a turnout you will notice there are some plastic pieces on the inside of the rails. They also exists in the real world. When the wheelshaft run through the turnout it will make shure the wheels stay within the track and don’t hit the ”heart” in the turnout. Hope my explanation makes sense. If you compare the wheels from Roco and Märklin you will also notice that Roco wheels (dc) have a rather narrow ”inner side” (don’t know the name in english) and Märklin has rather wide and also a larger diameter.

Peder
thanks 2 users liked this useful post by pederbc
Offline harris19  
#4 Posted : 20 February 2021 20:56:28(UTC)
harris19

Greece   
Joined: 11/04/2011(UTC)
Posts: 75
Location: Greece
Originally Posted by: Copenhagen Go to Quoted Post
It's a common phenomenon with non-Marklin cars when reversing through turnouts (though Roco stuff rarely have these kinds of problems).
It's probably because the wheels on the axle are spaced a bit too far apart. Take the axle off and press the wheels ever so slightly together. The wheels are probably DC wheels so one is embedded in plastic for isolation. It can be done by hand or maybe you'll need a vise or a tong of the poligrip type (there are special tools available also). You'll probably end up having to pull the wheels apart and together a few times to get it right. If you don't have a ca;iber to get the inside measure right you can visually compare the axle to a Maerklin axle to get the distance correct. (If the distance is too small you can get short circuits through turnouts - too big and you'll have derailments).

Another solution can be to change the wheels to AC wheels - if you can get the right kind. Another reason for derailments can be that the wheel flanges are too small. Marklins wheels always have larger flanges and a different flange profile which make them navigate better through turnouts.

If everything fails a solution is sometimes to turn the car around or place it so that it is not the rearmost car in the line.


thank you for your answer ,
i will try by pressing them as you mentioned ,
secondly i will try to change the old ones with some spare Marklins wheels to see what will happen, in that case i will know the spare part i used.
thank you
stay healthy
Harris
Offline Copenhagen  
#5 Posted : 20 February 2021 21:06:26(UTC)
Copenhagen


Joined: 23/04/2019(UTC)
Posts: 114
It is quite possible that other Marklin wheels will fit in your Roco car. With other brands than Roco Marklin axles can be too long or the wheels too big and will not fit.
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Copenhagen
Offline harris19  
#6 Posted : 20 February 2021 21:09:19(UTC)
harris19

Greece   
Joined: 11/04/2011(UTC)
Posts: 75
Location: Greece
Originally Posted by: pederbc Go to Quoted Post
Hi,

Thisis a coomon problem berween dc and ac wheels. Dc wheels have a distance of 14,2mm between the wheels on the shaft. Ac wheels have only 13,8mm. Seems a small difference but makes the difference! Either change to ac wheels or, if you have an apropriate tool, push one of the wheels on the shaft.

If you take a closer look at a turnout you will notice there are some plastic pieces on the inside of the rails. They also exists in the real world. When the wheelshaft run through the turnout it will make shure the wheels stay within the track and don’t hit the ”heart” in the turnout. Hope my explanation makes sense. If you compare the wheels from Roco and Märklin you will also notice that Roco wheels (dc) have a rather narrow ”inner side” (don’t know the name in english) and Märklin has rather wide and also a larger diameter.

Peder


thank you Peder,
i am thinging cutting a piece of wood 13.8mm and put it between the shafts in order to obtain the right distance.
i think also that i can press only the one side (i am not sure for that ) Anyway this is the beauty of the hobby , collect ideas and try !
if i try the new wheels in my opinion i must use Maerklin ones and not Roco's for ac , do you agree ?
thank you again and stay healthy too
Harris
Offline harris19  
#7 Posted : 20 February 2021 21:11:13(UTC)
harris19

Greece   
Joined: 11/04/2011(UTC)
Posts: 75
Location: Greece
Originally Posted by: Copenhagen Go to Quoted Post
It is quite possible that other Marklin wheels will fit in your Roco car. With other brands than Roco Marklin axles can be too long or the wheels too big and will not fit.


it is ok , i have only some Roco cars and not other manufacturers
Offline rbw993  
#8 Posted : 20 February 2021 21:14:19(UTC)
rbw993

United States   
Joined: 19/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 763
Hi Harris,
The instructions that come with every car Roco sells list the Roc part for the AC wheelset. This usully is the best option because they will fit right. Wheel sets can also have axle lengths that are too short or too long to fit.

Roger
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Offline pederbc  
#9 Posted : 20 February 2021 21:16:05(UTC)
pederbc

Sweden   
Joined: 11/06/2007(UTC)
Posts: 109
Location: Eslöv, Sweden
Hi again,

Forhmann (I hope it’s the right name) in Germany sells tools just for this! They have one tool for removing or adding wheels to an axle, and also a tool with the two distances, 14,2 and 13,8mm. I use them a lot!

Peder
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Offline hxmiesa  
#10 Posted : 21 February 2021 08:35:59(UTC)
hxmiesa

Spain   
Joined: 15/12/2005(UTC)
Posts: 3,175
Location: Spain
Before, I used a hammer and two pieces of wood with holes in them. - Today I just press them together with my fingers and a slight turning movement.
Depending on the type of DC wheel, be careful not to move the flanges out of square.
Best regards
Henrik Hoexbroe ("The Dane In Spain")
http://hoexbroe.tripod.com
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by hxmiesa
Offline harris19  
#11 Posted : 21 February 2021 08:59:34(UTC)
harris19

Greece   
Joined: 11/04/2011(UTC)
Posts: 75
Location: Greece
Originally Posted by: pederbc Go to Quoted Post
Hi again,

Forhmann (I hope it’s the right name) in Germany sells tools just for this! They have one tool for removing or adding wheels to an axle, and also a tool with the two distances, 14,2 and 13,8mm. I use them a lot!

Peder


yes Peder this is the right name
thank you
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