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Offline oranda  
#1 Posted : 14 February 2018 17:23:17(UTC)
oranda

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/04/2014(UTC)
Posts: 122
Location: ENGLAND
Is there a diagram which describes the geometry of the Märklin rail parts?

There is nothing I can see in the recent Märklin catalogues.

If Ive got this right most curved tracks need 12 of them to make a complete circle, dependant on the radius, but I also need to know how the various straight track lengths relate to each other.

Thanks
Online Henrik Schütz  
#2 Posted : 14 February 2018 17:59:59(UTC)
Henrik Schütz

Sweden   
Joined: 04/08/2015(UTC)
Posts: 63
Location: Stockholms Lan, Stockholm
The length in mm is the last digits in the part no 24188 is 188 mm 24172 is 172 mm , with curves the two last digits denotes degrees 24430 is 30 degrees, the 4 in the middle stands for R4 would be 24130 if R1
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Offline midwestbls  
#3 Posted : 14 February 2018 18:58:57(UTC)
midwestbls

United States   
Joined: 04/06/2012(UTC)
Posts: 76
Originally Posted by: oranda Go to Quoted Post
Is there a diagram which describes the geometry of the Märklin rail parts?

There is nothing I can see in the recent Märklin catalogues.

If Ive got this right most curved tracks need 12 of them to make a complete circle, dependant on the radius, but I also need to know how the various straight track lengths relate to each other.

Thanks


The full Marklin catalog shows many diagrams about how the various Marklin C-track (and K-track) pieces work together. In the new 2017-2018 catalog start on pp. 214-215. You can also Google "Marklin C-track geometry" and there are a number of reference images posted.

As already noted, on the straights the last 3 digits show the lengths in mm. On the curves the 3rd digit shows the "radius" (243xx = R3, 244xx = R4, etc.), the last two digits show the degree of the curve (24x30 = 30-degrees).

You are correct that the "standard" curved track degree of curve is 30-degrees, meaning to make a full circle (360-deg) you need 12. But there are other compensating curves as well - for use as the complimentary curves to parallel the two tracks from a turnout (switch) (24224 = R2, 24.3-degrees for the regular turnouts; 24912 = 1,114.6mm radius, 12.1-degrees for the wide-radius turnouts) these can also be used as different-degree curves as needed. In the smaller radii (R1, R2 & R3) there are smaller degree compensation curves (24206 = 5.7-degrees (almost "6"), 24207 = 7.5-degrees ... 48 of those would make a full circle too!)

- Bill
ETE - Swiss Era III - BLS - Brig Station
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Offline Minok  
#4 Posted : 14 February 2018 21:07:55(UTC)
Minok

United States   
Joined: 15/10/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,255
Location: Washington, Pacific Northwest
Originally Posted by: oranda Go to Quoted Post
Is there a diagram which describes the geometry of the Märklin rail parts?



The track type (C/K/M/etc) of course is needed too.


Something like this?
UserPostedImage
Toys of tin and wood rule!
---
My Layout Thread on marklin-users.net: InterCity 1-3-4
My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Minok1217/
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Offline kimballthurlow  
#5 Posted : 14 February 2018 23:44:32(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 6,299
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Here is a really useful table of distances up to 1 metre, showing the straight C track combinations you can use to achieve a particular length.
I am not sure of copyright, so my apologies to the author.

https://www.marklin-users.net/up...86_cgleislangerTABLE.pdf

Kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep II-III and VI, C Track, digital) - 2 rail (Queensland Australia, UK, USA) - 3 rail (English Hornby Dublo) - old clockwork O gauge.
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Offline JohnjeanB  
#6 Posted : 13 March 2018 21:00:30(UTC)
JohnjeanB

France   
Joined: 04/02/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2,128
Location: Paris, France
Originally Posted by: oranda Go to Quoted Post
Is there a diagram which describes the geometry of the Märklin rail parts?

There is nothing I can see in the recent Märklin catalogues.

If Ive got this right most curved tracks need 12 of them to make a complete circle, dependant on the radius, but I also need to know how the various straight track lengths relate to each other.

Thanks

Good Evening

For those interested in C Track geometry may I suggest reading this topic in this forum: C Track Topics

Also you can create special tracks (straits with specific lengths or curve combinations / special angles) by
- cutting the track with a diamond disk and nicely filing and
- assembling the cutted tracks with hotmelt glue so as to obtain a new geometry C Rail with 2 C Track ends
- wiring the 3 connections of glued rail.

The resulting new C Rail section may be inserted anywhere in your C Track Layout

Cheers

Jean
My layout videos
latest vid
marshalling yard
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Offline TEEWolf  
#7 Posted : 31 March 2018 18:35:37(UTC)
TEEWolf


Joined: 01/06/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2,465
Originally Posted by: oranda Go to Quoted Post
Is there a diagram which describes the geometry of the Märklin rail parts?

There is nothing I can see in the recent Märklin catalogues.

If Ive got this right most curved tracks need 12 of them to make a complete circle, dependant on the radius, but I also need to know how the various straight track lengths relate to each other.

Thanks


I just read your topic and here is a link to a brochure Issued by märklin on its homepage. But I guess you only get access to it via the German homepage version. Maerklin issues plenty of informations, but mainly in German language and only with access at the German homepage.

https://www.maerklin.de/...C3%A4nzungspackungen.pdf





https://www.bogobit.de/track/

http://www.henningvoosen...nloads/cgleisrechner.htm

At the first sigth I hope this is allrigth to you.
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Offline DaleSchultz  
#8 Posted : 31 March 2018 18:57:23(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
Originally Posted by: kimballthurlow Go to Quoted Post
Here is a really useful table of distances up to 1 metre, showing the straight C track combinations you can use to achieve a particular length.
I am not sure of copyright, so my apologies to the author.

https://www.marklin-users.net/up...86_cgleislangerTABLE.pdf

Kimball


The Copyright is bogobit, on each page...

I had not seen that table before, and I notice lengths that cannot be achieved are listed at the end. I tried some of them in my track calculator and found many of those 'impossible' lengths that can be achieved to within less than 0,5mm
For example 798mm can be obtained exactly with:
24077 (x2) 77.5
24064 (x10) 64.3
so I suspect that the table is not exhaustive.

My track length calculator can be obtained at:
http://cabin-layout.blogspot.com/2002/05/track-length-calculator.html
Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
thanks 3 users liked this useful post by DaleSchultz
Offline DaleSchultz  
#9 Posted : 31 March 2018 19:02:21(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997


That calculator is limited to 9 pieces only. So the page declares that 1199mm cannot be solved.

It needs 11 pieces and can be solved exactly:

24188 (1) 188.3
24172 (3) 171.7
24071 (7) 70.8


Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
Offline TEEWolf  
#10 Posted : 31 March 2018 21:00:58(UTC)
TEEWolf


Joined: 01/06/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2,465
Originally Posted by: DaleSchultz Go to Quoted Post


That calculator is limited to 9 pieces only. So the page declares that 1199mm cannot be solved.

It needs 11 pieces and can be solved exactly:

24188 (1) 188.3
24172 (3) 171.7
24071 (7) 70.8


Did you also check the complete installation routine, which you get scrolling down the homepage to the bottom? It is a ZIP file. After expanding you get a CGleisrechner.exe file.

For my understanding you get more than these 9 possibilities there.

Offline DaleSchultz  
#11 Posted : 31 March 2018 23:35:16(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
Originally Posted by: TEEWolf Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: DaleSchultz Go to Quoted Post


That calculator is limited to 9 pieces only. So the page declares that 1199mm cannot be solved.

It needs 11 pieces and can be solved exactly:

24188 (1) 188.3
24172 (3) 171.7
24071 (7) 70.8


Did you also check the complete installation routine, which you get scrolling down the homepage to the bottom? It is a ZIP file. After expanding you get a CGleisrechner.exe file.

For my understanding you get more than these 9 possibilities there.


Good.

I went by the first paragraph that states that it uses up to 9 pieces.
Quote:
Der C-Gleisrechner errechnet alle kombinierbaren Gleislängen, die mit 9 geraden märklin C-Gleisen erreicht werden können
.
I do not see more than one calculator.
It goes on to say that there is no solution for 1199mm
Quote:
Für eine Länge von 1.199 mm gibt es keine Gleiskombination


Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
Offline MaerklinLife  
#12 Posted : 01 April 2018 07:50:30(UTC)
MaerklinLife


Joined: 03/02/2016(UTC)
Posts: 490
Originally Posted by: DaleSchultz Go to Quoted Post
I had not seen that table before, and I notice lengths that cannot be achieved are listed at the end. I tried some of them in my track calculator and found many of those 'impossible' lengths that can be achieved to within less than 0,5mm

I usually work with 2 - 3 mm wiggle room. It works fine. 0,5 mm difference is an acceptable match in my eye.
Offline TEEWolf  
#13 Posted : 02 April 2018 22:25:31(UTC)
TEEWolf


Joined: 01/06/2016(UTC)
Posts: 2,465
Originally Posted by: DaleSchultz Go to Quoted Post
Kombinierbaren Gleislängen, die mit 9 geraden märklin C-Gleisen erreicht werden können
I do not see more than one calculator.
It goes on to say that there is no solution for 1199mm
Für eine Länge von 1.199 mm gibt es keine Gleiskombination



Dale,
I think it is up to everybody himself calculating his track combinations. I only suggest tools to him making his life perhaps easier. I do not feel I have to sell this track calculator. You also may use the 2 tables regarding to track length, etc. at the links in my post #7 too.

Good tracking timesBlink

TEEWolf
Offline DaleSchultz  
#14 Posted : 02 April 2018 22:36:07(UTC)
DaleSchultz

United States   
Joined: 10/02/2006(UTC)
Posts: 3,997
I never said anyone should use any particular calculator either, just pointing out limitations that I saw in one of them, and responding to other statements.

The two tools are hardly comparable, one is simple, static and incomplete table (and is platform independent), the other is comprehensive, handles K, C and M tracks and also calculates lengths at various angles and ability to control tolerance limits, but needs Windows. I get zero benefit from anyone using mine.

Dale
Intellibox + own software, K-Track
My current layout: https://cabin-layout.mixmox.com
Arrival and Departure signs: https://remotesign.mixmox.com
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