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Offline W3Machinist  
#1 Posted : 01 February 2019 16:38:56(UTC)
W3Machinist

United States   
Joined: 19/01/2019(UTC)
Posts: 33
Location: North Carolina, Locust
I recently read of people using wd-40 to lubricate their locomotives, my experience shows this is a bad idea.

To all - PLEASE DO NOT USE wd-40, when it dries it becomes gummy and a negative lubricant. A light oil is much better in all reguards.

Best to all,
Woody
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Offline stockerta  
#2 Posted : 01 February 2019 17:28:28(UTC)
stockerta

Hungary   
Joined: 30/07/2018(UTC)
Posts: 31
Location: Gyor-Moson-Sopron, Sopron
I use wd-40 to clean up the old gunk, and also to free the switches.
Offline W3Machinist  
#3 Posted : 01 February 2019 18:57:42(UTC)
W3Machinist

United States   
Joined: 19/01/2019(UTC)
Posts: 33
Location: North Carolina, Locust
Originally Posted by: stockerta Go to Quoted Post
I use wd-40 to clean up the old gunk, and also to free the switches.


Because of the advertising for wd-40 many people think it is good for everything. It is not.

My experience is this I was working with a metrology department, and asked about wd-40 to clean their measuring blocks. The polite response (I didn't get) is that it would cause their measurement blocks to: 1) stick togather, some were destroyed getting them apart. 2) leaves a film that caused incorect measurement.

They clean with a light OIL then polish with a cotton cloth. Theses blocks are so precisely ground and pollished that they have to slide them onto and off of each other. When stacked together you can pick up the stack without them seperating. They must be slid appart which wd-40 does not allow with ease.

There are other PLASTIC SAFE PENETRATING OILS, and speciality oils ON THE MARKET. Pick one for your area that is easily available, AFTER YOU CHECK ITS PROPERTIES, and peoples experience with it.

Lube carefully,
WoodyMellow Cool BigGrin
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Offline RayF  
#4 Posted : 01 February 2019 19:57:31(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,230
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Thanks for the warning, which we get regularly here on the forum.

Although it's not good for everything it is quite useful for de-greasing a loco that's all gummed up from over-oiling, and its electrical conducting properties mean that sometimes a little squirt will fix that stubborn loco that refuses to run smoothly because of bad contact.

For normal lubrication I use Marklin oil and Trix grease as recommended, but this only works on a loco that's nice and clean internally already.
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
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Offline Dave Banks  
#5 Posted : 01 February 2019 22:24:08(UTC)
Dave Banks

Australia   
Joined: 08/03/2006(UTC)
Posts: 846
Location: Gold Coast, Australia.
Well for the boys Downunder we have the best product. It's called "Inox". The only lubricant in the world with the special MX3 anti-corrosion, anti-moisture formula for the twenty – first century.

Over the years INOX MX3 has become known as the “Supreme Lubricant” and the go to product when the highest of quality is needed. The special MX3 anti-corrosion, anti-moisture formula is now sought after all around the globe making it one of the leading lubricants in the world today.

These qualities make it safe for almost every market out there including: Automotive, aviation, commercial, domestic, electrical & electronics, engineering, farming & mining, firearms, fishing, hobbies, manufacturing, marine, motorcycles, sports and transport.

It does not damage paint & won't dry out. Simply a great product & I use it extensively on my Marklin products given the high humidity we have over the summer on the Gold Coast.

They claim the following:

The manufacturers of INOX also claim their product is the best out there as well! From their website:

INOX contains no silicon, acid, kerosene or dieselene.
INOX will not harm metal points or surfaces, plastics, paints, enamels, fibreglass, formica or neoprene seals.
INOX doesn't dry out, gum up, become gooey or sticky
or wash off with water !
INOX is non- conductive, non-static, non-toxic, non-corrosive
and non-staining.

D.A.Banks
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Offline stockerta  
#6 Posted : 02 February 2019 09:13:52(UTC)
stockerta

Hungary   
Joined: 30/07/2018(UTC)
Posts: 31
Location: Gyor-Moson-Sopron, Sopron
Originally Posted by: RayF Go to Quoted Post
Thanks for the warning, which we get regularly here on the forum.

Although it's not good for everything it is quite useful for de-greasing a loco that's all gummed up from over-oiling, and its electrical conducting properties mean that sometimes a little squirt will fix that stubborn loco that refuses to run smoothly because of bad contact.

For normal lubrication I use Marklin oil and Trix grease as recommended, but this only works on a loco that's nice and clean internally already.


Same here, but probably my first comment wasn't clear. Blushing
Offline MalinAC  
#7 Posted : 02 February 2019 10:22:28(UTC)
MalinAC

Ireland   
Joined: 29/05/2014(UTC)
Posts: 815
Location: DONEGAL, CARNDONAGH
I use Labelle 104 synthetic oil and Labelle 106 teflon grease which I have used for over 20 years with no problems. Eddie Cool
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Offline river6109  
#8 Posted : 02 February 2019 11:08:57(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 12,304
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
I would like to use extra virgin olive oil but I can't get my hands on one.
https://www.youtube.com/river6109
https://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
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Offline RayF  
#9 Posted : 02 February 2019 16:46:45(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 15,230
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Originally Posted by: river6109 Go to Quoted Post
I would like to use extra virgin olive oil but I can't get my hands on one.


One of my friends tried to lubricate his slot cars with olive oil once. The cars didn't run at all well but the smell was lovely!

BigGrin
Ray
Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
Offline kiwiAlan  
#10 Posted : 02 February 2019 19:11:31(UTC)
kiwiAlan

United Kingdom   
Joined: 23/07/2014(UTC)
Posts: 4,084
Location: ENGLAND, Didcot
Originally Posted by: river6109 Go to Quoted Post
I would like to use extra virgin olive oil but I can't get my hands on one.


Try here ... Laugh Laugh Laugh
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