Welcome to the forum   
Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

4 Pages<1234>
Share
Options
View
Go to last post in this topic Go to first unread post in this topic
Offline kariosls37  
#101 Posted : 27 January 2012 05:37:08(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Last weekend I picked up my set of drawings again and started another wagon. The ten members of this uilt by the Nederlandsche Rhijnspoorweg(NRS) in 1867. I couldn't resist the look of the brakeman's hut, so one had to be built.
Again, the wagon was capable of carrying 10 tons of coal. After the assets of the NRS were split over the SS and HSM just after the turn of the century these wagons ended up in the fleet of the SS.

As usual, the frame was built first, being glued onto the wagon floor
UserPostedImage
After the walls of the wagons were cut and the inside planks scribed, they were attached to the base. to the right is the space for the brakeman.
UserPostedImage
some framing was next up. These wagons had wood frames, which is why they are so thick.
UserPostedImage
On the other end the hinges and reinforcing for the swing door was attached, and reinforcing was also glued to the side doors. These wagons had doors that swing down, instead of the usual way of having the doors swing sideways. I have no idea why, it may be so that the wagon is easier to unload onto a cart.
UserPostedImage
This is the result of a saturday afternoon's modelling. Things have gone quite quickly as I had worked out how most of the details should look already, instead of spending time looking up pictures of simular wagons.
More will follow tomorrow.

Cheers,
Rick
Offline steventrain  
#102 Posted : 27 January 2012 07:38:33(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,274
Location: Northern Ireland
Looking good, Rick.
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline river6109  
#103 Posted : 27 January 2012 10:39:39(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Rick,

Will follow this to end again.ThumpUp

John
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline kariosls37  
#104 Posted : 28 January 2012 09:16:26(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Steven and John

Continuing on from the previous day, I started building the brakeman's shelter, or Checkpoint Charlie as I call it. I think you will see why. The hut is made from diffrent v-groove styrene to represent the diffrent type of planking. The insides were scribed as well as you can see the inside quite clearly
UserPostedImage
As you can see, it's not the most comfortable accomodation.
And from another angle;
UserPostedImage
To finish off the day's modelling I added the handbrake itself, and the nice curved roof. I also poured in some loose coal to see how it looks.
UserPostedImage

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#105 Posted : 29 January 2012 09:53:08(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
The next job was filing out and fitting the W irons. I used some blanks I made previously, so they only needed a little bit of tidying up. Pinpoint bearings were then soldered in. To make fitting axleboxes easier later on the bearings were filed as flat as possible. The W irons were then glued to the frames and wheels were fitted. The bearings, axles and wheels are the only things not produced in house.
And this is how it all looks on it's feet
UserPostedImage

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#106 Posted : 30 January 2012 09:54:22(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Following on from yesterday's post, the W irons were dressed up. Axleboxes are DIY cast resin ones, drilled and fitted onto the bearings. Springs are from my supply of pre-made details and the rest is styrene. Resin buffer shrouds were also fitted. I made the moulds for these while building the previous wagons. The origionals are part of another wagon.
UserPostedImage
The buffers themselves have also been built up, ready for turning to the right shape once the glue sets.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#107 Posted : 31 January 2012 09:35:56(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Looking at the wagon, the left hand buffer is rounded, the right hand one is not. My buffers started life as 0.5mm styrene punched out with a sharpened brass tube. 1mm styrene rod was glued on for the shafts. Once the glue had set, I put them in my cordless drill and shaped two buffers into rounded ones with a file. These were then glued onto the wagon.
UserPostedImage
Signal brackets were also attached, sourced from my box of pre made parts. The lock for the door was also made up and attached.

The brakehouse is not only for decoration(although it looks cool), so the brakes were next up. Brake blocks were again pulled from my little box of parts, and wire brake rods and styrene hangers were attached to them. because I can, I modelled the brake rigging as well, again using styrene and brass wire.
UserPostedImage
Note the absence of air brake equipment, which was not deemed neccesary on these wagons. Once everything is bacck up the right way, this is the view you get.
UserPostedImage
That just leaves a few final few details to do, and then it's time again for some airbrushing.

Cheers,
Rick


PS. the person who thought that the backspace button is a good shortcut to "go back to the previous page" should be shot. I had to write this post twice because of thisCursing
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#108 Posted : 02 February 2012 07:49:20(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Following on from the last post, details were added. All the usual stuff, hand grabs, stirrup steps and the like. Having a brakeman's hut, one corner required a more elaborate step, the bottom two steps soldered from nickel silver strip and brass wire. The top step is styrene, and sits on one of the buffers.
UserPostedImage
UserPostedImage
And that leaves the wagon finished and ready for painting.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#109 Posted : 07 February 2012 09:41:52(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
When the luggage trolley recieved it's primer coat, the wagon recieved a coat of grey. This weekend the underframe was done in black, and on the following days small details were touched up. The roof also got a sand colour. The area didn't warrant an airbrushing session, so it has been done by hand. This is the result, ready for a coat of varnish.
UserPostedImage
Between painting I have started an exiting new project, more will follow soon.

In the meantime, thanks for watching,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#110 Posted : 10 February 2012 10:21:20(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
The next project is the NS 5301.
This is the loco in question, in the town of Assen in 1932.
UserPostedImage
Borrowed from Het Utrechts Archief
Because heavy main line engines are not seen on light local railways, and because the location of the photo fits into future layout plans, I had to get one of these kits. They were made 10 years ago, but a re-run and and a bit of fortune allowed me to secure one.
Two engines were built for the NRS by Sharp, Stewart & Co in 1880. Eight engines where then ordered by the Nederlandse Zuid-Ooster Spoorweg Maatschappij in two batches, in 1881 and 1882. My engine started life as the NZOS 1, Sharp, Stewart & Co maker's number 2951. A merger later and she became SS 267 before becoming NS 5301 after the SS and HSM merged to become the NS. The class of 10 engines were all scrapped between 1925 and 1935, which allows the engine to just fit into my modelling era.

This is what is inside the kit:
Etched 0.3mm brass;
UserPostedImage
The motor and some cast brass bits;
UserPostedImage
More brass bits;
UserPostedImage
And some other parts including pickup wipers and the plates;
UserPostedImage
Beautiful cast nickel silver wheels are also present, but the photo didn't turn out too flash, so they will appear later.

Last week I started building the kit, starting with soldering the frame together.
UserPostedImage
There's plenty of detail there, inside and out...
The frames are constructed in such a way that they are wider in the middle, allowing tighter curves to be negotiated.

More will follow soon.
Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#111 Posted : 11 February 2012 10:36:01(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
To the frames the first detail was added, in the shape of hornblocks. They exist to guide the axleboxes up and down to compensate for uneven track, In model form they do the same. They consist of two parts on the leading and trailing axles, and this is supplemented by four tiny gusset plates measuring less than 1mm for the driving wheels. Great detail, but those tiny gusset plates do shoot out of twezers real fast. Good thing there's a few extra on the etchCool
Also added were the springs for the rear axle, made up of three layers, resulting in a 0.9mm thick part. Operating rods for the drop grate were also added.
UserPostedImage
The internal motion, two sets of Stephenson's valvegear and two cranks and connecting rods were made up. This all fits in between the frames.Drool
UserPostedImage
Finally, on another subassembly, the air reservoir and the brake cylinder casting were attached. More detail that can only really be seen when the frame is at eye level.
UserPostedImage

This kit is not for beginners, as it takes a good understanding of how brass kits are constructed. However, with the required knowledge, this is a fun kit to build, and everything fits really nicely. To top it off, the frame of this has about the same level of detail you would expect a whole ready-made loco to haveDrool

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline steventrain  
#112 Posted : 11 February 2012 11:11:33(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,274
Location: Northern Ireland
Excellent process, I like the wagon.ThumpUp
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline mvd71  
#113 Posted : 11 February 2012 20:22:16(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
It will be three rail digital won't it Rick? BigGrin
Offline river6109  
#114 Posted : 12 February 2012 00:47:41(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Im getting itchy, I may start doing it myself one day.
When you look at the detail and its all out of brass, this is a different ball game all together.
It's fun watching your process.

John
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline steventrain  
#115 Posted : 12 February 2012 07:36:07(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,274
Location: Northern Ireland
Originally Posted by: kariosls37 Go to Quoted Post


UserPostedImage
The internal motion, two sets of Stephenson's valvegear and two cranks and connecting rods were made up. This all fits in between the frames.Drool

Thanks for watching,
Rick


Have you test on turnouts and 1st radius curved such as 24130?
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline kariosls37  
#116 Posted : 12 February 2012 10:22:53(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Mike, digital - definetely. Three rail - wait 'till you've seen the underside of this beautyWink

John, I'm glad you like it. From seeing your work, you would have no trouble building a brass kit provided you don't get too ambitious and start with something easy like a wagon. And from experience I can tell you that once you start, you will never want to stop...

Stephen, R1 is out of the question for this loco, and I have not bothered to test it. Brass kits are not designed for tight curves, as it would compromise too much on detail. Just compare the flanges of this loco(RP 25 code 80) to the pizza cutter flanges on Marklin models. However, it easily negotiates the #4 points on my Dutch layout, which is roughly R2, but for most brass models this is the absolute limit, if not impossible. This is a complete diffrent kettle of fish to ready to run Marklin models.

On the modelling front, the cylinder block was assembled, and cylinder covers were added before the motion was soldered in, followed by some piston rods. It was then time to solder the frames together.
UserPostedImage
The kit provides for the front and rear axles to be sprung, using a bit of 0.35mm spring steel wire pushing on the middle of the axle. Both sets of driving wheels are stuck rigidly in the frame. I was not satisfied with this, as experience with the NS 3931 has proven that rigid chassis don't pull as much because on anything but dead level track there's only going to be three wheels on the track.
Putting a spring on the rear drivers was not an option, because the gears are on that axle. That just left one choice. Another bit of spring steel was soldered on the inside of a frame stay just behind the leading drivers. The wire is barely visible as it sits snugly between the two pairs of eccentrics for the valvegear. After a bit of work on the bearings on that axle, everything slides up and down nicely, and works as intended.
UserPostedImage
You can just see the spring between the eccentrics on the photo. This will make the model run realistically over bumps, instead of bouncing over them like any rigid frame locos like Marklin's steamers.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#117 Posted : 17 February 2012 04:41:04(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
With the chassis done, it's time to mae a start with the top bits. th efirst thing were the front and rear walls, again rich in detail.
UserPostedImage
Next up is the boiler. This comes as a flat bit of etch, which is carefully rolled over a towel followed by some careful bending to get it round. A bit of filing to get it to the right diameter folowed by a touch of solder results in a nice round boiler and a tiny silver line visible on the underside
UserPostedImage
The barrel is then combined with the firebox and the front cab wall to form one part. The gap between the firebox and boiler barrel will later be filled with a polished brass casting once the painting is done.
UserPostedImage
And then my soldeing iron decided to stop working. This was on a Saturday evening(yes, I'm a little behind in posting stuff here) so instead of doing brass modelling, I grabbed my knife, some styrene and started building anothe coal wagon.
More will follow soon...

Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#118 Posted : 23 February 2012 09:47:09(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I've been busy over the last week, but here is the story of the next coal wagon. It will be the last 10 ton one for now, being built for the Noord-Brabant Duitsche Spoorweg Maatschappij (North Brabant-German Railway Co), NBDS for short. The class has the running numbers 35816-35846, built in 1873 by Werkspoor.

The usual method was followed, and this is the result of the weekend's modelling;
UserPostedImage
The basic body is complete and runnable, ready for detailing.

Buffers were also made up. These take two days to make, as the glue has to dry fully before continueing.
Discs of styrene are punched using a punch made from a brass tube. A short length of 1mm styrene rod is glued to this.
UserPostedImage
Once the glue is dry the shank of the buffer is held in the cordless drill, and using a file the burrs are taken off, and every second one is filed round, which is easy to do with a reasonably sharp file and the cordelss drill going. This method is pretty quick and easy to do. As buffers are another of those standard parts, more are made than will be needed, which speeds up the building of later wagons

That's all for now, more will follow soon.
Cheers,
Rick
Offline river6109  
#119 Posted : 23 February 2012 13:19:31(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
As usual, top stuff
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline Yumgui  
#120 Posted : 23 February 2012 18:07:27(UTC)
Yumgui

United States   
Joined: 20/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,638
Location: Paris, France
Rick ThumpUp
If your M track is rusted ... DON'T throw it out !
Working on : http://www.arep.fr/en/#/welcome
Inspired by : http://www.nakedmarklin.com/ ... I am not alone in this universe, phew.
Offline kariosls37  
#121 Posted : 24 February 2012 22:07:55(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks John and YumThumpUp

Monday saw further progress, which was mostly focused on adding all the running gear details. Springs and axleboxes came from my box of pre-made stuff. Spring hangers and the like were built to suit. Latches on the doors were also made. On this wagon the door tips down instead of swinging to the side, so that had to be taken into account as well. The buffers were then also installed, followed by latches for the end doors
UserPostedImage
Tuesday saw the rest of the details being added. some from my box of bits, and some made to suit, finishing the build of the wagon, done in just four days.
UserPostedImage
Some details on the end of the wagon;
UserPostedImage
Now that I have a new soldering iron, I will be able to continue with the locomotive, and progress will of course be posted here.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
Offline Mark5  
#122 Posted : 25 February 2012 08:57:10(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Just discovered this thread. Thanks so much for continuing to post your little masterpieces.
Seriously, I love the work and its giving me loads of ideas. So much more I wish I had time to write about.

One thing I was unclear about, are these for use on a Marklin layout, with Marklin couplings, wheels and axels (width being a tiny bit wider, I understand)?

I have been thinking about taking other HO material/rolling stock/locos and Marklinizing them.
Thats another thread I guess.

Sorry if I missed this in your thread, but you got all the kits from the shop?
Anywhere they can be mail ordered from?

Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#123 Posted : 25 February 2012 20:14:12(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks MarkThumpUp

These are not built for running on a Marklin layout specifically, and as such do not have Marklin wheels or couplers. The rolling stock is mainly for running on my DC layout, Nieuweveenschekanaal, which can be found here
The wheels are RP 25 code 100, which is more or less the standard flange for all American models. It looks much better IMHO, but it will derail more easily. You could fit Marklin axles to the wagons, but their flanges are absolutely massive compared to the wheels I've got. Couplers are KADEE, which is quite popular among scratchbuilders because they are smaller than most European couplers, couple really gently and uncouple without visible uncouplers.
However, all of this does not preclude it's running on modern K track and C track provided the radius is not too tight(R2 is the absolute limit) and the track is laid well. I have run these wagons on the Auckland Marklin Club C track modular layout, with mixed results, but that was mainly due to not having proper couplers(the screw link type are not really suited to anything except very generous curves) The NS 3931 has also done laps of that layout without problems.

All the styrene stuff is scratchbuilt, and the only things I order in are the wheels, bearings, axles and couplers. The first three I get from North Yard the couplers come from the local hobby shop.
The brass kits come from small manufacturers, mostly run by one or two people part-time. The NS 3931 came from DJH, the brass wagons came from MK Modelbouwstudio's and the locomotive I'm building now is from Werps Modelbouw
The last two manufacturers do not sell to shops, only at some exhibitions in Holland and via mail order. North Yard is almost exclusively mail order and DJH is mail order as well as selling to a small few shops.

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Mark5  
#124 Posted : 27 February 2012 18:15:08(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Thanks so much for the info! I will tuck this into my "to do" file.

I would like to have a module on my set with Dutch landscape and trains from mostly Era 2 and 3.
But either way the thing I would really like is to kit or scratch build some cars and loks and have them able to run on a Marklin set.

Do you know anyone doing that?

- Mark

Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#125 Posted : 28 February 2012 02:46:07(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
No worries Mark.

The more the merrier I'd say, There is little in the way of ready to run rolling stock available from before the war, except for a few tank cars, the odd closed van and some modern(for that time) coal wagons. However, Artitec has just delivered many variants of the SS 700/NS 3700 4-6-0 express engine for era I-III plus the museum livery. and they have announced a few carriages and to go with it. A guard's van is also being delivered now. This is all mainstream and therefore Marklin compatible. The SS 700/NS 3700 is also available for 3-rail.

As for someone who is building this stuff for more adventurous track, this link takes you to the photobucket album of someone who builds NS rolling stock mostly from the frames of old wagons and locomotives, which will run on older track. Symoba sells NEM close coupling units, but KADEE's are just as good IMHO, and you can get NEM compatible KADEE's for any standard models too. On that album there is also a complete set of general arrangement drawings containing everyting with wheels that couldn't move itself the NS had in 1924, and a lot of older drwaings with more detail as well. This is where I get almost all of my drawings from.
These two liks are also from that person.
http://www.tkontjevandezalm.nl/index.php?page=1
http://s620.photobucket.com/albums/tt281/meukemmer_van_floortje/
The latter one is especially useful as it contains reasonably good artwork for number plates and it has some good photos on carriages too. At the moment I am drawing up more artwork in vector format as well so I can get someone to print them for me. The problem is I keep building more stuff, so I have to keep on drawing. The standard layout is the same for locomotives and rolling stock though, so it gets easier as I go along.
For all of this knowledge of Dutch is pretty important, but except for that the information is pretty available.
For photos Het Utrechts Archief is very useful, with thousands of good quality pictures from the NS archives.

Good luck,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Mark5  
#126 Posted : 10 March 2012 21:46:47(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
I met a guy here in Montreal that builds brass locomotives and been wondering if you know anyone who has built them with Marklin engines?
Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#127 Posted : 15 March 2012 07:14:05(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
If you go back a page you will see that my first engine, the NS 3931 will run with other Marklin stuff. With a bit of cunning and a wagon carrying a slider the NS 5301 will also run on Marklin track.
As for people who have used Marklin engines as a base for building other engines, I only seen two examples, one where the Trix BR74 was chopped up to become a Indonesian tank loco. The other's on this forum where someone is modifying a former BR55 to match a Danish engine. However, I think there are some reasons why it is not done as often;
-Marklin is not as big as 2-rail, and as can be seen from this forum, the vast majority will not go much further than assembling Faller ect. kitsets, which I think is partly due to the fact that Marklin is more oriented around collecting than hands on modelling. Notable exceptions excluded of course!
-Cost and availability. People will not tend to chop up models that cost 400Euro to buy. A lot of cheap 2-rail donor engines are readily available, with the same or better detail than some of Marklin's models, unless you want to buy 1960's/70's old stuff, which is a bit of a waste of time when you are building a brass body around it.
-Detailing; For starters, Marklin makes models with huge flanges compared to brass standards and even many other European brands. Punched steel rods also look very crude compared to etched brass stuff. The most likely candidates
-Metal details are also a bit harder to chop up and adjust than plastic ones.

Now, I'll just go back into my trench and await the oncoming fire...BigGrin


However, there's nothing stopping you from chopping up Marklin models to get the loco you've always wanted. (oh yeah, the purists might, but that has never stopped meFlapper Flapper )The big advantage is that you have a well running chassis which means you only have to build the bits that look pretty.

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#128 Posted : 18 March 2012 08:10:41(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
No incoming fire so far, so I'll dare to stick my head above the trench nowBigGrin

The building part of this thread has been neglected a little bit lately. Since moving my workshop to somewhere else has not made it any easier to do soldering, the pace of the locomotive construction has slowed right down. However, I still spend the occasional evening on the project, and work is progressing.
As soon as I finished the coal wagon it was back to the locomotive. The sides consist of a sub frame that looks a bit like the inside of an aircraft wing, onto which the detailed sides sit.
UserPostedImage
The side sheets went on without too much of a fuss, but the coal bunker has curved corners, and the edges of both sheets have to line up with the rear sheet, which meets at the rear of the cab. It took me about a week of soldering and unsoldering before I was happy with my handiwork, but the time has paid off and it looks really good now.
UserPostedImage
and from the rear;
UserPostedImage
does my bunker look big in this?
Some strips on the cab were then soldered on, where the top of the cab would seperate to allow it to be lifted off. The plates were a later addition, so some rivets had to be carefully removed to allow the plates to fit nicely.
Details like handrail posts, washout plug plates and some appendages were also attached to the boiler. Unfortunately no photos as I can't get at the camera in my new workshopGlare

That's all for now, mor will follow soon.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
Offline Mark5  
#129 Posted : 20 March 2012 02:49:46(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Looks Great Rick. I will watch the progression. I couldn't say if the bunker looks too big, since I don't know the prototype you are working from. (No expert on the history of loks, but learning)

I do agree with your comment on how Marklin seems centered on collecting rather than building models. Guys want the models to run the way they run, which is brilliantly, and why bother modeling if they are close to "perfection" anyway. ... I see that.

I wasn't actually thinking of breaking up the bodies, so much, although alterations seem like a pretty good idea, I was more interested in the possibility of making a great running engine that would still run brilliantly on Marklin track, even maybe/eventually with a digital decoder.

I don't mind if the flanges are big, that gives them stability on the Marklin track, but I love the whole feel of the brass engines when completed, and the idea of having a Marklin-compatible engine that is not made by Marklin. (BTW Can't stand the one's that are just shiny brass...they must be painted with some degree of 'realism' to me)

Aside from the Dutch trains (NS) (btw thanks for those links, been looking at them), I have also been thinking of some old Canadian steam engines and even some recent Canadian trains, that, as far as I know, do not have AC 3-rail "marklinized" versions.

Does anyone know of Canadian train models that run on Marklin, other then the few CN boxcars and the Northlander?

Either way, keep up with the posts. Even if you do/don't get "oncoming fire" no doubt people are reading your posts.

- Mark

Edited by user 20 March 2012 02:57:52(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#130 Posted : 21 March 2012 08:58:13(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Mark. Unfortunately I haven't been able to take too many photos of the detailing, but some will follow after another little break.

If you want to turn a donor engine into a Dutch model, you will probably run into problems pretty quick if you don't want to alter much of the loco. The way German engines are constructed is very diffrent from the way the Dutch did it, even down to the basic stuff like wheel arrangements. For example, most goods trains in Holland in era II were pulled by mostly six-coupled locos, while German goods trains were most often pulled by ten-coupled locos in the same period.
Many scratchbuilders use a donor chassis, strip usable details and discard the rest, sometimes the wheels as well, replacing them by others to get the right size.

Most other European mainstream models will be able to negotiate Marklin track without any problems, although some modern models may not like R1. The most difficult bit will usually be mounting a slider, which should not be hard provided there is room. Digital's no problem, brass models are no harder to install decoders into than any analog engine, although there is more metal around for making short circuits.

Brass is nice to have, although I have no problems in models made from styrene or resin or any other material. Whatever's right for the job is what counts for me. A good example is my wagons, which are quickly, easily and cheaply built out of styrene. However, the W-irons(the bits that hold the axleboxes and therefore wheels in place) are brass, because styrene is not strong enough. Brass bearings are used because they are readily available, cheap and a good bearing. I could make them out of say, styrene, but that would wear out quickly, not run as well and it would take me ages.

Old Canadian locos could be a bit harder, because of the more or less standard RP25 wheel with much smaller flanges than mainstream European stuff, which is what is on my wagons as well. They are generally not designed for tighter curves either, although 18" seems to be a more or less standard minimum for shorther engines which corresponds to R2. Rolling stock should not pose too many problems, even with the smaller flange because everything sits on bogies, which are quite forgiving to bad track(which is why they are so universal on that side of the Atlantic in the first place) Longer passenger carriages may have some problems with tight curves though. Couplers can be left in place, provided the trip pins don't snag on the third rail. The best way is to buy one or two and try them on Marklin track. You'll soon find out if they work or not. You will probably also be able to get wheelsets with larger flanges from somewhere as well if you look around.

Part of this is just theory based on what I've seen and read, but a big part of it is just giving it a go. I started out with some simple kitsets two years ago, and now I'm scratchbuilding rolling stock and building brass locos without problems, and once some wheels arrive, I will start on something more challenging than that... I could read books for weeks on end and learn the theory begind modelling, but I would learn a heap more by just building in that same week. So my best advice is, buy an easy, reasonably cheap wagon kitset, build it and build your skills up from there.

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Mark5  
#131 Posted : 22 March 2012 16:09:52(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Originally Posted by: kariosls37 Go to Quoted Post


[.....]

Part of this is just theory based on what I've seen and read, but a big part of it is just giving it a go. I started out with some simple kitsets two years ago, and now I'm scratchbuilding rolling stock and building brass locos without problems, and once some wheels arrive, I will start on something more challenging than that... I could read books for weeks on end and learn the theory begind modelling, but I would learn a heap more by just building in that same week. So my best advice is, buy an easy, reasonably cheap wagon kitset, build it and build your skills up from there.

Cheers,
Rick


Thanks Rick,

That is all great advice and great info. I have been a fair bit of reading and find myself just longing to get back to tinkering and getting my hands dirty.
Getting a wagon kit seems an ideal start. Then as far as "marklinizing" the wagon all I will worry about is the couplings and wheel flange.

More later, I have take it stride, I have plenty on my plate with just repairing and getting running several old Marklin loks at the moment.

Dank u wel!
Mark

Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#132 Posted : 23 March 2012 23:48:31(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Veel geluk Mark.

As mentioned before, it's time for another little break. This involves more styrene, in the form of another two coal wagons.
Like most others, the various Dutch railway companies started switching to heavier wagons after a while. The next step up from a wagon with a 10 ton capacity was a 15 ton capacity. These were given the classification GL and numbers in the 40000 range. The first is one from the series 41167-41176 built by the Nederlandsche Rhijnspoorweg Maatschappij(NRS) in their own workshops in 1887. The other wagon is from the larger series 41861-42159 built for the SS in 1901.

Both were started at the same time, being built when I didn't feel like picking up a soldering iron. All the usual methods were followed, resulting in the basic bodies:
First up is the NRS wagon. More or less a stretched out 10 ton wagon.
UserPostedImage
This wagon had me looking from the frame to the drawing and back a couple of times, because the thing is almost two metres longer than a 10t wagon, while the wheelbase was more or less the same, resluting in a lot of overhang on the ends which is not common on the little 10t wagons. I also managed to find a photo of this wagon, which makes the details a bit quicker to make.

The other wagon;
UserPostedImage
This one's a bit younger, and looks a bit sturdier and more modern as a result. It is a fair bit wider than the others as well as having removable sides, so instead of channels, the sides are held together by steel with a T-section, which was easily made from a bit of 1x0.25 mm and 0.5x0.25mm styrene. Having steel doors, rivet strips were made and glued, which the other wagon recieved as well. My rivet strips are made from 0.75x0.25mm styrene into which the rivets are punched with a scriber. It's a tedious job, but the results do pay off.

Both wagons have an almost identical running gear, being the more modern W1 type axlebox from my DIY resin castings and 15 ton springs, which are longer than 10 ton ones. W-irons are the more modern trapezium shaped ones found under most four wheeled goods wagons on your layouts. The only diffrence between the two wagons are the spring hangers, which are the HSM type on the older wagon, as the wagon became property of the HSM once the NRS was split up between the HSM and the SS. The SS wagon, of course has the SS type spring hanger.
Unfortunately you'll have to imagine this for now, as I didn't make any photos.

Details are next up, but that will be for another posting.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline mvd71  
#133 Posted : 24 March 2012 06:09:20(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
nice to see the progress and a "whole" train last night Rick.BigGrin

Cheers...

Mike.
Offline kariosls37  
#134 Posted : 26 March 2012 01:05:29(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Mike, I'll have it running in public, one day...
If I get that set off Steve at least I will have a complete prototypical train to run at shows, provided no-one gets creative and puts tight curves into the layout.
There were also two notable exceptions from that train though, as I forgot to take them.

On the wagon front, progress has continued. A good bit of work has been done on the NS 5301 has also been done, but that is for later.
Detailing was relatively easy, as I had a photo to work off, and I have a more detailed drawing of the other wagon. This eliminates hours of searching for simular wagons to build up a plausible guess as to how the wagons looked. Fortunately most details on these wagons were more or less standard, and the SS went on a widespread standardisation program in 1902 for it's older wagons, making my life a lot easier.
And this is how the dressed up wagons look:
First up the NRS wagon
UserPostedImage
And a view of the end
UserPostedImage
Looking at the door details, and the suspension. These W irons are a lot easier and quicker to make than the open ones. Note how the springs are a bit longer for these heavier wagons.
UserPostedImage
And the younger SS wagon
UserPostedImage
The end again
UserPostedImage
Something that hasn't recieved much attention, although all the wagons have it; interior planking
UserPostedImage
Now it's off to the paint shops again...

Cheers,
Rick
Offline Mark5  
#135 Posted : 26 March 2012 18:45:06(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Great interlude into resin. Just wondering, before I try my own, if you have any advice on how to "glue" resin molded pieces together.
Because of course resin melts too.

- Mark
Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#136 Posted : 27 March 2012 02:34:18(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
With glue of courseBigGrin

Seriously though, I use superglue. Not from the hobby shop, just one that's cheap but still good (I have found a brand that should be avoided at all cost) from the local equivalent of Wall-Mart. If 5 want extra strength or longer working time I will use a 2-part epoxy glue, but I haven't had the need to use it on a wagon kitset yet. Plastic glue won't work because it is a completely diffrent material.

By the way, resin kitsets are made from a two-part polymer which is made by mixing two components together which react to form a solid at room temperature. I do my own resin castings, but that will be the subject of a future posting. The only way you will melt them is by trying to solder the pieces together. The stuff does soften in boiling water though, which is very useful when un-warping bits.

Good luck
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#137 Posted : 29 March 2012 00:54:45(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
After the intermission, we're back to the main programme.

With the top of the locomotive out of the way, it was time to tackle some of the smaller parts. First up was the backhead. This is the back sheet of the boiler, which has the firehole in it and which intrudes into the cab. On these engines the tanks are built around the boiler, and curl around the backhead a bit. In model form the tanks are a simple box, onto which the backhead is soldered. The top part of the boiler is then curved to suit, followed by more soldering. There are a few brass castings which will decorate the backhead, like injectors, the main mitre, gauges and more. The only parts that were added at ths stage were the firehole door and the regulator, both of which are brass etchings.
UserPostedImage

The footplate was then tackled. The actual footplate itself consists of a bottom layer, which takes care of the strength and the flange on the bottom, plus a top sheet which has more rivets. These sheets are tricky to line up, but once they are, they certainly look the part. The smokebox was then built up using some cleverly designed formers over which another sheet with rivets was soldered. The formers and ends are designed in such a way that the joins dissapear once all the layers are attached. Thumbs up for the designer of this kitThumpUp The rear of the smokebox also has a slot and a hole into which the pin and the screw of the boiler fit, making assembly easy after painting. The smokebox door is only attached after final assembly, so that the screw in the boiler can be reached. Other details like steps(with more rivet strips!) and brass castings were added, including the chimmney, which was quite tricky to solder as it takes a lot of heating and aligning. The result;
UserPostedImage

Finally, the brake rigging was built up. Modifications during service turned a reasonably standard brake rigging into something that looks a bit more involved. The actuating cranks from the handbrake and air brake were also added, and are complete with the slotted link to allow the brake cylinder to apply the brakes while the handbrake is off and vice versa.
UserPostedImage
The pictures aren't that flash, done at night with what I had at hand, but you get the idea.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#138 Posted : 04 April 2012 08:35:34(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Work continues to go at a steady pace.
The next thing to do was the roof. This stays removable, and consists of two layers. The second layer was added by the NS for extra ventilation. A bit of careful bending and soldering later and this is the result
UserPostedImage
It's still missing it's whistle, but that will come later.

The extension to the coal bunker and the water hatch were also built up and fitted. The coal bunker extension was fitted to many tank engines in the twenties and thirties to extend the operating range of those engines. It went together without a problem, and the bunker hatch can open and shut too.
UserPostedImage

It was then time to add a few castings to the engine. The safety valve cover and the steam dome were polished brass in real life, and will be added after painting. The dome still needs a bit more attention with some fine sandpaper to remove some pitting on the casting. This is easily done with the bit of screw thread that is cast onto the bottom of the dome held in the cordless drill, and using the sandpaper while the chuck is rotating. The theraded bit of the dome will also become very handy in the final assembly of the loco.
The result looks suspiciously much like a steam engine
The nose
UserPostedImage
And from the side
UserPostedImage
Note that the housing is not actually screwed down onto the footplate or chassis, hence the gap.
What follows is a slower process of checking and adding details. Like most steam engines in the world, no two were exactly the same, and this is especially true for these engines because two companies origionally ordered these engines from Sharp, Stewart a few years apart, leading to diffrences right from the start.
The matter is further complicated by the fact that two years after ordering, I still don't have all the parts, including some of the gears, which are very important for testingCursing

Cheers,
Rick
Offline Mark5  
#139 Posted : 09 April 2012 23:56:18(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Looks brilliant! Thanks for posting!
I am eager to see a video of the whole train up and running....
Enjoy... and hope you find the gears.

And of course you ARE going to adapt this for 3 rail in with a slider and such in one of the car or its loads right?

BTW What was your source for all the history bit by bit... like finding out that NS added the extra roofing for ventilation??
- Mark
Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline kariosls37  
#140 Posted : 11 April 2012 05:26:10(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks again Mark

The 3-rail bit will be an afterthought, the most important thing is to get it running nicely in 2-rail, because that's what it will do for most of it's life. It will be done though, as I cannot run the engine for more that 2.5 metres on my layout.

The history comes from what I've picked up here and there. The makers of kits will have to do a substantial bit of research into the real thing in order to make an accurate model. They will often provide a page of info on the life of the class. The rest is general knowlede about the various railway companies and their habits. For example, the NBDS had a tendency to buy the same locomotive designs and wagons as the SS , like the later NS 1300, which was a SS design. Carefully observing photos and the like is part of it too. The holes in the NS 5300's cab roof can also be found on the NS 8700 and 6200, both of which were built for the NS in the twenties. Each company's CME (chief mechanical engineer) has his own tastes and preferences, which show up in locomotive design.
The only book I have on Dutch steam, "Vervlogen Stoom" (very good book, it gives a good insight into how the NS finctioned in the prewar years) has a chapter on various altertions which is valuable as well.

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#141 Posted : 15 April 2012 08:42:12(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Detailing is a slow process, but there is some progress. First up a few more handrails were added so the fireman can get to the coal a little easier. The handrails are 0.45mm nickel silver instead of the usual brass. Nickel silver looks a bit like the polished steel used for the handrails in real life, so I don't have to mess around with paint to make it look like steel. A whistle was also turned up from some brass wire using my cordless drill and a file, as I couldn't be stuffed waiting for the cast one to arrive.
UserPostedImage

The front end got some attention as well. The smokebox door is a flat etch, but it has to be made dome-shaped to look like the prototype. Hunting around the house for something to make the dome shape with, I settled for the rounded top of a pepper grinder, and with the door lying on a sock, the door was carefully formed to the right shape. No need for any expensive toolsCool The smokebox door was then decorated with hinges, another handgrab and the locking mechanism. This is another DIY part, because I thought I could do better than the provided one. A bit of brass wire was shaped up in the cordless drill, small pilot holes were drilled for the levers which were reamed out and nickel silver wire was soldered in and cut to length. Only then was the whole assembly cut loose from it's "sprue" and attached. Against all expextations, the first go proved to be good enough to pass muster.
The smokebox is still a loose part, ready for final assembly. For now, it is held in place with some strategically placed blu-tackCool

Another set of parts that will only be attached after painting are the buffer beams. This allows the buffer beams to be painted red with minimal masking. The base for both ends is another etch, onto which cast brass air hoses and steam-heat connections for the carriages are attached. Buffers should also be attached to this plate, but because the provided ones are the wrong type, I will make my own casings as soon as I can raid the local hobby shop for some more brass tube. The cast brass couplers were also made up. A clever assembly requiring no solder, these things can be used to couple rolling stock, but because they are so fiddly to use I will mount Kadees, and keep these couplers for running consists at shows. Again, blu-tack holds these parts to the engine
UserPostedImage

Because I occasionally work with real steam engines as well, I see missed details that other modellers may not see. Two glaring ommisions to me in the cab were the reversing lever and the air brakes for engine and train. The air brakes will be added after painting, but I guessed the shape for the reverser and made it from leftover etched bits. The result looks something like this:
UserPostedImage

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 2 users liked this useful post by kariosls37
Mark5mj
Offline steventrain  
#142 Posted : 15 April 2012 09:07:13(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,274
Location: Northern Ireland
Looking good process, Keep posted.Smile

I am very different to do metal/brass kit.Bored
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline kariosls37  
#143 Posted : 16 April 2012 20:39:14(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Steven

Offline kariosls37  
#144 Posted : 26 April 2012 05:01:23(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Because of the lack of parts, I have stopped working on the NS 5301 for now. There are still some bits that I can do, but I will leave that until I get more parts.

In the meantime, I've finished(sort of, no couplers or decals yet as per usualRollEyes) some stuff and started something new.

First the "finished" stuff:
I got around to painting the three coal wagons this weekend, nothing unusual except for the varnish being slightly unwilling to co-operate, but I won that fightCool
First up the last 10 ton wagon:
UserPostedImage
UserPostedImage

Next up is the medium weight category. On the left we have the older NRS wagon, and on the other side the considerably wider SS wagon.
UserPostedImage
The NRS wagon from the side:
UserPostedImage
And the SS wagon also posing for the camera.
UserPostedImage

The new project on the workbench are the last two coal wagons that I will build for now. Again, we ave moved up a category, and are now in the heavyweights amongst the coal wagons, with 20 or 21.5 ton capacity. These were built from 1901 onwards in much larger quantities than before.

The two I am building are the 53301-53440, built by the HSM in 1901, with 140 in the class. The other wagon comes fron the SS and is a fair bit younger, being built by varous companies fron 1914 to 1921, the class of 950 recieved the numbers 57001-57950.

A link to the drawings:
NS 53301-53440
NS 57001-57950


The same old process was followed, with the diffrence that the ends of the underframes were made out of 3.2mm channel, which fits nicely over the 2.5mm channel used for the solebars. The use of steel channel was introduced on more modern wagons, a result of the continual increase of the weight of trains being hauled. This wagon also has a brakeman's hut, which will sit on the extension of the frame.
UserPostedImage
The trickiest part of this wagon was the doors, which have been pressed into a flat pyramid shape for extra strength. This was mimiced by scoring grooves in the backs of the doors with a hobby knife, getting deeper in the middle. The result is not very visible in white styrene, but that will change after painting.

The other wagon was a case of more of the same;
UserPostedImage

Cheers,
Rick

Edited by user 26 April 2012 05:43:54(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline nelsonajm  
#145 Posted : 29 April 2012 20:35:22(UTC)
nelsonajm

Portugal   
Joined: 10/02/2012(UTC)
Posts: 30
Location: Samora Correia, Portugal
what a wonderful work.... congratulations.

Nelson.
Marklin and TRIX fan... from Portugal...
Offline kariosls37  
#146 Posted : 30 April 2012 10:22:25(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Nelson
Offline Mark5  
#147 Posted : 30 April 2012 17:39:54(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Looking good.
Nice to see the to scale worker enjoying a drink along with you.

BTW
Where do you get the decals?
Do you airbrush or paintbrush on the colour?
- Mark
Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Offline steventrain  
#148 Posted : 30 April 2012 19:34:25(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,274
Location: Northern Ireland
Look great.ThumpUp
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline kariosls37  
#149 Posted : 01 May 2012 08:30:05(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Mark and Steven.

That worker is a troublesome one actually, he's the workshops foreman but I never see him doing anything else but drink....

I use an airbrush to do most of my painting, but touch ups are done by hand because it is quicker and just as good for small details. using an airbrush gives a way better result than an paintbrush and the coat is nice and thin so you don't lose any detail.

I draw up my own decals on a program called Inkscape. I have the appropriate fonts for rolling stock and locomotives, and the symbols are drawn up pretty easily as well. It has a built in trace function which is very useful for making builder's plates and the like. The only downside is that the program is not very good at drawing shapes to given dimensions like the CAD programs I sometimes work with are. I have thought of a way around that, although I have not got around to doing it yet.

My intention is to get the decals printed by a club member who has an ALPS printer(which can print white unlike most others). The problem is that it is broken. Another member has offered to fix it for him, but nothing has happend yet...(if your'e reading this Steve, pleaseLove)


Something has happend in the workshops as well(besides drinking beerBigGrin )
It mostly consists of adding rivet strips to the doors, and filling up some empty space on the youngest wagon with a brakeman's hut.
UserPostedImage
The brakeman's hut in detail.
UserPostedImage
And the HSM wagon
UserPostedImage
As you have probably noticed by now, the next step will be adding some wheels, but that is still in the future.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Mark5  
#150 Posted : 02 May 2012 19:21:58(UTC)
Mark5

Canada   
Joined: 29/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 763
Location: Montreal
Great info... I am hoping to get an airbrush kit when I am ready for it.
Thin coats and detail was exactly what I was thinking about.

BTW I know the dutch workmen in general would be proud to see how straightly you applied the rivet strips.
But not sure its enough to stop the foreman from drinking.
Have to put him to work on the rails, instead of letting the boys do it all
.... might have to wait for the composite video to see that.
- Mark


Interested in history of DB, DR and FS from about 1955 to 1965
Fan of signals and catenary; stations and yards. Is there anything else?

Users browsing this topic
Guest
4 Pages<1234>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF.NET | YAF.NET © 2003-2014, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 2.561 seconds.