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Offline kariosls37  
#51 Posted : 28 June 2010 01:12:13(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Steven, Kimball and Bob.
I've run it twice, once on battery powerand once with a bit of electronics to make it run on AC. She runs smoothly, because I took extra care with it, knowing that british kits are notorious bad runners. However, I really can't say any more until it has been finished and run in.
The internal motion doesn't workSad but the first edition of the freight variant of the loco does have fully workling internal motion(2 sets of walschearts motion and 2 additional cylinders with their associated motion)

I've decided that I will do the tender and loco body over again because I am not satisfied with the coat of green. I will do it over again as soon as my next brass project has been cleaned up
Offline kariosls37  
#52 Posted : 29 July 2010 11:16:03(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
A quick update, The loco and tender are bare metal again, But I took the chance to add some extras. First of all,a connection plate between the tender, it stops the fireman from falling between the loco and tender. I also added the NEM shaft to the tender. this meant removing part of the (lovely) coupler moulding, but I would rather have a model that can be coupled to other rolling stock(has anyone got a spare Reinghold?BigGrin )
pictures are unneccecary, the loco's in the same state as a few posts above
Offline river6109  
#53 Posted : 31 July 2010 10:22:52(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Rick,

What a fantastic job you've done.
I've just gone all the way through your process and progress and can't wait for the end result.

You are an inspiration.

John
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline kariosls37  
#54 Posted : 21 August 2010 10:44:55(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thank you Kimball.
when will we be seeing you building a Garrett? DJH has one in it's assortment of kitsWink

And now for something completely diffrent:
A class FBLS cattle wagon, one of tens of thousands of standard wagons built as cattle, closed or vegetable wagons.
This is an all brass kit, which are not for beginners. it has a lot of really neat(and finnicky)details like door stoppers, brake cylinders and roddingThumpUp
I started it a month or two back and have been working away at it every so often. there's a lot of variants that can be made with the kit, and not every bit is desctibed, which makes it challenging(but fun) to build
here's the "unbraked" end in all it's detailed glory. Photos were taken at the Auckland Marklin club
UserPostedImage
The "braked" end with more detail
UserPostedImage
the roof colour is accurate for the thirties. the wooden roofs were coated with linseed oil and sand, turning the roofs a yellow-broun sand colour. from 1930 onwards bitumen replaced the linseed and sand, but the longlevity of the paints meant the sandy roofs lasted until well into the thirties
I want to replicate the texture of the roofs with aluminium oxide sandblaster grit. Does anyone know where I could find it?
To finish off, an overall shot of the "museum" train as it is now. to the left my B24 with coaches and to the right Brendan's NS 1200 with IC coaches
UserPostedImage
For those wondering what's happening with the locomotive, It has been shelved for a few weeks because my impatience to get it finished was not doing the quality of workmanship any good. Once the shed warms up a bit I will strip off the paint again and re do the fillering and paint
I have one kit left, a resin one. But by the time I finish, I hope to have five. Why? watch this space...
Thanks for watching

Offline steventrain  
#55 Posted : 21 August 2010 12:16:01(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,306
Location: Northern Ireland
Excellent.Smile
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline nevw  
#56 Posted : 22 August 2010 00:21:01(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,617
Location: Strathpine QLD
Great work, I do not think that my thick fingers and impatience would be any good in building a kit.
COngratulations.

Nev
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have a new shiny tin Hip that is badly in Need of Repair
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline kariosls37  
#57 Posted : 27 August 2010 12:52:10(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Steven and NevThumpUp

The last unbuilt kit in my inventory is an interesting one. this kit represents one of 1100 general purpose wagons built between 1881 and 1902. these wagons carried 10 tons and were built almost completely of wood. The last ones survived into the 1960's, which is a lifespan of almost 80 years!

The kit consists of 4 sides, an underframe and a roof, plus some other bits to make it look nice.
The obligatory "box of parts" photo:
UserPostedImage
to the right there's a bunch of styrene bits. these will form the other 4 wagons, which I'll scratshbuild.

I haven't done much on the resin kit yet, apart from removing the casting sprue and cleaning up the castings.
Instead, I made a start with the scratchbuilt copies. The basic walls were first cut out of V groove styrene. The basic structure of the wagon is a wooden frame on the outside of the wagon. I cut the corner posts from 2x1.5mm styrene strip, and the rest from 1mm sqquare bar using a basic cutting jig that is made of 2 bits of styrene that guide the knife, and one bit that is glued to set the length of the bit of styrene to be cut. this bit has to be taken off and re-glued evey time I need a new length.
Below are all the frame members cut.
UserPostedImage
By this time I realised that I did'nt have enough 1x1mm bar to make four copies, so I'll build the fourth later.
This is where I finished for the day: above is the resin model, below is the Mk I trial, which passed the test with flying coloursThumpUp Below that is one that is partly assembled, the two frame members on the left and the corner posts have not been glued on yet. Finally, to the right are the ends.
UserPostedImage
Thanks for watching, I hope you like it
Offline kariosls37  
#58 Posted : 30 August 2010 01:26:06(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Sorry John that I called you Kimball before. This glue must be getting to my headBlushing

Anyway, back to modelling.
Next to be built were the sliding doors. The base construction is made from the same V groove styrene as the main body. on top of this I glued 1x0.5mm strips to represent the frame and the diagonal braces
UserPostedImage
As you can see, I Added the braces on the ends as well.
Following on from this, I did the braces for the sides. These diagonals were the only large bits of iron on the real thing. Diagonal strips are a bit tricky to get to the right length. On the resin model, I found evidence that shows that the master model was built in the same way that I am building by copies now.

To glue all these strips on the models, I make a small puddle of glue, in which I dip the part to be glued. I don't use my fingers for this, but hold them in pliers. I then use my left hand to guide the pliers(in my right hand) to where the part has to be. you can see this puddle top, middle, with sections of the braces strewn around it, ready to be glued
UserPostedImage
I drew lines on the sides as a rough guide to where the strips should go. The last section of the braces in the bottom left corner I'll leave for tomorrow, until after I have made up the noticeboards and attached them.
Guiderails for the doors were also fitted, rounding off the day's work.
UserPostedImage
That's all for today, more will come tomorrow.
Any feedback/advice is much appreciated.
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline mvd71  
#59 Posted : 30 August 2010 08:47:43(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
Looking good Rick, keep it upThumpUp

Cheers....

Mike.
Offline kariosls37  
#60 Posted : 01 September 2010 12:18:06(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Mike

Next I did the noticeboards, cut out of sheet styrene with a bit of 0.5mm square on top. The braces could then be completed, as they continue behind the board.
Although hard to see, I also made some rollers out of 1mm round styrene for the doors. Bufferbeams were made for the ends as well, and holes for locating the buffers were drilled.
UserPostedImage
The last major component of the sides are the ventilation grills. the frames are made the usual way, from 0.5mm square styrene and 1mm strip. The louvres themselves were not so conventional. To do these, I cut narrow strips of paper. These were then superglued, with the edge of the current strip overlapping the previous one.
The result looks pretty good, especially when you compare the size of my finger to it
UserPostedImage
To finish off, I did the details on the door, made from 0.3x0.5mm thick styrene. there's 12 strips to a door, 6 doors to do. that's a lot of really tiny bits(the longest is about 3mm!)
UserPostedImage
thanks for watching,
kariosls
Offline kariosls37  
#61 Posted : 22 September 2010 12:00:53(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Hi everyone
Time for aa little update.
With the sides all detailed, a base was cut out of 1mm thick styrene. onto this, the solebars, two beams that give the real thing it's strength were glued onto the bottom.
Then, one by one, the sides were lined out and glued to the bottom. I had planned to laminate the sides onto a base construction of 1mm styrene, but the sides were strong enough in their own right. I did glue a bit of styrene on the insides between the doors to stop any warping.
UserPostedImage
Onto the "raw" buffer beams I added the mounting plates of the buffers. I used a technique new to me for this: the base is straightforward 0.5mm sheet styrene. However, to imitate rivets, I pushed the point of a scriber into the paper to form the rivet head. At this point it is still fragile. The strength comes when you superglue the bit of paper to the model. the rivet heads fill with glue and the paper is soaked, forming a hard and waterproof surface.

I also assembled the resin model. It took two tries to get it right. but it is nice and square now, ready for further detailing.
UserPostedImage
I just love those fine spoked wheelsDrool

That's it for today, I hope you like it.
Thanks for watching
Rick
Offline river6109  
#62 Posted : 27 September 2010 05:39:47(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
Rick,
Its always a pleasure watching your process.

John
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline kariosls37  
#63 Posted : 19 October 2010 09:44:12(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
First of all, Thank you JohnThumpUp

Once the bodies were assembled in the rough, attention could be turned to the underframe.
The solebars carry the majority of the weight of the wagon in real life. They also form the main attachment points for the suspension and were made out 1mm styrene sheet.

After the solebars, I couldn't put off making the axlebox guides anymore. They have to keep the axles in place, so they have to be strong. My first attempt was to file them from brass. It didn't work as brass is a bit of a pain to shape, especially when you have to make 12 exacy copies of them.
So, took a gamble and cut the Mk 2 versions out of 0.5mm sheet, in the hope that the whole assembly would be strong enough to hold an axle.

All the detais were then added to the bare guides, 25parts for each guide, 4 guides to a wagon equals a lot of cutting! Little bearings were also made and fitted, as were the remaining details like hand grabs, steps and signal brackets.
UserPostedImage
Here's a lineup of the four after fillering. As you can see, the styrene guides are a pretty good match to the etched brass ones. And, they can hold an axle no problem. Phew.

UserPostedImage

After a lot of fillering, sanding and more fillering, The models are ready for the paint booth. They will be painted in the following order: roof(dark grey), body(darker gray) and underframe(black. I see a trend developingSmile)
After doing the roofs, I had paint left over, so I put a first coat on 2 bodies. the top coat will be a lot darker, but it looks better than white styrene.

As I can't find enough time at the moment to continue with masking and painting, I've started a new project.
I found drawings of this Dg "goods train accompanyment wagon"(simular to the German Pwg)
Only two of these little cars existed, which featured a guard's compartment and 6 seats for third class passengers. they were built on frames of 2 demolished coaches in 1911.
UserPostedImage
The sides were cut from the same styrene as before, but now with a lot more holes. I want to make at least one of the sliding doors movable, as I have seen a lot of pictures where the doors are half-open.

I thought I would work smarter by sticking both blank sides to the cutting board with some tape so I could cut both sides at the same time.
This move will come back to haunt me later...

Thanks for watching, more updates will follow soon.
Rick

Edited by moderator 11 January 2011 09:50:25(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline kariosls37  
#64 Posted : 25 October 2010 04:09:15(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Time for another update

From looking at the drawings, The sides don't need a lot of work. but this is where photos fill in the blanks, revealing more detail. The lookouts are first on the list. The lookouts were built up without too much trouble from V groove and some bits of square bar bent around a heated brass tube.
As I was test fitting part of the second lookout, and comparing them to the first side, something struck me.
I had cut out the same side twiceBlushing BigGrin

That minor hickup aside, the sides were straightforward to do, although meauring and cutting styrene strip takes some time. The doors are framed, and take an incredible amount of 0.5mm strip to make. The windows only need a ledge on the bottom, and the sides were completed by adding bits of channel and a rail for the door to slide on.

UserPostedImage

Sliding doors were also done with a rectangle of V groove framed by more styrene strip. The sliding mechanism was really easy to make by bending some thin brass sheet around a 0.5mm wire to make a hinge, and attaching two of these to each door. Corner plates were fitted as well, using the embossed paper method.

UserPostedImage

The ends were straightforward to make, with two bits of channel made up of Three 0.5x0.3mm bits of styrene glued into a U shape.

Next I'll fit the hinges of the compartment doors, and then the sides can be assembled into one body

Thanks for watching

Edited by moderator 11 January 2011 09:49:56(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline Kodiak  
#65 Posted : 25 October 2010 05:02:53(UTC)
Kodiak


Joined: 17/02/2010(UTC)
Posts: 145
Location: Melbourne, Australia
This is fantastic work, might have to try this myself. I do a bit of work with plasticard but nothing like this, all my stuff is conversions for war gaming miniatures. keep up the good work. ThumpUp
John and his M track, the only way to train. Now with added C track and bonus K track.

If your gona be a bear, be a grizzly!
You have the right to bear arms, the right to arm bears, what ever the hell you wanna do!
Offline kariosls37  
#66 Posted : 26 October 2010 00:43:43(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks JohnThumpUp

If you want to try your hand at scratchbuilding, local(i.e. Australian-centred in your case) magazines are helpful with basic techniques and tips. I read the NZ model railway journal a lot which has heaps of articles on building rolling stock and plans.
I don't know where to find German wagon plans, But all my Dutch drawings come from here. Photos are essential in making a good model, because not everything fits on a drawing

Have fun,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#67 Posted : 29 October 2010 10:06:02(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
With the ends done, the sides were given some strenghth at the top with some 1mm sheet, because they were starting to bend a bit too much for my liking. After the glue had cured, and after I made and fitted more corner plates, and then stuck the sides to the ends together with more bits of 1mm sheet for strength. buffer holders were fitted as well, made out of drilled-out brass tubing. The final corner plates were fitted as well.
Here's a piccie of the result
UserPostedImage

Interior walls were also made from 1mm styrene, scored on both sides to represent the planked interiors. There's also an interior door in the left wall, so it had to be made as well, complete with brass wire door handle. The interior pic of that didn't turn out too well, so I'll make another one soon.

Because of the open-able doors, I have to make a decent looking interior in the baggage compartment. You can see the benches on the drawing as the rectangles with the rounded corners. The notes that go with the drawing state that there is room for 7 passengers in the baggage compartment, in addition to the 6 allocated seats(left compartment). For some reason more seating is needed for 6 people than for sevenConfused The guard and paying passengers then started moaning that they wanted detailed seats too, so they will be given full treatment as well, so they can enjoy the full comfort of 3rd class wooden benches too.

Here are the assembled benches, plus my lovely bench model.
UserPostedImage

I'll finish off the interior next, before starting work on the underframe.

Happy training
Kariosls

Offline kariosls37  
#68 Posted : 05 November 2010 00:19:44(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Onto the third page of this epic
the interior has been fitted, seven benches and one desk. The whole affair looks really cramped to me, with the 3rd class passengers almost sitting on eachother's lap. most of the seats are glued to the removable floor, so I can paint the whole affair later. Only the seats on the end wall are glued to the end walls, because they would make the base hard to remove otherwise.
It was a beautiful summer's day when I took the pictures, so I took them outdoors on the deck

First up, a overview of the interior
UserPostedImage

The outside is next
UserPostedImage
A look into the luggage compartment. The figures I painted myself. note the door handle, made from brass wire. This bench has a brass armrest as well
UserPostedImage

Underframe details will follow. I plan to have brake rigging, gas supply and more underneath there.

Happy moddeling,
Rick
Offline nevw  
#69 Posted : 05 November 2010 01:05:54(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,617
Location: Strathpine QLD
Great work.
NN
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have a new shiny tin Hip that is badly in Need of Repair
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline kariosls37  
#70 Posted : 08 November 2010 01:48:42(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thank you NevThumpUp
Offline FMS  
#71 Posted : 08 November 2010 02:00:21(UTC)
FMS


Joined: 01/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 832
Location: PT
Very nice!Smile
Regards
FMS
Offline kariosls37  
#72 Posted : 21 November 2010 05:10:38(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks FMS

With the top put of the way, I made a start on the van's underside. Although styrene axlebox guides work, I prefer to have it in brass. The underframe dates from 1863 and has some truss rods attached to it. One axle will be compensated, so only two bearings have to be made. I found one proper bearing, and made the other from bits of brass tube. The truss rods were made from 0.5mm wire
UserPostedImage
The guides and truss rods were glued to the 1mm thick styrene solebars, at the right distance so the bearings were neither too tight nor too loose for the axles.

The next thing to do was the Westinghouse air brake(WHB). With the WHB, an air hose connects the WHB cylinder to a brake stand in the locomotive. By moving the handle on the brake stand, the driver can apply brakes on the whole train.
What's visible on the underside of a wagon are the brake cylinder, brakeblocks and the brake rigging between the two.
These were fashioned out of bits of styrene, 0.5mm wire and some sprue.
On the bottom is the WHB cylinder, followed by the brake blocks and some of the rigging. On the top are screws that hold the body and frame together.
UserPostedImage

Finally, everything was mounted in place. I left some of the rigging around the wheels out because it would cause trouble in fitting and removing the wheels.
UserPostedImage
Next up are the gas cylinder, running boards and final details.
Thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline kariosls37  
#73 Posted : 27 December 2010 00:53:56(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I have been very naughty. I have completed five bits of rolling stock without tellingBlushing

first, the guard's van. I have fitted amongst other things running boards, handrails, axleboxes, springs, vents, door handles and many other things. The van was then painted black and green, with a grey roof. A few things were then touched up, window frames were painted a teak colour and glazing was added. To combine things, I also painted the closed wagons, as well as the roof of the cattle wagon. The cattle wagon together with one closed wagon recieved a sand coloured roof, the others got a bitumen coloured roof. with the grime emitted from steam locos, a streak quickly develops lengthwise across the roofs of the wagons, which I have also created with my airbrush.

The guard's van
UserPostedImage

The kit CHB
UserPostedImage

And the scratchbuilds. I managed to find enough decals for half a side, the rest will be done later
UserPostedImage

Finally, I have started work on the loco againWoot I have done some additional details, and she is now being prepared for her coat of paint. More will follow once there is visible progress.

As always, Thanks for watching
Kariosls
Offline mvd71  
#74 Posted : 27 December 2010 09:49:32(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
It's about time too!RollEyes We were starting to think you'd gotten a girlfriend and lost interest in trains.Flapper

Still, always good to see the latest projects rolling out, and I'm looking forward to seeing them at the clubrooms (hopefully running around the layout)ThumpUp

Cheers....

Mike.
Offline kariosls37  
#75 Posted : 28 December 2010 00:00:16(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
No girlfriend yet Mike. If you know anyone, let me knowBigGrin

The loco should be running by the next club meet(fingers crossed) but unless you get rid of the R1 dogbone it'll only be able to do a staging - Steve's dogbone - staging run
Offline kariosls37  
#76 Posted : 20 January 2011 22:50:27(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Progress on the loco has continued. Generally, there were no big problems with painting. The painting is not done yet, there are a lot of touch ups left, and I have to continue experimenting with a good colour combintation to simulate teak.
The chassis has been assembled to its final form with motor, which is a real milestone because I can now really see the fruits of my labour in motionWub The motor runs smoothly and reasonably quiet. My biggest fear, that the running gear would not run smoothly, did not eventuate and even at the lowest speed there are no noticeable bindsThumpUp

The painted metalwork is done with Humbrol metaliser paints, which can be polished 30 minutes after airbrushing to het on esolid metal colour instead of the glitter effect you see so often. I really like the effect.
The backhead of the locomotive has detail, but I knew from the statr that this is not at all from a Dutch locoThumbDown I decided to leave it, as too much work would go into re doing it all. I did add a true Dutch regulator made from a piece of scrap nickel silver. The detail gives it a very 3D look, as the rest is all cast on. Because 90% of modellers have no clue what everything is for on the backhead, and 80% are probably thinking "what is he on about"LOL I am not too bothered by the discrepancies.

Here is the backhead:
UserPostedImage

The fireman's side of the loco
UserPostedImage

And a shot of the driver's side, done in the style of a work's photo. Compare it to this photo of the real one.
UserPostedImage

And finally a preiser's lineside view of the driver's side. You can almost hear the exhaust beat as she thunders past at a mile a minuteWub
UserPostedImage

Thanks for watching
Rick

thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline MikeK  
#77 Posted : 20 January 2011 23:13:48(UTC)
MikeK

Denmark   
Joined: 14/09/2009(UTC)
Posts: 152
That looks great!! at first I thought those outside views was of the prototype, biggest giveaway is the wooden planks under the track :)

^__^
Mike
A single track on the floor is better than no track at all...
Offline vtt  
#78 Posted : 21 January 2011 05:58:24(UTC)
vtt


Joined: 02/10/2010(UTC)
Posts: 41
Location: Israel
you did a great job with these kits.
makes me wanna give it a shot myself.

are there any kits of Swiss sbb ?
Offline kariosls37  
#79 Posted : 21 January 2011 23:32:26(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thank you Mike and vtt ThumpUp

I am sure there will be manufacturers that make kits for the SBB. You will probably find that the offerings are of more rare and interesting prototypes that major manufacturers like Marklin won't make. Be sure to start with an easy kit.
Offline kariosls37  
#80 Posted : 23 February 2011 08:17:20(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
The last things to do on the loco were the varnishing, electronics and final details like the number plates.
The varnish is a glossy satin. Locos were given a good clean each week, and engine crews took pride in the cleanlyness of their engine, so it is much cleaner and shinier than your regular german loco.
Electronics consist of a Lokpilot, which is wired so a changeover from AC to DC takes the removal of the slider and the flick of a switch ThumpUp
Each light is on a seperate function at the moment, so I can change from a shunting signal to the mainline signal to special signals

Here the "announcement of a extra train from an opposite direction" signal. Lanterns were usually extinguished at daytime
UserPostedImage

A crew was also created using modified Preiser figures
UserPostedImage

And here the pics of the completed locoLove
UserPostedImage
UserPostedImage

And with a train
UserPostedImage
I hope you like it
Rick

Edited by user 23 February 2011 09:04:00(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline dntower85  
#81 Posted : 23 February 2011 14:02:25(UTC)
dntower85

United States   
Joined: 08/01/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,216
Location: Shady Shores, TX - USA
Looks very good well worth the time you have spent on it. Will it Handel R1 curves and C-track in general?

I like the 3 to 2 rail solutionThumpUp
DT
Now powered by ECoS II unit#2, RocRail

era - some time in the future when the space time continuum is disrupted and ICE 3 Trains run on the same rails as the Adler and BR18's.
Offline kariosls37  
#82 Posted : 24 February 2011 22:54:10(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Darrin
The model won't run on R1, because of the long rigid frame. R2 points are just possible at low speed, because of the small flanges of the RP25 wheels. these look a lot better than your usual pizza cutter Marklin wheels, but they come at a cost. Larger radius curves should be no problem. I cannot put her through her paces for some time because I don't have a suitable layout. Until then, I will have to make do with some DC track while I build a DC layout, plus running on a straight bit of my layout.
Offline Christoffer  
#83 Posted : 25 February 2011 21:47:41(UTC)
Christoffer

Norway   
Joined: 23/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 714
Very nice job kariosls37!

Hope you had fun building them :)

Offline kariosls37  
#84 Posted : 28 February 2011 06:17:13(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thank you Christoffer, I did have a lot of fun building it.
How are your brass kits coming along?
Offline Sander van Wijk  
#85 Posted : 01 March 2011 21:23:31(UTC)
Sander van Wijk

Netherlands   
Joined: 20/04/2003(UTC)
Posts: 2,190
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands; Göteborg, Sverige,
Hi Rick,

This is absolutely amazing! Thanks for sharing the full report on constructing such a masterpiece and all the pictures that came with the report. Just wondering though; where does the fascination for Dutch trains come from? I couldn't find the answer to this question in the topic (yet). Any Dutch heritage?

Cheers,
Sander

---
Era I(b): K.Bay.Sts.B. and K.W.St.E.
Offline kariosls37  
#86 Posted : 02 March 2011 07:35:04(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Sander,
You are right, The interest for Dutch rolling stock did not come out of the blue. I am a born and bred Dutchie. Co-incidentally, I bought the loco in my childhood model shop on a trip back to Holland.
The NS virus has really taken hold, and a layout is in the final planning stage and construction will start soon.
Offline Christoffer  
#87 Posted : 02 March 2011 16:34:45(UTC)
Christoffer

Norway   
Joined: 23/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 714
Originally Posted by: kariosls37 Go to Quoted Post
Thank you Christoffer, I did have a lot of fun building it.
How are your brass kits coming along?



glad to hear that!

Mine two are coming along quite nice, just hadn't have the time to take much pictures, but i have some.. gonna do a huge update over in my thread soon ;)
Offline kariosls37  
#88 Posted : 02 March 2011 19:42:33(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I'm looking forward to the reportThumpUp
Offline Sander van Wijk  
#89 Posted : 08 March 2011 14:03:44(UTC)
Sander van Wijk

Netherlands   
Joined: 20/04/2003(UTC)
Posts: 2,190
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands; Göteborg, Sverige,
Originally Posted by: kariosls37 Go to Quoted Post
Thanks Sander,
You are right, The interest for Dutch rolling stock did not come out of the blue. I am a born and bred Dutchie. Co-incidentally, I bought the loco in my childhood model shop on a trip back to Holland.
The NS virus has really taken hold, and a layout is in the final planning stage and construction will start soon.


Hi Rick,

That explains a lot, thanks! In case you need anything that you could only obtain here in the Netherlands, let me know, I might be able to sort you out.

Cheers,
Sander

---
Era I(b): K.Bay.Sts.B. and K.W.St.E.
Offline Webmaster  
#90 Posted : 08 March 2011 20:28:15(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 9,511
I myself am too lazy/incompetent to do this kind of work - so this has been a very exciting topic, following the progress and seeing the results...

Simply excellent, and very educational to see what can be done it you put your heart at it... ThumpUp Smile
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
Offline kariosls37  
#91 Posted : 09 March 2011 09:57:29(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thank you Juhan
You'd be surprised how lazy I can be with modeling. "Prime those four CHB closed goods wagons? Nah, she'll be right" Then the next weekend I park them in a siding on the AMMRC modular layout at a show, not halfway into the day another member plows a freight train into it.Angry BigGrin If you know where you have to look you can tell where I did the patchworkRollEyes They do now have a (interim) varnish coat that protects the varnish coat underneath.
I admit, I am selectively lazy, but the fun is in watching your own creation grow before your eyes, with each day it resembling more of a vehicle that no-one has seen for half a century. I pick models that I like, so it is a good bit more interesting than your usual Faller then-thousand-people-have-built-this-exact-same-buildng kit
Cheers,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#92 Posted : 27 November 2011 05:20:23(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
It's been a bit quiet here lately. I have started building a layout for all the gear to run on, and in between I've built another wagon, mostly with the same techniques shown above. I have now started building a set of 9 coal wagons. The first one rolled out of the paint shops last week, and two more are under construction. Although each wagon is different, I will use some ways in which to accelerate the build, which I will show here.

To start with, a picture of the first wagon, which rolled out of the paint shops last week.
UserPostedImage
It was built for the Dutch State Railways(SS) in 1866. The series occupied the numbers 35286-35532 in NS days. The carrying capacity, as with most other wagons of the period was a modest 10 tons.

The next two came from the SS's main competitor, the Dutch Iron Railway Company(HSM). They were both built by Wagenbau Hamburg in 1874. They occupied the numbers 35901-35980 and 35981-35989. As with the wagon above, they could carry 10 tons. There are minor diffrences between the two, but construction details will be simular.

To start with, the floors were cut out from 0.5mm thick 2.5mm V groove styrene. To that Evergreen channel was glued, and buffer beams were made from 1mm styrene. Sides were also cut out for the wagons, and plank seams were scribed on the interior side. I have marked the sides to identify the diffrent wagon's sides, as they are not the same size.
UserPostedImage
Ends and doors were also cut, and the whole was assembled into a basic body.
UserPostedImage
This was an evening's work, I will continue with the detailing of the body.

Thanks for watching,
Rick
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Offline kariosls37  
#93 Posted : 08 December 2011 09:53:41(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Now and then, when I didn't feel like working on the K-6, I have been adding details to the bodies of the wagons. Two days ago I felt like working with brass, so I decided to make a few W-irons. They are very tedious to file by hand, and if you do them one-by one it will keep you busy for days on end. However, that time can be reduced a lot with a bit of cunning.
Instead of cutting out each one induvidually, I marked and drilled out enough for three sets of four(I will be making more wagons later, so there's enough for another wagon) which I then cut out with tinsnips. As I had already filed one to shape to check dimensions, I tinned the other 11 on one side, and stacked them with some flux with a drill bit through the holes to align them. After heating them with a soldering iron, the stack is marked ready for cutting

UserPostedImage
The stack was then roughly cut out using a cut-off disc on the Dremel. Following that I used a file to remove more material. Sometimes you end up filing a little too enthousiastically...
UserPostedImage
BigGrin
The stack is then unsoldered and the induvidual W-irons are tidied up a bit more before recieving brass pinpoint bearings. They are then glued to the backs of the solebars to form the running gear. The whole process took two afternoons, which is a lot less tedious than the other method.
UserPostedImage
You will notice th eW irons under the wagons are a bit diffrent to the ones above, this is because they are for the SS coal tub shown above. I didn't make any photos of the HSM type under construction.

To finish with, a picture of the ends of the wagons showing the locking mechanism for the end doors. In real life there was a hinge at the top, allowing the end to swing open. Wagons were tipped by special tipping cranes to empty their load into the hulls of ships or river barges efficiently.
UserPostedImage

Thanks for watching,
Rick
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Offline kariosls37  
#94 Posted : 23 December 2011 10:30:13(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
In between other things I have been adding more details here and there. Most of the details are made from styrene strip and brass wire. Because I am building a number of wagons, I make more than I need, so later on I will have a stock of parts that I can just install on a wagon, making the build go quicker. The axleboxes are cast from resin. Unlike wat you sometimes read, my method is low cost, simple and very effective. I will go into more detail on this technique later. The axleboxes are drilled out to accept the bearing, and attached with superglue.
This is the result of a few evenings modelling:
UserPostedImage
The ends have also been detailed some more;
UserPostedImage
This rounds off the detailing, to which the workshop foreman has opened a bottle because the wagons are now the paintshop foreman's problemCool

Cheers,
Rick
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Offline kariosls37  
#95 Posted : 10 January 2012 07:54:31(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
For a few weeks now the two little coaltubs have been sitting on the layout waiting for me to write this post. The painting was done at the same time as the K-6, following the tried and true way. The satin coat is the same for the K-6 and these critters, so they were done at the same time. After the wheels were popped back in together with a little oil, they could enter service. It's quite interesting to see these two wagons, built at the same time, on the same underframe, but with diffrent construction details
UserPostedImage
UserPostedImage

Cheers,
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Webmaster  
#96 Posted : 10 January 2012 21:08:54(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 9,511
Great looking wagons indeed... ThumpUp
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
Offline Yumgui  
#97 Posted : 10 January 2012 21:56:28(UTC)
Yumgui

United States   
Joined: 20/03/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,644
Location: Paris, France
kariosls,

Have just recently read up on this thread ... very nice work !
Thanks for showing your high quality models and the steady progress reports as well ^^ ThumpUp
All those foremen certainly deserve a good slurp ^^ Cool

Yum Tongue
If your M track is rusted ... DON'T throw it out !
Working on : http://www.arep.fr/en/#/welcome
Inspired by : http://www.nakedmarklin.com/ ... I am not alone in this universe, phew.
Offline Christoffer  
#98 Posted : 10 January 2012 23:58:15(UTC)
Christoffer

Norway   
Joined: 23/12/2010(UTC)
Posts: 714
Very nice wagons rick. love your work!

thanks for sharing ThumpUp
Offline kariosls37  
#99 Posted : 12 January 2012 05:27:18(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Juhan, Yum and ChistofferThumpUp
The problem with that foreman is that I never see hm without a bottle. No wonder things are going so slowly now...
Offline smittyau  
#100 Posted : 18 January 2012 00:53:16(UTC)
smittyau


Joined: 11/01/2012(UTC)
Posts: 24
Location: Canberra, Australia
What great work!

Well done.

Sean
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