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Offline kariosls37  
#1 Posted : 22 January 2010 23:42:59(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I got into dutch era II modelling about a year back after seeing pictures of some really nice locomotives. however, next to nothing is available ready to run. that leaves only 2 options: scratchbuilding or brass kits.
so I ordered some models from MK Modelbouwstudio's and bought some tools to assemble them. I will post progress on building them here.
My first kit is a small sand wagon, the first one was built in 1882. in the 1930's 25 were assigned for the ways & works department. in this guise they lasted into the 1950's

the kit consists of 12 pages of information and instructions, one etched brasss sheet, some wire, some brass "channel" and a bag of small parts including the wheels, axles, buffers and axleboxes.
UserPostedImage
to begin with, the chassis was removed from the etch and bent into shape. this was made easy by a partially etched line on the inside of the fold.
UserPostedImage
next up was the ends, where 4 bits of channel had to be cut, soldered and filed into shape. my brandnew 80W sodering iron chars wood very quickly, I noticed. I think it will do the same to fingersBigGrin
UserPostedImage
next up was soldering the ends to the chassis and after that soldering some very fiddly small bits to the ends.
the frame plates were also asembled and soldered to the chassis.
UserPostedImage
the instructions were a bit vague about the next bit, and only after I had bent the parts I realised that they had to be bent the other way. the result was that one bit broke off. it took a lot of patience to solder that bit back into place.
to finish off the day's work, I soldered rivet strips to the body. it makes life a lot easier because I was constantly worrying about them breaking off.
here's today's work. I will continue with it tomorrow.
UserPostedImage

Edited by user 17 February 2014 23:07:55(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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Offline Caplin  
#2 Posted : 23 January 2010 00:17:41(UTC)
Caplin


Joined: 23/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 2,497
Location: Denmark
That is a very interesting project you have started, Rick. ThumpUp
Looking forward to see your next steps. Good luck with it.
Regards,
Benny - Outsider and MFDWPL

UserPostedImage
Offline obxbill  
#3 Posted : 23 January 2010 21:41:36(UTC)
obxbill

United States   
Joined: 20/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,299
Location: manteo, nc
Not seen a brass kit built before. Quite fascinating! Thanks!


Bill
Marklin HO and Z also Hornby 00 and US 2-rail
Offline kariosls37  
#4 Posted : 24 January 2010 07:18:42(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Cheers, Caplin and Oxbill.
the guy who sold me a locomotive kit said it would be addictive, and it sure isThumpUp
the next step is attaching the floor. two lines were not fully etched, so I carefully removed some brass with a fine saw. then I soldered the floor to the frame. it is really starting to look good now.
UserPostedImage
after that it was time to solder the bearings. of course I could'nt resist putting it on wheels and having a test driveCool it runs very smooth, smoother than M*'s plastic bearings, which I oil.
UserPostedImage
next up were some rod's which I don't know the english name for and the close coupler mechanisms. I bent one the wrong way and when I went to bend it right, the part broke offCursing I spent what seemed like an eternity trying to solder it in the right place, and succeded. the other one went together without a fight. However, I don't think I'll use them, preferring the imitation screw couplers instead.
UserPostedImage
the next bit must be the hardest bit of the whole kit; the couplers with a 'safety coupler', completely to scale.
Did I mention they were fiddly to make?
UserPostedImage
the last brass parts are the notice boards on the sides. to finish it off, I still need to add resin axxleboxes and buffershrouds, not to mention a coat of paint
UserPostedImage
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Offline Darren W  
#5 Posted : 24 January 2010 16:47:30(UTC)
Darren W

Canada   
Joined: 01/01/2007(UTC)
Posts: 617
Location: British Columbia
I admire your patience. I can't wait to see it finished.BigGrin

Darren
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by Darren W
Offline Webmaster  
#6 Posted : 24 January 2010 22:59:57(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 9,511
This is great to follow, very interesting to see how it's done...
I thought of getting a brass kit once in the past, but I knew my limits regarding time & skills...

Thank you for letting us follow your progress, Rick. Smile
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
Offline kariosls37  
#7 Posted : 25 January 2010 09:25:50(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks, Darren and Juhan,
the kit is'nt really hard to put together, that's why I started with it. on another forum, someone had posted a picture of the same wagon with a sign on it saying a 10 year old girl had built it. the beauty of brass kits are that if it all turns to custard, simply pop it in the oven, and you can start from scratchThumpUp

to finish off, I added the brake hoses, which I forgot to solder on, and the resin parts(axleboxes and buffer shafts). after you add the resin parts, you can't touch the wagon with a soldering iron anymore, as the resin parts will melt. the kit is now ready to be painted, which will have to wait until I finish the other kits. the paint i bought for the kit is only able to be thinned with "thinner" this is not turps or water, but some kind of petrochemical. does anyone know where to find it in NZ? a ticket to Holland is a bit too pricey to get just one bottleBigGrin
here's the finished result posing with ROCO's NS 633
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thanks for watching, I will now have to decide wether to build a refrigerator wagon or a stake car...
Offline nevw  
#8 Posted : 25 January 2010 10:03:05(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,617
Location: Strathpine QLD
kariosls37 wrote:
Thanks, Darren and Juhan,
the kit is'nt really hard to put together, that's why I started with it. on another forum, someone had posted a picture of the same wagon with a sign on it saying a 10 year old girl had built it. the beauty of brass kits are that if it all turns to custard, simply pop it in the oven, and you can start from scratchThumpUp

to finish off, I added the brake hoses, which I forgot to solder on, and the resin parts(axleboxes and buffer shafts). after you add the resin parts, you can't touch the wagon with a soldering iron anymore, as the resin parts will melt. the kit is now ready to be painted, which will have to wait until I finish the other kits. the paint i bought for the kit is only able to be thinned with "thinner" this is not turps or water, but some kind of petrochemical. does anyone know where to find it in NZ? a ticket to Holland is a bit too pricey to get just one bottleBigGrin
here's the finished result posing with ROCO's NS 633


thanks for watching, I will now have to decide wether to build a refrigerator wagon or a stake car...


Try a Automotive Panel Repair Shop. They will have thinners. But be careful there are many types. Take the paint with you.

NN


wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have a new shiny tin Hip that is badly in Need of Repair
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline Bigdaddynz  
#9 Posted : 25 January 2010 10:44:46(UTC)
Bigdaddynz

New Zealand   
Joined: 17/09/2006(UTC)
Posts: 13,893
Location: New Zealand
Rick, you should be able to find automotive paint thinners from Supercheap Autos.
Offline Caplin  
#10 Posted : 25 January 2010 15:01:26(UTC)
Caplin


Joined: 23/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 2,497
Location: Denmark
Very good, Rick. It must have some weight compared to the usual plastic cars of the same kind. Does it roll nicely as well?
Regards,
Benny - Outsider and MFDWPL

UserPostedImage
Offline Webmaster  
#11 Posted : 25 January 2010 23:19:51(UTC)
Webmaster


Joined: 25/07/2001(UTC)
Posts: 9,511
kariosls37 wrote:
the beauty of brass kits are that if it all turns to custard, simply pop it in the oven, and you can start from scratchThumpUp


My son & his mother found a box of "throwaways" with a lot of Märklin parts, 4 old Märklin semaphore signals, a Trix "Pfalz" loco chassi and a partly assembled brass body kit for it. By the look of the brass body kit assembly - I knew it was probably not my cup of tea, the guy who had thrown it away must have been very frustrated with it in the end... So many parts, so much that can go wrong...

So for the moment, I'm only RTR... But some day I will try, I mean - if a 10-year old girl can do it, why not at least try... Unsure

I've also heard from "local brassbuilders" that they sometimes use acrylic "superglue" instead of soldering for some areas. What's your opinion about that, Rick?
Juhan - "Webmaster", at your service...
He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes. He who does not ask a question remains a fool forever. [Old Chinese Proverb]
Offline kariosls37  
#12 Posted : 26 January 2010 09:51:46(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks for the compliments and advice everyone.
I will have a look around next time I'm in town for the elusive thinner. the wagon runs really smooth, smoother than my plastic wagons. however, it is quite light. it is only a small wagon and a M* coal wagon only weighs a little more even though it is about 1.5 times its length though.
gluing with superglue is possible on brass kits. however, soldeering is a lot stronger and you can move the part around for longer. OTOH, gluing is much easier if you havn't got much experience with a soldering iron or you don't have the right one(at least 60W)superglue also melts at 80C so it also is custard-proof. I will always prefer solder, but then again, I have a good bit of experience already.
glue or solder, what I'd say is go for it! you'll have hours of fun. just don't glue any parts to your fingersSneaky

as for progress today, all I did was paint the varous boards that are meant to hang at the end of the last vehicle on the train
cheers,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#13 Posted : 31 January 2010 08:37:54(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I couldn't wait for long before my hands started itching again...
so I started my second kit. this it a stake car, built in 1892,the last example didn't get scrapped until the 1960's, a life span of about 70 years!
the kit is of the same construction of the sandwagon, being etched brass with resin axlboxes and buffer surrounds. here's all the parts laid out.
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first up was folding the sides of the chassis, followed by adding strips to the deck of the wagon. these strips in real life were intended to make loading and unloading easier in the time before such things as forklifts and pallets.
on the foreground is the deck with one srip to go, and in the background is the folded-up chassis
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that's all I got done that day, but the following day I pressed onCool

after a good day's patrolling on the beach, it was time to solder the relief detail on the side of the body, giving the impression of an I beam. next up was the assembly of the bogies, which took some time as I had to solder each spring 2 times, four to a bogie. to finish off the day, I added the end strips and bearings to the bogies. of course I couldn't help but pitting in some wheels and going for a test driveThumpUp
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here's one bogie complete and the other with springs in various stages of assembly. in the foreground are the body and deck.
thanks for watching,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#14 Posted : 09 February 2010 07:40:26(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
part two of the stake-car build...
it's been a bit quiet here, but that doesn't mean i havent been buildingSmile the wagon is ready for it's paintjob now, but i'll split the report in two for your enjoymentThumpUp

first of all the frame was bent and soldered together with the stayrod. the obligatory test run had to be done, and it runs just as smooth as it's 2 axle brotherThumpUp
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next up was bending four stak-holders and attaching them to the four corners of the wagon. then 4 stakes had to be bent, soldered and filed to fit their holders. the deck(through which the stakes run could now be soldered in place with the 4 stakes as a guide. resulting in a one piece body! (ignoring the bogies)RollEyes
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then it was time fot the other 12 stakes and stake holdersScared putting them together assembly line fashion makes it go quite quickly, but it still took me some time. here's the work in progress photo:
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and i'll keep you all on your toes for how the wagon looks with it's stakesSneaky
keep watching for episode 3,same channel, same timeBigGrin
Offline Macfire  
#15 Posted : 09 February 2010 11:03:51(UTC)
Macfire


Joined: 04/11/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,652
Location: New Zealand
We saw Rick's artistry last night at out AMMRC meeting.
Fantastic.

And ladies and gentlemen,
wait to see what his next baby is BigGrin BigGrin BigGrin
(oops sorry buddy, cat's out the bag)
Lord Macca
New Zealand branch of Clan Donald.
Offline kariosls37  
#16 Posted : 10 February 2010 06:14:51(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
thanks Macca, dont tell them any more. they know too muchSneaky

anyway, here is episode III
a lot of filing later, here are the stakes in serted into the holes on the deck. clearly they've had a bit to drink. no doubt celebrating somethingLOL LOL LOL
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next up is the buffer beams on the ends and the couplers and the couplings. I had to do a bit of modifying here as not all the parts were present for a "safety coupling". I also sprung the coupling itself as per prototype. this is just a small compression-spring between a bit of wire on the coupler shank and the buffer beam.
time to test the coupling...
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to finish off, I added the braces on the underside of the wagon, resin axleboxes and ditto bufferholders
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the "next baby" will have to wait until I get a chance to buy a dimmer circuit. however, I still have 2 other kits left. 10 brownie points to anyone who can guess what they are...
AMMRC members are disqualified from enterinng this competition as they can already knowFlapper
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline Macfire  
#17 Posted : 10 February 2010 06:41:45(UTC)
Macfire


Joined: 04/11/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,652
Location: New Zealand
Awwww.
Unfair!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Lord Macca
New Zealand branch of Clan Donald.
Offline mvd71  
#18 Posted : 10 February 2010 07:44:54(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
Hi Rick,

Let me know what sort of thinners you need, and I may be able to get them for you.

Cheers....

Mike.
Offline kariosls37  
#19 Posted : 10 February 2010 08:41:19(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Sorry to be a killjoy Macca. to give you a hint, it's the resin one...
Thanks Mike, I may be going into town this weekend, so I will have a look. It's in Holland under the name 'thinner' to make life hardThumbDown I may have found it while looking for some paints at work though.
here's the description from wikipedia anyway, translated.

Thinner, "thinner", is an organic solvent for oil based paints.

Thinner is a mixture of volatile organic compounds, toluene or xylene which is usually the main (> 50%), together with such methyl, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, isobutyl alcohol and butanone. The exact composition varies by manufacturer
thanks anyway, I will let you fnow if I need your help
Offline nevw  
#20 Posted : 10 February 2010 22:26:58(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,617
Location: Strathpine QLD
Be Careful. There are many types of Thinners for different types of Paints.

N
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have a new shiny tin Hip that is badly in Need of Repair
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline kariosls37  
#21 Posted : 13 February 2010 04:47:20(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Still no guesses? Anyone?
I'll allow AMMRC members to take a guess now.
Hint: it falls under the general description of "closed wagons"
Thanks Nev, I'll be careful.
Offline mvd71  
#22 Posted : 13 February 2010 08:39:08(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
Rick,

Chances are it only needs some generic paint thinners. But to be sure, just ask Steve Pople. He is an industrial chemist, and will be able to tell you immediately what it is you need and where to get it.

Cheers.....

Mike.
Offline kariosls37  
#23 Posted : 01 March 2010 10:08:16(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Mike, I will ask Steve next monday. I had a look at Supercheap auto the other day, but I couldn't find the right thinner.

a refrigeration van is next up, this one's a little diffrent to the others, as the main parts are made of resin, with brass details. the the 'cast' below featurs; brakehouse, instructions body, frame, roof, brakeblocks, handrails and an etch full of parts
UserPostedImage
first off is straightening the frame, done by throwing it in boiling water. this softens the resin enough so that you can bend it straight. when I test fitted the body, I discovered that it has a nasty warpCursing
UserPostedImage
so, in the hot water it goes, where it's bent back into shape.
next up is cleaning up the brakehouse, and fitting it's roof. then the body is de-burred to make the roof fit nice and snug. here's a pic of the components test-fitted
UserPostedImage

thanks for watching,

Rick
Offline obxbill  
#24 Posted : 01 March 2010 23:29:17(UTC)
obxbill

United States   
Joined: 20/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 1,299
Location: manteo, nc
Very neat kit! I like doin resin kits, myself. Have done a few 72nd aicraft kits from the Czech republic. Sometimes it's the only way to get the really unusual birds.

Bill
Marklin HO and Z also Hornby 00 and US 2-rail
Offline kariosls37  
#25 Posted : 07 March 2010 03:17:03(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Oxbill, I find resin a bit harder to work with because it is a lot less accurate. but as you say, it's the only way to get something unique because of the sheer cost to make te tooling of a plastic model.

Time for another update.
first I had to make the etched windows fit into the resin brakehouse. this meant a lot of fitting, filing and fitting again. it took some time but here it is;
UserPostedImage

the steps and brake were next up to be made. the steps are cleverly etched so they fold up perfectly. the instructions call for mounting the brake rod next. the problem is: there is no brake rod on either etchConfused so, I made my own. below is the finished result together with brakehouse and steps.
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before mounting, the interior of the brakehouse has to be painted. not an easy job because of the smallness of the interior. here's the result, attached, after some more filing.
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this wagon can be fitted with "compensation" which allows one axle to swivel a bit, making sure that all the wheels stay on the track all the time, which looks brilliantThumpUp It is based on the saying "right as a trivet(three legged stool)"
Imagine a three legged stool. All three legs will be in contact with the floor, no matter what the terrain. On the wagon it can be translated this way: The waggon should have only three points of suspension. 2 bearings at the ends of one axle and one on the other, in the middle, turning the 2 contact points on the rails into one on the wagon body.
This is the mechanism. Dead simple, the axles rest in the U-shaped holes, and the whole axle can swivel thanks to the wire that forms a hinge

UserPostedImage

Because the wagon has a brakehouse, I chose to fit it wtha close coupler mechanism there, so it can be used to couple it to M* and other wagons without all fitting them with screw couplersCool
UserPostedImage

The running boards are next up, together with gluing the body together. Now it's starting to look finished, but there's still about two dozen handrails to go, which will complete the waggon.
UserPostedImage

I will hopefully post pictures of the finished product tomorrow.
In the meantime, thanks for watching.
Rick
thanks 1 user liked this useful post by kariosls37
Offline kariosls37  
#26 Posted : 09 March 2010 08:03:32(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
I finally got the right thinner yesterdayWoot However, I can't paint yet as the government does not allow modellers(and others) under 18 to buy primer or paint in a spray canCursing So, I'll have to wait 'til shopping day before I can fire up the airbrush.
In the meantime, I finished the refrigerator van. the last task before the handrails was fitting the brakeshoes. the catch was, that 2 had broken offSad
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Some careful drilling, a bit of wire and some glue fixed that thoughThumpUp
The final task was drilling 50-odd holes for various brass details. By hand. It took some patience, but the result was well worth it.
So without any further ado, may I present the finished result.
non braked side, with a shim placed under one wheel to demonstrate the compensation.
UserPostedImage
And the braked side
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In the black box behind the loco is the next project...

Cheers,
Rick
Offline kariosls37  
#27 Posted : 14 March 2010 09:35:01(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
The black box has been opened, and inside was this:
UserPostedImage
The kit contains all the parts to build a locomotive of the 3900 series. This class was built in 1930 to haul the crack expresses, which had gotten too heavy for the 3700 class because of the introduction of steel coaches. these 2'C (4-6-0) locomotives(top), along with their 2'D'2 cousins destined for coal trains(bottom) had very distinctive Wagner smoke deflectors. The locomotives were painted in a handsome olive green livery with copper chimmney caps and brass domes,Love which were kept spotless by the driver and fireman.

The kit is built from whitemetal, which has a lower melting point than ordinary solder. Only 70C solder can be used.
To start with, I folded and soldered the cab together with this result
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Next up was attaching the boiler and footplate to the cab. As the 70C solder won't stick to brass, I coated the cab with a thin layer of normal solder before turning down the temperature to something that won't melt whitemetal. the boiler is a horror to solder to as it acts like a giant heatsink. Mad it took me two evenings before I was happy with the result.
UserPostedImage

thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline nevw  
#28 Posted : 14 March 2010 09:56:52(UTC)
nevw

Australia   
Joined: 27/08/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,617
Location: Strathpine QLD
What patience and workmanship.
Nev
wearing the Pink Pinny, which is hard to see and now have a new shiny tin Hip that is badly in Need of Repair
Junior member of the Banana Club, a reformist and an old Goat with a Bad memory, loafing around
Offline river6109  
#29 Posted : 14 March 2010 14:57:30(UTC)
river6109

Australia   
Joined: 22/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 10,766
Location: On 1965 Märklin Boulevard just around from Roco Square
nice work, when I get my layout running, I will have time to start with some brass models.

must be a learning curve

John
http://www.youtube.com/river6109
http://www.youtube.com/6109river
5 years in Destruction mode
50 years in Repairing mode
Offline kariosls37  
#30 Posted : 16 March 2010 08:48:54(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Nev and John, The kit does take some patience, especially the heatsink/boiler tests my patience at timesAngry But when I look at the model, it is more than worth itLove

The class was adorned by polished copper chimmney caps. unfortunately, the kit only has a whitemeal one. There is a solution though, elecroplating. Simply put, a DC current is set up through a copper containing solution(copper sulfate). on one electrode(the -ve), copper ions get transformed to copper metal, which forms a coating on the electrode. And hey presto! you have a coper chimmneyThumpUp
Here's the chimmney ready to be plated.
UserPostedImage
The blue stuff is copper sulfate, and the regulated output of the M* decoder was set to it's lowest setting (7V)and the AC is rectified by a bridge rectifier to DC.
UserPostedImage
the finished result is cleaned and soldered on the stump on the boiler
Wub
UserPostedImage
Next up is the front running board, nicely curved. It went tpogether without a fight. The smokebox door is the the last large bit to be soldered to the boiler. But, disaster struckCrying the iron was a tad bit too hot, and I melted a bit of the castingCrying Crying Crying
UserPostedImage
Fortunately, the damage looks way worse than it is, and can be fixed bith some solder and a lot of sanding.Phew. A good lesson learned though.
Thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline Kodiak  
#31 Posted : 16 March 2010 11:20:22(UTC)
Kodiak


Joined: 17/02/2010(UTC)
Posts: 145
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Awesome work with the brass models, definitely something I could get into later on down the track.

Judging by the picture, it looks like there's no chassis in the box that the loco came in. what are you intending to use as the donor chassis? I hope its no the old class 23 in the back ground (I have one that's about 55 years old). Did the instructions recommend a chassis? and have the tried fitting it yet? I've worked with white metal before with my war gameing figures and while it holds detail very well its notorious for being miscast.
John and his M track, the only way to train. Now with added C track and bonus K track.

If your gona be a bear, be a grizzly!
You have the right to bear arms, the right to arm bears, what ever the hell you wanna do!
Offline kariosls37  
#32 Posted : 27 March 2010 22:37:40(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Kodiak,
There is a chassis in the box, so there's no need to chop the nice BR23 up. it's just waiting for a decoder and a tidyup.
As you say, whitemetal does hold a lot of detailThumpUp but unfortunately some parts aren't as straight as they should beThumbDown Now, where did I leave that hammerGlare

It's been quiet here, as I have been busy with other things. That, and me forgetting to take pictures because I'm enjoying the build so muchBlushing
The chassis cosists of 4 1mm etched brass plates, which means a lot of filing. the bearings for the axles were soldered in next, which were lined out with the coupling rods to prevent binding. the brakes and rigging were also soldered in, the pull rods requiring some research as the instructions didn't specify where they should goConfused
UserPostedImage
Then I hit another stumbling block. The dimmer I use to control the temperature of the soldering iron broke down. This isn't an issue for soldering brass, but I now cannot solder whitemetalCursing Fortunately, The next steps either involved soldering brass or no soldering at all. this involved fitting the counterweights, de-burring the coupling rods and fitting crankpins. Quiz: Can anyone tell me why the leading driver has it's counterweight at a funny angle?
the wheels have of course been fitted under the loco, and the result runs incredibly smoothly. you can even blow the loco forward for small stretches.
UserPostedImage
Next up are the cylinders, but that's for another day.
thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline kariosls37  
#33 Posted : 03 April 2010 23:37:43(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Happy easter everyone!
The cylinders were built up next, with each outside cylinder consisting of 2 halves, 2 brass guidebars and four covers. the loco is a four cylinder one, with the centre pair between the frames. these only need to have the covers soldered onto the appropriate place. some careful soldering resulted in this:
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the inside motion is simulated by 2 nickel silver etches. they look great. However,the whole thing is just a little too long to fit where it should. this was solved by cutting a piece out of one of the rods, making sure to cut out the same amount for both sets.
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then a thin strip of brass was soldered to the back of the cut, problem solved.
the last part of the inside motion, the valverod, was then attached by means of a tiny rivet to the rest of the motion, and the whole assembly was soldered in position.
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Meanwhile, I also assembled the bogie, a simple task after the cylinders. the valve rockers for the outside cylinders wera also made and fitted, and the result is something that looks very much like a locomotiveLove
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Thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline Kodiak  
#34 Posted : 18 April 2010 13:26:27(UTC)
Kodiak


Joined: 17/02/2010(UTC)
Posts: 145
Location: Melbourne, Australia
any more? I'm keen to see the loco finished. Might even do some brass models of my own.
John and his M track, the only way to train. Now with added C track and bonus K track.

If your gona be a bear, be a grizzly!
You have the right to bear arms, the right to arm bears, what ever the hell you wanna do!
Offline ulf999  
#35 Posted : 20 April 2010 21:48:50(UTC)
ulf999


Joined: 12/05/2005(UTC)
Posts: 2,024
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
great work!ThumpUp
Ulf, American HO. www.goldenvalleyroute.com/
Offline kariosls37  
#36 Posted : 21 April 2010 10:58:32(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks John and Ulf
progress has been real slow over the past weeks, as the details take a long time to get right(the series was delivered in 2 batches, so small details are diffrent). this takes a lot of looking at photograps, but I only have to add a few more bits before the whole loco can go into the primer!
more details and photos will follow as soon as I get time
Offline kariosls37  
#37 Posted : 23 April 2010 12:05:28(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Big news, The locomotive is completely assembled!
As mentioned above, adding details is a slow process of checking, double checking and modifying parts. Below I will outline some of the changes made.
First, the frame. there have been few changes here, but the exhaust steam pipe to the injector(for throwing water into the boiler) was soldered half onto the frame(big pipe in the middle) and partially on the running boards. the central cylinder covers were also turned upside down relative to the instructions as they were picking a fight with the bogie
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The trainee-drivers(firemans) side
lanterns were drilled out, tinned on the inside and left loose for adding microbulbs to them after painting. Smoke deflectors have been modified and placed 1mm outwards to conform with the prototype. a replacement bit was fashioned for the exhaust steam pipe including a mounting bracket to disguise the seam where the part from the frame meets the footplate. handrails been left loose for painting and will be glued on later
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On the drivers side, the brass wires for the steam lines on the compressor were replaced with copper to mimic the unpainted copper pipes on the prototype. the reverser(boxy thing on firebox) recieved extra detail, walls were added to the rear of the cab, signal brackets were also made up and put on the smokebox. these were for holding the lantarns or boards indicating the end of a train ot an extra train. they are drilled to accept 1:87 versions
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the loco is not done yet, with filling, smoothing, primering and painting to go.
to finish off this report, here's a view from preiser height
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Thanks for watching,
Kariosls
Offline RayF  
#38 Posted : 23 April 2010 12:18:48(UTC)
RayF

Gibraltar   
Joined: 14/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 11,770
Location: Gibraltar, Europe
Looks like a real labour of love!!!
Ray

Mostly Marklin.Selection of different eras and European railways
Small C track layout, control by MS2, 100+ trains but run 4-5 at a time.
Offline kariosls37  
#39 Posted : 26 April 2010 09:53:41(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Ray, It is a labour of love indeedWub(or beast of burden)
With the loco done, It's tender time!
The wheels are held in place by a nickel-silver plate, which screws onto the one-piece chassis. To my amazement, a pickup shoe will fit without any major rebuild under the tender! even the screw is the rght sizeWoot
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The body consists of 4 walls, which are very thick and sturdy, which solder together with some filing. On top of this sits the tender deck, which I will leave loose for the addition and maintenance of all the vital electronic bits. The deck is fitted with coal retainers and a scattering of toolboxes, quick n' easy(after the obligatory filing)
here's two shots of the tender so far
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tomorrow I will take care of the details, which should be a lot more straightforward than the loco.
Thanks for watching.
Kariosls
Offline Macfire  
#40 Posted : 28 April 2010 16:18:33(UTC)
Macfire


Joined: 04/11/2006(UTC)
Posts: 2,652
Location: New Zealand
Rick,
fantastic as usual. Enjoying the progress.
Will we be seeing them next month at the club?
Lord Macca
New Zealand branch of Clan Donald.
Offline Legless  
#41 Posted : 02 May 2010 11:20:24(UTC)
Legless


Joined: 20/07/2007(UTC)
Posts: 528
Location: Leopold, Australia
Nice work Rick, can't wait to see the paintwork.
Legless
Era's 1 to 111,C track
Offline kariosls37  
#42 Posted : 04 May 2010 06:32:50(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Thanks Macca and legless
Yes, I will be taking the loco to the club next meet, along with my soldering stuff for a little how-to on brass kits.

The loco is now completely assembled! There's still some work to do before I can call it finished, but the hardest work is behind me now
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Not the best quality picture(flash and metal don't go together well) but the proof's there.
What's hiding behind the tender? the sandwagon. Together with the other 2 kits are in the process of being painted. I'm not happy with the finish on the sandwagon(the ultra quick-drying paint dried too fastCursing), but the stake car is almost ready for decalling, and the refrigerator van is just waiting for a coat of white. After a bath of thinner, I will paint the sandwagon again.
More details will follow...
Thanks for your continued supportThumpUp

Edited by moderator 11 January 2011 11:42:50(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline kariosls37  
#43 Posted : 15 May 2010 10:46:23(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
The big day has arrived, after months of hard work, the sandwagon is ready to be hauled out of the workshops for it's official photograph
Driver klaas slowly enters the shops, where the wagon is standing. Jan, his shunter hangs the coupling over 633's hook and connects the hoses. "we're good to go!" he shouts to Klaas, who opens the throttle a little bit. The WW2 vintage diesel slowly rolls out the doors of the shops
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After running through the points, Jan changes the points so that the tiny wagon, still smelling like fresh paint can be parked beside the shed, where the cameraman is waiting. "He's all yours" says Jan, before climbing on the loco, off to another job while the cameraman takes his picture
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Later that day, the wagon was spotted in a short train rolling past the workshops and off to some distant siding
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Something diffrent, I hope you like it

Edited by user 15 May 2010 11:14:29(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline mvd71  
#44 Posted : 15 May 2010 11:07:21(UTC)
mvd71


Joined: 09/08/2008(UTC)
Posts: 888
Location: Auckland,
Very good Rick. Is the diesel two rail or three?Confused
Offline kariosls37  
#45 Posted : 15 May 2010 11:23:17(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Unfortunately, dare I say it, 2 railBlushing
I got it from a good friend who stopped training some time back. The loco is responsible for the purchase of all subsequent Dutch mrr stuffRollEyes
Offline kariosls37  
#46 Posted : 27 May 2010 11:24:55(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
On special request from Macca:
Dutch light signals!
Some time ago, before I got the kits, I started to build some signals. These are stictly speaking not era II(1954-present), but they will become part of a module with a dutch theme. I will build a main and a distant signal of the 1946 type once I get some time. These were supplied by the US and featured changable lenses instead of 3 seperate lights, giving me a good challenge to cram everything into a very small space
The signals are built up of various sizes of brass tubes,sheet and wire and some plastic ladders. to complete the job, large-ish SMD LED's(the smallest I could get) were glued in and wired up and a lick of paint was added.
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As an aside, The refrigerator wagon and the stake car have now been finished. The refrigerator wagon sports removable end-of-train boards that fit into drilled-out brackets
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White is a horrible colour to get nice, but I am happy with the result. the advertising was not too much of a challenge, but the "cooperative" decal was anything but. I ended up using the spare decal that is provided.
That's all for today, but I hope to make some progress on the loco this weekend
Offline kariosls37  
#47 Posted : 22 June 2010 03:02:26(UTC)
kariosls37

New Zealand   
Joined: 02/01/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,066
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
It's been a while. other commitments have prevented me from doing much on the loco. However, I managed to get everything primed and painted black and green. the lining was masked after the first coat of black, during which my old(cheap) airbrush died. I'm glad it did, because I now have a really good one in it's place, that gives a better finish. However, The green is not quite perfect, and I may do it over again.
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the loco now looks like it during and after the war. the dome, safetey valve and other bits will still have to be painted brass and copper, and the buffer beams will get a coat of red
This picture shows how large she really is compared to a diesel shunter(ex british austerity shunter)
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I also have found someone who is willing to make some decals that were not provided(Thanks SteveThumpUp )

Edited by moderator 11 January 2011 11:19:39(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Offline steventrain  
#48 Posted : 22 June 2010 19:36:18(UTC)
steventrain

United Kingdom   
Joined: 21/10/2004(UTC)
Posts: 27,306
Location: Northern Ireland
Excellent work.ThumpUp
Largest Marklinist Layout with Centrail station 2/Mobile station 2/60174 boosters/C-Tracks/K-Tracks/M-tracks/Favorites class BR01, BR23, BR50, E103, E120/Insider Club membership since 2004.
Offline kimballthurlow  
#49 Posted : 24 June 2010 05:22:34(UTC)
kimballthurlow

Australia   
Joined: 18/03/2007(UTC)
Posts: 4,183
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Hi Rick,
Very impressive modelling - I am limited at the moment to r-t-r models.
regards
kimball
HO Scale - Märklin (ep III, C Track, digital) - 2 rail (USA and Australia) - 3 rail (English Hornby Dublo) - a few old O gauge.
Offline steamfriend  
#50 Posted : 27 June 2010 12:16:33(UTC)
steamfriend


Joined: 19/11/2002(UTC)
Posts: 376
Location: Leuven, Belgiium
Hi Rick,

Superb work . Congratulations !! I admire your craftmanship ! ThumpUp

I am very curious to learn how well it runs. My experience with such models is that they are not the best runners (read: far away from the "toy"-enginieerded commercial products, which do run well)

Btw, is the inner valve train driven ? I guess not, but from the pics it reveals hinged joints...

Great work, again. Thanks for sharing Drool


Bob
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